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HollowHorn

Clydebank. Past/Present.

A Journey up Kilbowie Road

From Dumbarton Rd. Looking North, Undated:


1913:


Circa 1943:


June 2008:


Canal Bridge (undated):
(I was saved from drowning at this spot by two old ladies sometime around  1959, eight lives left.)


June 2006:


Kilbowie Rd. (just past the canal bridge, looking North, undated)
Postcard view of Kilbowie Road showing, in the middle distance (right of centre), one of the two turrets of the old Palace Theatre on the corner of Graham Street.
The theatre building began life in 1905 as a restaurant, when H McGregor opened dining rooms and a "first-class commercial restaurant" in Graham Street. The dining hall, which could accommodate up to 1,000 patrons for wedding receptions, soirees and conversaziones and other events, was said at the time to be the largest and most up-to-date dining hall in Scotland.
A few years after opening, the building was converted for use as an American Roller Skating Rink. There was another change of use in 1913, when it became a variety theatre called Cinem Varieties. The popularity of the theatre can perhaps be illustrated in the following ditty: Clydebank has a little hall, Cinem is its name. Every week do thousands call, For such is now its fame.
In December 1915 the theatre was renamed the Palace. It subsequently became the Palace Cinema, which was badly damaged in the Clydebank Blitz and never re-opened.

Just south of the Picture House there was a café where we ‘Mods’ would gather, all smart blazers, stay press trousers & silk cravats. At that time there was a bloody rivalry between the Clydebank ‘Bundy‘ & the ‘Derry’ from Drumchapel, nothing to do with us of course, we were a peaceful lot. One evening as some of us were standing outside having a smoke & a laugh, a bus pulled up opposite the café and a dozen or so ‘Derry’ boys poured off it and came sprinting in our direction screaming bloody murder, being much younger than our assailants we scattered in all directions. I headed for the road with two eejits hot on my heels. I turned right and flew uphill towards home. In hindsight not the best decision I‘ve ever made. Just where you can see the tram there was a giant moron swinging a large knife with the obvious intention of removing my head from my shoulders. I ran straight at him, feinted left then right and got passed him, the blade missing my napper by inches. I never knew I could run so fast, fortunately I was built for speed. They kept up the chase for a while & eventually gave up as the distance between us increased. Seven lives left.


June 2008:


Middle of Kilbowie Rd. Looking North. 1930's
(The Billiard Hall to the right was used as an Air Raid Shelter during the Blitz of March 1941. I spent many a Saturday morning down there in the late ‘60s)


June 2008:


Middle of Kilbowie Rd. Looking North. 1930's:
The Bannerman Place tenements to the right contained the New Kinema picture house and the popular Singer Cafe. The former, known locally as the "Kinch" or the "Bug House", opened in 1914. The main entrance was on Kilbowie Road, although there was also access from Bannerman Street. In the 1930s, the New Kinema was upgraded in the 1930s to enable "talkies" to be shown there, but it had fallen into diuse by the late 1940s.
The Singer Cafe was owned by the Tedeschi family, which also owned the Regal Cafe at the foot of Kilbowie Road.





Singer's Station & Factory from Kilbowie Rd. (undated)


June 2008:

Singer Factory/Business Park
Isaac Singer, an American of East European extraction,
built his first sewing machine in 1850. It was patented in 1851
and was immediatelya success. Factories were set up in America
and in 1856, to satisfy the market in Europe, a factory was
established in Glasgow.
The Glasgow factory couldn’t keep up with the demand
so Singer decided to set up in Clydebank. Building started in
1882 with Robert McAlpine and Co. as the builder and was
completed in 1885.
The famous Singer clock, which was 190 feet high was installed
the following year. The clock face was later increased in diameter
to 26 feet making it the biggest in Britain and the second biggest
in the world.
By 1900 the factory was making 13,000 sewing machines a week.
t its peak in 1913 Singer employed 14,000 people.

After the Second World War, Singer steadily declined as the
competition increased and it eventually closed in 1980.
The famous Singer clock was demolished in 1963 during a
modernisation programme.
With the closure of Singer and the decline of shipbuilding,
Clydebank witnessed high unemployment. In 1980 a Task Force
was set up by the Scottish Development Agency to look at
regeneration. In August 1981, Clydebank was declared Scotland’s
first Enterprise Zone. The SDA bought the Singer site and set up Clydebank Business Park.
Radio Clyde was one of the first businesses to locate there.

Top of Kilbowie Rd. Looking North. Circa 1912:
Prior to the Clydebank Blitz in 1941, the Kilbowie Hill area was considered to be a shopper's paradise, boasting around 100 shops including sixteen grocers, fifteen confectioners, eleven dairies, ten newsagents, two posts offices and a bank. The red sandstone tenements on the left were an impressive sight, once stretching in an almost unbroken line to the top of the Hill. Sadly, with the exception of one incomplete tenement at the corner of Kilbowie Hill and Radnor Street, these tenements were totally destroyed during the Blitz.
On the right are some of the small cottages (including the Kilmeny Cottages) that were built on Kilbowie Road from the late 1890s.



June 2008:


Top of Kilbowie Rd. Looking South (undated)
The tall red sandstone tenements on the right of picture stretched from Radnor Street to Second Avenue. All except for a rump at the entrance to Radnor Street (right foreground) were destroyed in the Clydebank Blitz in March 1941.
As a schoolboy, I stood near this spot to watch the Queen pass by on her way to launch the QE2.
]

June 2008:
James

 Crackers HH.



James H
Fjord

Another great topic sir... Gold star for HH  
HollowHorn

Above post updated with new text & improved quality photos.
HollowHorn

Along Glasgow Rd, heading west to Kilbowie Rd.

Atlas Cottages, undated:
(South of Glasgow Rd.) looking west from Clyde Street, across the junction with Cunard Street (right). The Clydebank Shipyard in the far distance.
The Atlas Cottages were built in Atlas Street in 1904 for foremen employed at the Clydebank Shipyard, and take their name from John Brown & Co's Atlas Works in Sheffield.


June 2008:


To the left of the Cottages (outside photo) stands the booking hall of the old Riverside Station which was part of the Caledonian Line:
Clydebank Riverside Station, undated:


Thomson brought their workers down from Glasgow daily by boat until 1882 when the Glasgow – Yoker – Clydebank railway was opened. Initially this terminated to the east of the shipyard but when the “Cart Cut” of the Forth and Clyde canal closed in 1893 it presented an opportunity to extend the rail link to Dalmuir. The extension opened in 1896, the station building having been designed by Sir J J Burnet. The line was closed in the Beeching cuts of 1964. The building is now residential housing.

June 2008:


Postcard view of the Empire Cafe, early 20th century (behind the advertisement hoarding) at the corner of Glasgow Road and Whitecrook Street:


In 1901, the Simeone family opened its first cafe at 429 Glasgow Road near Yoker Athletic's football ground. Their second was the Empire, which was opened at 147 Glasgow Road in 1910. The cafe was located in a wooden building that had been the Clydebank Co-operative Society's smiddy, built on ground rented from the London & North Eastern Railway Co. The wooden building was replaced with a more substantial brick building in the 1920s. The cafe was demolished in the late 1970s during the widening of Glasgow Road.

June 2008:


John Brown's main gate on Glasgow Rd. Undated:

Started by J & G Thomson in 1871, businessbuilt up steadily,
employing 2,000 by 1880. However it ran into financial problems
and in 1899 was taken over by the Sheffield steelmaker
John Brown and Company. The shipyard prospered under the
new management and in 1907 it launched the Lusitania, which at
that time was the largest ship ever built. As well as building
ocean-going liners it also built warships including HMS Hood,
launched in 1918.
The prosperity lasted 20 years but following the Great War
the yard went into decline. The gloom was lifted with the order
for the Queen Mary, launched in September 1934. The
Queen Elizabeth, followed in September 1938.
The last great ship under the John Brown name was the QE2,
aunched in September 1967. In 1968 John Brown & Co.
became part of Upper Clyde Shipbuilders. It was bought by
Marathon, an American oilrig firm, in 1972 and by UIE in 1980
but went into decline and closed for the last time in 2002,
by this time as part of the Kvaerner Group.
The yard is now demolished:
June 2008:


Co-op offices to the north of Glasgow Rd. Undated:

This building on Hume Street, built in 1903, contained the offices and meeting hall of the large Co-op store (built in 1917) that still operates on Alexander Street to this day. The street of my early childhood.

June 2008:


Glasgow Rd. 1940's:

The first opening on the left is Wallace Street. In 1940, the properties at Nos 2 and 4 Wallace Street were demolished to make way for a Woolworth store. It was referred to by the locals as the "sixpenny store" since, when it was first opened, no item cost more than sixpence. It is now a Snooker Club.

June 2008:


Glasgow Rd. 1958:


June 2008:


Fire appliances at Hall Street Fire Station on VE Day, 8 May 1945:

Hall St. is just to the west of Kilbowie Rd. (Clydebank Cross) where Glasgow Rd. becomes Dumbarton Rd. Fire appliances at Hall Street Fire Station on VE Day, 8 May 1945. The building to the left of the fire station housed Hall Street Swimming Baths, and one of several entrances to the Clydebank Shipyard is on the far left.

Clydebank Fire Service started in 1887 with premises in Whitecrook.
It moved to Hume Street in 1897 and then to the Hall Street
building in 1904. A full time firemaster was appointed in 1907.
It remained in Hall Street until the present fire station in Kilbowie Road
was opened in 1962.

June 2008:
falseface

Great Work HH

You do look a bit worst for wear in this shot


James

HollowHorn wrote:
To the left of the Cottages (outside photo) stands the booking hall of the old Riverside Station which was part of the Caledonian Line:
Clydebank Riverside Station, undated:


It appears to be closed in that picture which would date it from 1964 onwards.



James H
jimmys

Clydebank

Situated in Dalmuir and hardly ever mentioned now was one of the biggest shipyards in the world in its time, The Beardmore Naval Construction Yard.
It was downstream of John Browns and stretched to the sewage works. This was the origin of Beardmore Street.
I am not a local in that area and I dont know if there is any trace. A lot of the tenaments and buildings in that area were associated with this yard.

The yard sat in the area of the large hospital.

regards
John

Excellent stuff HH  
peter kemp

These photos are particularly scary as I went to work in Browns when much of these scenes were still there. We even had our wedding reception in the old City Bakeries Windsor Tearooms just on the mid right  of pic.
John

Re: Clydebank. Past/Present.

Singer's Station & Factory from Kilbowie Rd. (undated)


I was involved in the final stages of the demolition of Singers, I especially remember that last shed close up to the railway platform.
I also remember Gavin Hasitngs the rugby player coming down there during the demolition and trying to kick a rugby ball through one of the upstairs windows of a building (maybe out of shot on the left) for a promotional pic, it took him 3 or 4 attempts not helped by us jeering him when he missed. I`m guessing that happened 1989/90 HH ?
dorothyP

This is spooky. Where did all the people go in these modern pictures? I'm astounded at the changes in these pics.

D. :)
Alex Glass

 to Urban Glasgow Dorothy

Changing times and no more heavy industry
dorothyP

Alex: Thanks for your response. But does that mean the population of Clydebank has dwindled significantly, while that of Glasgow has increased? It looks spooky to me. I'm not sure I like it. But maybe if I was there, I'd think differently. Alas.

Can you fill me in on something else that has changed since I was last there? Those zig-zaggy lines on the street...what do they do/mean/indicate?

Thanks for your help.

Dorothy
mr.underwood

Ziggy-Zaggy Lines

Hi DorothyP,these lines are to indicate a no-parking zone either side of the traffic lights,this is a pedestrian crossing area and they dont want to deplete an already depleted area even more.
glasgowken

Love this thread, well done HH    It's a shame to see Clydebank is a shadow of what it was.

The photo here shows those tenements on the hill after the blitz. The destruction in Clydebank never seems to get attention in any of the recent tv programmes about the blitz, you'd think it only happened in London.

http://www.theclydebankstory.com/imageview.php?inum=TCSA00024
HollowHorn

dorothyP wrote:
Where did all the people go in these modern pictures?

The problem is, D, that they took away the town centre & replaced it with a shopping centre & retail/business park. There really is no reason for people to be walking streets that lead nowhere.
Not sure when you were in Clydebank, but have a look at these sites:

http://www.theclydebankstory.com/...=69b84465fbd8752358520ac2ef786a02

http://www.myclydebankphotos.co.uk/page2.htm
sputnik

dorothy,clydebanks population has reduced by about 10,000 since the sixties.they pulled down loads of tenement buildings and built retail and industrial units which they continue to do even though the original ones have never really fulfilled their potential.
dorothyP

Mr. Underwood: Thanks for filling me in on the road signs. I'd never have figured that out on my own.

Sputnik and Hollowhorn: I'm absolutely astounded at the changes that have taken place. I haven't been back since the 80's but had been thinking that I'd like to go back once more. When I see these pictures and your accounts of how things have changed, I'm scared to go back now!

Hollowhorn, you must be from right around my neighbourhood, judging by the photos, which are an excellent record of the area, by the way. I lived in Whitecrook being raised by my grandparents until I was six, and then moved one block away from Our Holy Redeemers, in Dunedin Terrace. Is the bowling green still there, do you know? Is Dunedin Terrace still there? I couldn't recognize anything on your picture of Elgin Street, but went to school there.

I almost fell off my chair when I saw your picture with "Telfers"!  Do you remember the Scottish Wool Shop? I wanted to work there when I grew up. I thought it was the most fabulous place on the planet.

This might not be a bad place for me to ask something else...I've been trying to trace some ancestral documents, and also two adopted cousins. Does anyone know if there remains anywhere in Clydebank where I might be able to track down the whereabouts of these cousins?

I'm just stunned at the changes that have taken place. Thanks, everyone, for your input. I really appreciate it.

Best,

D. :)
sputnik

dorothy,dunedin terrace has not changed in my lifetime and the bowling green and club are still there.i am whitecrook born and bred 49 years.the local registrar may be able to help with your research into the family.elgin st school was pulled down in the eighties ,ohr school has relocated to east barns st and st andrews although only built in 1970 is not long for this world.dr meilans house at the corner of dunedin and south douglas st is a wee hotel/pub and the unity club next door to it has been demolished.dont know when you last visited the area but dawson and downies and the biscuit factory are away as well.
dorothyP

Good Lord! Dawson & Downies is gone? And the UCBS? I can't believe it. Wthe location of all my memories gone, it's like I never existed!

I lived on Barns Street before moving to Dunedin Terrace. My grandfather worked at John Browns. Whitecrook Park used to have two big ponds, the bigger one being used for sailing boats originally. The last time I was back (1981?) it was drained but still looked okay.

I'm completely gobsmacked by these changes.

D. :)
HollowHorn

dorothyP wrote:
Whitecrook Park used to have two big ponds, the bigger one being used for sailing boats originally. The last time I was back (1981?) it was drained but still looked okay.
D. :)


This one:


dorothyP

Hollowhorn: OMG! The maypole! The maypole! I'd forgotten all about the maypole! Yes, that's it. See the sailing boats at the left hand side? You can almost see my grandpa's house in that picture. That's amazing. Amazing.
Thank you.

D. :)
cybers

Boating pond is a cracker.... Was there much swimming in it ?

Re Maypole
Todays children are far to precious to play on such infernal contraptions.
Nowadays a play park cant go up till it has had risk assesments done...

In the old days it was generally left to the kids to carry out such assesments  

HH you will have the health and safety round to you if you keep trying to show kids something that was fun.

Dont suppose there was a witches hat in any clydebank parks now that was dangerous... But that was part of the attraction.
Last one i remember seeing was in Queens Park.
Stuball

Even when I was young we had death trap playparks... like the metal framed cube climbing frame and roundabout with rough tarmac ground... and chutes that were more than 12 feet high
sputnik

the pond in the photo was flattened and grassed over.the really dangerous bit about that maypole was that it was two very heavy steel chains that you swung on.the pond was about three feet deep and many local kids got their first swimming lessons in it.the bandstand in the background now sits beside clydebank shopping centre.the tennis courts are still very popular but the yearly garden fete bit the dust many years ago.excuse me for asking but where are you these days dorothy.
dorothyP

Sputnik: I'm about to swoon. They leveled the pond and replaced it with grass? OMG!! What desecration
When I was 13 I was brought to Canada (very much against my will). As the years have passed I've felt less and less like I "belong" anywhere. I've been gone from Scotland for too long - never even got a job there - but there's never a day goes by that I don't think about returning to Scotland, yet despite the years I've spent here, I don't belong here either. I live in Ontario, but no longer know where "home" is.  It's not a nice way to live, frankly.

D. :{
HollowHorn

dorothyP wrote:
As the years have passed I've felt less and less like I "belong" anywhere


Quote:
yet despite the years I've spent here, I don't belong here either. I live in Ontario, but no longer know where "home" is.  


I know exactly how you feel, D. I left Clydebank aged 17 & the town that I grew up in was still more or less intact. I moved to Glagow for a while then settled in Paisley, been here for around 25 years. The problem is that I only ever returned to Clydebank via the Erskine Bridge to visit my mother in Briar Drive (North Kilbowie). Using this route I never noticed that the Clydebank I knew & grew up in had been destroyed. All the cherished places & physical memories of my childhood have gone, I can never return, they no longer exist. As I said, I've been in Paisley for many years but have never considered it 'home'. Neither can I call Clydebank 'home' as it's no longer there, it's as if it never existed. I now revisit my childhood via old photographs of the town, thank god for the internet. I have such a feeling of loss at times it's too hard to describe with any clarity. Occasionaly I go back for a wander with my camera, sometimes I visit the shopping mall, but I never see anyone I knew from my youth. Maybe they too have moved out of the area, but in truth, how would I recognise them anyway, after all this time has passed?

Pee ess....I still have a scar on my foot from stepping on a broken bottle in the 'Yachting Pond' I used to swim/paddle there as a child. Have you heard Billy Connolly on 'Knitted' swimming trunks? Never a truer word was spoken in jest.  



Pee pee ess...Have you checked the links I posted earlier? The 'Clydebank Story' has some wonderful photographs, just click on 'Site Map' for all era's.

Owen's 'My Clydebank Photos' site was a revelation to me, I'd long searched for photos of our first house in Alexander St. without much success. Owen managed to capture the actual demolition, fantastic stuff! He also has a fair amount of photos of Whitecrook. Have a look.
Jock58

Hi All
Gone are the days of proper swing parks
Withes hats, open roundabouts, see & saws, spiders webs & rocking horses.
I remember my friend walked behind one of those rockin horses just as it was coming back. Two black eyes & a jeelie nose.
Ah how the rest of oor wee gang laughed that day.      

Jock58
dorothyP

HH:  Yes, you've described it well. I've said this before, but will say it again: I think the town "planners" should be hung out to dry. They've eradicated our history, impressive architecture, local way of life, values, and heritage, just to name a few things - all courtesy of the bulldozer. I think it's appalling. You said: "I have such a feeling of loss at times it's too hard to describe with any clarity." I completely understand what you mean. It's beyond my comprehension how this could've been allowed to happen.

Ironically, HH, I was born in Paisley and went to Clydebank as a babe in arms.

As for friends you wouldn't recognize, I'm afraid I'd be the same with cousins who I used to feel very close to. It's a horrible disconnect.

I've never heard Billy Connolly on 'Knitted' swimming trunks. But I must keep my eyes and ears open for it now that you've mentioned it. I know that I was once given a royal blue knitted swimsuit, complete with white circles on it, and way-ay too small, to wear when my school went to the baths (dare I ask? Gone too?). There was a hunky young lifeguard who used to man the pool and I was affronted because all the other girls had real swimsuits and I had to plunk around in this too small, itchy, wooly thing that I was afraid would shrink when I was in the water, and then, who knew what would be exposed. As it turned out, I got running around the pool, the lifeguard yelled, "No running!" and trying to put on the brakes, I slipped on the wet and went down with a slam. This gorgeous lifeguard came over to see if I was okay, and was ever so kind to me, and THEN I realized that my too small swimsuit had descended and was exposing my 9-year old boosom. I was so embarrassed, I wanted to DIE. I was never able to look at that lifeguard again.

D. :)




Pee pee ess...Have you checked the links I posted earlier? The 'Clydebank Story' has some wonderful photographs, just click on 'Site Map' for all era's.

Owen's 'My Clydebank Photos' site was a revelation to me,
sputnik

dorothy,the old baths in hall st and the new baths in bruce st have been closed down for many years now though both are still standing.i went to an art exhibition in the new baths last year ,it was very good but it felt weird with all this stuff on show in the pool where i learned to swim.welcome to clydebank is a good website that a lot of expat bankies contribute to.a few from canada as well.
dorothyP

Sputnik: Thanks for that suggestion. I've checked out the Welcome to Clydebank site, and as you said, it's very good. Now I'll have to flit back and forth between it and here!

Best,

D. :)
harky2402

Interesting reading this thread the last couple of days. I stay in Whitecrook too, have done for over 30 years now, moving from Dalmuir when I was 5 or 6 (memory too hazy now )

I went to Elgin St school so remember the biscuit factory, and Dawson & Downie. Never saw the pond actually used for boating, the only time ever saw water in it was when the Scottish weather was its usual wet.  The park has changed a great deal since then.

Cheers,

Mark
Stuball

My mum went to Elgin st school....
dorothyP

Let's see...Elgin Street School - I was in attendance between 1957? and 1962, then went to Braidfield for a year before being brought to Canada.

D. :)
HollowHorn

OHR for me, then on to St. Stephen's & St. Columba's. I wonder if we passed each other in our prams, D.  
dorothyP

Hah! Maybe we threw stones at each other! I'll bet we crossed paths at some point.

When I lived on Dunedin Terr. we were right at the corner and used to come out to see all the little "brides" and boys dressed up in their suits when they were trundling down to OHR for their confirmations.

Maybe you were one of those awful boys who used to shove me out of the way when I'd try to get pennies that the grown up grooms threw out the taxi windows after they'd got married.

Who knows? Who knows?

D. :)
sputnik

dorothy,im really sorry to keep giving you bad news but im afraid braidfield school is getting a visit from the bulldozer very soon.it has been annexed to clydebank high school to form what is being termed a superschool.st andrews high and st columbus are following suit.hollowhorn,im ex ohr an awe i left miller st as a tot in 1960.dorothy,ive just remembered theres a site called rootschat that may help with your wee request.
dorothyP

Good Lord, Sputnik! Is there no end?

Despite the fact that I loved going to Braidfield, I, once, almost burned the place to the ground. We were being taught how to make steam puddings in domestic science class. We were supposed to keep checking the pot to make sure there was still plenty of boiling water in it. I kept checking and checking, and then one time...it wasn't just dry, everything inside was burnt to a frazzle. Did the school inspector not come around JUST as I made the discovery! The teacher made me sit at the counter and eat every last charcoaled ounce of that steam pudding.

Now I love my food charcoaled, but couldn't remember how to make a steam pudding if my life was at stake.

Thanks for the referral, Sputnik. I'll follow up on it.

Hope you're well.

D. :)
HollowHorn

dorothyP wrote:
boys dressed up in their suits when they were trundling down to OHR for their confirmations

Remember me?


 

Quote:
Maybe you were one of those awful boys who used to shove me out of the way when I'd try to get pennies that the grown up grooms threw out the taxi windows after they'd got married.


Ring any bells?


 
dorothyP

HH - OMG! You were that toothless little pest that nobody recognized when you got all cleaned up and dressed up for the big event, and made yourself look like a little angel! I always thought you had amazing eyes, but my mother told me they were Catholic eyes! You swore at me once, and you were on your way to OHR at the time.

You certainly look like a happy boy in that picture.

As for the second photo - I'm still laughing! I can't imagine where you dug that up from but that's the perfect photo of those events, no?

Thanks for a good laugh.

Hope you're well.

D. :)
Stuball

dorothyP wrote:
Let's see...Elgin Street School - I was in attendance between 1957? and 1962, then went to Braidfield for a year before being brought to Canada.

D. :)


I think you'd have been the year above my mum... I'll phone her later and find out what years she went before moving to Perth
dorothyP

Wouldn't it be something if your mother and I know each other?

D. :)
HollowHorn

A past/present set from Owen at 'My Clydebank':
http://myclydebankphotos.co.uk/page3.htm
dorothyP

These comparison pics are great. My eyes almost bugged out of my head when I saw the houses that have been built opposite OHR. It looks as if the bus stop has even gone! Those were my old stomping grounds. Wahh!

Thanks for posting and for letting me see.

D.
HollowHorn

Hey DP, if you give me a list of places, I'll go photograph them for you. I could do with a quest.  
dorothyP

E-mailing you privately.

D. :)
HollowHorn

Doroth-P wrote:
There are a couple of things I'd really like to see, one of which won't be available right now, or perhaps is no longer available. I used to think the fairy lights at Dalmuir Park were absolutely enchanting. There must have been thousands upon thousands of lights used. There used to be an improvised ship in the middle of the stream that goes through the park (don't even know the name of the stream or where it leads to, although I suppose it's the Clyde) and it used to be all decorated with lights, and then there were gnomes and fairies that were lit up and hidden among the plants on the walkways. It was absolutely magical and I've never seen anything to compare with it. If they still decorate the park to that extent I'd love to see that again.


Dalmuir Park Illuminations at night, 1950s.
Quote:
From 1945 to the early 1960s, Bankies could enjoy a visit to their own annual illuminations without having to go to Blackpool! This was made possible through the efforts of the Burgh's Lighting and Parks Department which, every August, transformed Dalmuir Park into a fairyland of coloured lights.
The Illuminations were first mounted on VE Day in May 1945, initially to bring some joy to the lives of people who had endured the rigours of nearly six years of war. No effort was spared to make the Illuminations a success: thousands of coloured lights were strung up; illuminated fairytale characters and animals were created; there were magnificant floral displays and competitions, concerts and beauty parades were staged at the Shell Bandstand, north of the pond.
In 1963, the Illuminations were discontinued in favour of Christmas lighting in the town centre.


I could only find a few photos of the illuminations (which I well remember)


Quote:
An illuminated model of the passenger liner Arcadia at anchor in the pond during the annual Dalmuir Park Illuminations, early 1950s.
This replica of the Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co's liner, launched from John Brown & Co's Clydebank Shipyard in May 1953, was a welcome addition to the numerous attractions to be seen in Dalmuir Park during the annual Illuminations. In later years, she was joined by full-scale models of John Brown-built "Cunarders" such as the Ivernia, Saxonia, Carinthia and Sylvania.



The floral boat in Dalmuir Park.
Quote:
The floral boat on the Duntocher Burn, immediately above the "high dam breast", was one of the park's most popular attractions. Here, in the shallow water around the floral boat, generations of children paddled or fished with their nets for "baggie" minnows, watched by adults picnicking on the nearby grassy banks.
In the background, on sloping ground just to the south of the fenced-off duck pond, the name CLYDEBANK has been formed with flowers. The presence of the Shell bandstand among the trees beyond the duck pond suggests that this floral display was mounted in 1936 to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the Burgh of Clydebank.



This is all that's left of the boat:






You may remember the waterfall which was also lit up during the illuminations:



Dorothy-P wrote:
The other thing I'd like to see is perhaps a bit more vague, and may not be possible for you to take pictures of either. I told you that my grandparents raised me. They were both cremated and their ashes scattered in a place called The Rose Garden at the crematorium. Is there more than one crematorium? I don't know. And I have no idea where any crematorium is. All I know is that's what I was told. I believe there's a small plaque with my grandfather's name on it (Andrew Pert), and I don't know if my grandmother got one or not. However, I'd love to see what that rose garden looks like. I only have an image in my mind of what I imagine it to be.


There is a 'rose garden' at Dalnottar crematorium, though there are no markers there & very few roses come to that:


There are markers inside the hall of rememberance but it was closed at the time of my visit:


Dotothy-P wrote:
There are two other places I'd also be grateful to have photos of. One is at the bottom of Dunedin Terrace. If you stand at the sandstone end of the block (I used to live on the ground floor of number 8, on the right hand side - that was our front room, and my bedroom that I had to share with my mother) and walk towards the grey stone part, and keep going to the end of the block, on your right hand side, there used to be a little building tucked in there. The Territorial Army used to keep some stuff in the building and the TA's used to practice marching at that end of the street. If the building is still there, then to the left of it is a wall. I used to climb the wall, where there was a hole in it, and play on the earth and watch the trains going by. We had to be careful not to be seen or else a railroad man would come and chase us away. But I'd be interested to know if that hole is still there, and I'd like to see if that's still the same.


There is not much left of the area, it is now a continuation of John Knox St.
There is a hotel at the end with a little building between it and the tenements, is this the right place:
Here is an old photo:


Some present day shots:





If you mean the building that stood behind me as I took the first pic, it is now a modern school building (St. Andrew's) This is the original building that stood where the school now stands:

The former Clydebank Public Hall on the corner of John Knox Street and North Douglas Street.
It was opened in 1884 by Robert Carswell, J & G Thomson's cashier.
The hall was the venue for the first meeting of the newly-elected Clydebank Commissioners held on 27 December 1887. The library of the Clydebank, Yoker and Dalmuir Working Men's Institute was transferred from Clydebank School to the building shortly after it opened. It was also utilised as the police court, with prisoners being brought there from the police station in North Douglas Street. Church congregations also used the hall: St Columba's Episcopal Church and the Clydebank Baptist Church held services there, the latter while their new church in Alexander Street was being built. It was also the venue for functions such as evening concerts, soirees and wrestling.
The Clydebank Town Hall, which opened in 1902, replaced the old Public Hall as the venue for official and social functions. Before the outbreak of the Second World War the old building was used as a drill hall by the 1st Dunbartonshire RVC, 9th Battalion, Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders Territorial unit. It was demolished in January 1969 and the new St Andrew's Secondary School was built on the site.


Dorothy-P wrote:
The last thing I'll ask for may also be a difficult one. There's an A and B part to this one: (A) I've seen a couple of pics - they may have been yours, I'm not sure - of Elgin Street. I know that area either has changed or is changing drastically. I used to go to Elgin Street school, but below the school, just beside a pub that corners onto Glasgow Road, is a phone box. If you stand at the phone box and look across the street, there used to be tenements there. If they're still there, I'd love to get a wide shot that would incorporate the first few entranceways, perhaps down to the corner at Glasgow Road.


Firstly, here is a shot of Elgin St. school:
Postcard view of Elgin Street School looking east, c 1915.
Quote:
In August 1896, the Old Kilpatrick School Board sanctioned the building of a new school at the corner of John Knox Street and Elgin Street in Clydebank, to serve pupils residing west of Yoker Burn. Lord Overtoun, son of the first Chairman of the School Board, conducted the opening ceremony. He recalled that, in his youth, the area around the new School had been largely comprised of green fields.
Initially the School had had approximately 1,000 pupils, but by the late 1930s Elgin Street School, in common with other local schools, was suffering from falling rolls. This process, which was caused by movement of the population from the area and falling birth rates, continued well into the 1970s, so that by the early 1980s the school roll had slumped to 158 pupils. Consequently, and despite local opposition, the school closed on 29 June 1984, the remaining pupils being transferred to nearby Whitecrook Primary.



I managed to find a photo of the red phone box, it stands beside the Mainbrace Bar which before that was the Bisley Bar. (The local gang were also called 'The Bisley') In the street to the right of the photo once stood underground public lavatories.


Alas, this is the present view of the bar corner:


This is the view opposite the bar where you requested photos of the tenements, now sadly long gone:




Dorothy-P wrote:
The (B) part is that if you look towards the school, the road goes up a hill and becomes a bridge that goes over the railway tracks. A picture of that hill as it rises up, and any structures around it would also be of interest to me.


As you may remember, on the other side of the hill once stood the Dawson & Downie factory & the United Co-operative Baking Society building 'UCBS' as it said on the chimney (we used to call it 'You cannae bake scones')
Here are a couple of photos:

Dawson & Downie:



The UCBS:
(With Whitecrook School beside it) (Also note the folk on the roof)
An aerial view of the United Co-operative Baking Society biscuit factory at John Knox Street in 1948. The factory supplied biscuits to co-operative societies throughout Scotland.
The UCBS was founded in Glasgow in 1869 to supply bread from its large factory in McNeil Street in Hutchesontown to the city's co-op branch stores. The Clydebank Co-operative Society affiliated to the UCBS in 1893, and soon held enough shares to warrant a seat on the board of management.
In 1901, dissatisfaction with the service provided by UCBS led to calls for the Clydebank society to establish its own bakery. Not wishing to lose its business in Clydebank, UCBS entered into negotiations with the local society, resulting in an agreement to build a large biscuit factory in Clydebank. Bread continued to be supplied from McNeil Street.
The factory in John Knox Street opened in 1903.


Quote:
View of the United Co-operative Baking Society's red brick buildings in John Knox Street from the south bank of the River Clyde, 1981.
The UCBS biscuit factory was opened in Clydebank in 1903 and was, at its peak, one of the district's largest employers. Most of the factory workers were women who produced a wide range of cakes and biscuits which were sold in Co-ops around the country.
The building with the dark roof in front of the factory is Elgin Street School. Since this photograph was taken, both factory and school have been demolished.



This is the present view looking uphill towards the bridge:


The view back towards where the phone box once stood:


And lastly, the view from the bridge looking down towards Whitecrook where 'D&D' & 'UCBS' once stood:


Sadly, Dorothy, everyting that you wanted to see (with the exception of Dunedin Terrace) has now gone. I'm sorry I could not be the bearer of better tidings.    If you want photos of any other part of the area, let me know.

If you click on the link below (give it time to load the photograph) You can drive up & down the street by clicking on the arrows. The first view shows John Knox St. to the left, Dunedin Terrare to the right & the location of the Bisley bar at the far end.

http://maps.google.co.uk/maps?f=q...TmdZiIA&cbp=12,223.84,,0,2.87
jimmys

In the early sixties I worked in Aitchison Blair , Whitecrook Engine Works in Stanford Street. It was a very old business.
Across from us was a large boiler works, I cant remember the name.
A lot of the buildings and businesses in this thread were still there then.

regards
jimmy
dorothyP

Sending private message.

D. :)
dorothyP

What an amazing amount of work you put into getting these pics and their history!

I have to admit, I looked at them yesterday and was so stricken - devastated - by the changes that I couldn't send you a reply until I was able to pull myself together (well, sort of).

What's with the yellow and orange walls where the Bisley Bar used to be? Uggh! And the complete disappearance - as in "Poof, it's gone!" of the landscape I knew makes me wonder who, or what is behind these changes. These are such ruthless changes, you really have to wonder what the desired psychological effect was that they were trying to attain.

It's really spooky to see these once busy streets with not a living soul on them - proof of sub-standard urban planning, if any more proof was needed. Okay, I'll get down from my soapbox now, and tell you that I was intrigued by the background info you provided on the Dalmuir Park Illuminations. How incredibly sad that they would do away with them. The people behind them created magical masterpieces that I can still see in my mind's eye.

What a colossal shame that the floral boat has been allowed to deteriorate and nobody's seen fit to take that tree out of it's upper deck (!) and bring it back up to standard. They'll spend hundreds of thousands on paving miles and miles of roadway, and rather than spend a few pounds to upgrade a little piece of history, they'll allow it to continue to deteriorate until they will declare it an eyesore and do away with it as well.

You know, I had forgotten about the waterfall. How lovely to see it! It looks wonderful. And yes, I do remember how amazing it looked at the illuminations. This is a wonderful photograph. Thank you.

Dalnottar crematorium may well be the place. You're a good detective! I understand that the marker is supposed to be "inside" so you've probably found the right place. Thank you for these photographs and the info.

My goodness! I can hardly believe how Dunedin Terrace looks now. They must have put a new finish on the walls of the tenements - d'you think? That couldn't be the same stone sandblasted, could it? I only remember it being grey! And a hotel at the end of the street! Who's have believed that? There used to be enough drunks rolling out of the bowling green at night. I can imagine what it must be like now with a hotel at the other end of the street!  :)

My goodness! Where in the world did you find that postcard of Elgin Street School? That's the girl's playground, where I used to play! Apparently my grandfather also went to that school. How's that for history? And some politician/building developer/twit razed the thing. I ask you!

Good Lord! I'd forgotten about the underground lavs! That was such a busy corner. It's really spooky to see it so barren with windowless, sterile buildings on the corner now, and with a complete lack of social interraction. Where are all the pedestrians? This is a terrible design for social interraction and community spirit. The Bisley Boys may have been scary but I'm not sure this is any improvement. It's just scary in a different way - a spookier way. It looks like something out of a science fiction movie where nobody knows what anybody else is doing or thinking but lives in fear of what is going to happen next.

Dawson & Downie! Oh, I remember always running past there because the loud noise of machinery used to scare me. I used to pass it when I went to my grandparent's house.

And what an interesting background history you got on the UCBS. I remember it being the "You Can't Bake Scones" too! Hah! What wonderful old pictures!

And the bridge - there used to be a greyhound training track to the right of it, wasn't there? And over the bridge, at the bottom of the street on the left were the grounds where the Fete used to be held every year. I think it was a Catholic Fete.

The Google Map link was interesting, but frankly, I found your photos and information to be moreso. Thank you EVER so much for this. I'm sending a private message in addition to this one.

Thanks again.

Dorothy
sputnik

the school that was built on the site of the drill hall was opened in 1970 and is now to be demolished,st andrews high.the white building is the douglas hotel,i was in it on saturday as my son in law was playing bass guitar in the group that was on.the dalmuir illuminations have been revived this past two years and are usually lit up on september weekend only ,i was there last year and will post photos here soon.
sputnik

Dalmuir Illuminations.











sputnik

dorothy,the hotel was once a house that belonged to a dr meilan.the garden fete was a yearly event,a fundraiser for what was then an irish sisters of the poor convent on mill road.it has since became st margarets hospice on east barns street across from where ohr school now stands.hollowhorn,great pics mate and well done.
dorothyP

Sputnik: Thanks for the update, input, and pics. The people who put the illuminations together are truly exceptional, aren't they? I can almost see the little elves and fairies running off to hide in a couple of those pics. Thanks for posting them (It's just a tad entertaining that they put a string of lights around the tree that's growing out of the boat! Hah!).

If the illuminations are only on for a week-end in September...if I ever get the opportunity to come back, I'll make sure I time it to be there in September. I'd hate to miss them and am glad to know they're still on, and when.

Interesting to learn about the developments with the school, and hotel. Your sil must be a good musician, Sputnik, otherwise, I'm guessing you'd have steered clear of the hotel.  :)

Also interested to learn about the fete. Thanks again.

Hope you're well.

Dorothy
HollowHorn

Hi Dorothy, managed to get in on Wednesday, couldn't find anyone to open the book of rememberance case, maybe next time. More past/presents to follow.

dorothyP

What's going on in and around Clydebank these days, all? An empty mind wants to know.  :)

Dorothy
HollowHorn

From Owen at 'My Clydebank':

Quote:
Hello Everybody,
I hope you are all well. Just a short note to let you know I have added an old film that I took in 1975 of Clydebank. I shot it on Super 8 cine film. It jumps a bit in places as it is very old but well worth a watch I think. I hope you enjoy it. Should bring back some memories for a lot of you.


http://www.myclydebankphotos.co.uk/page6.htm

dorothyP

This site is developing a great record of the Clydebank that used to be. That was a good film. I really enjoyed watching it. Thanks for posting.

Hope all is well.

Dorothy
bankiecan

jimmys wrote:
In the early sixties I worked in Aitchison Blair , Whitecrook Engine Works in Stanford Street. It was a very old business.
Across from us was a large boiler works, I cant remember the name.
A lot of the buildings and businesses in this thread were still there then.

regards
jimmy


I served my apprenticeship with Aitchison Blair ..I left there in 1957 to go to Canada...John Browns Land Boiler Division was across the street.
E Mail me at ******..I'd like to exchange info.
Frank McGonigal Ont.Canada.

Moderator Edit

Please dont publish your email address on an open forum

dorothyP

E-mailing.
sputnik

the land boilers shed is due for demolition folks.application granted for new flats there.between stanford st and the canal.
dorothyP

Jeepers. Are you going to take any photographs before everything gets razed?

Tell me something...do you find it difficult to keep up with all the landscape changes? I find that not being around to adjust to each change makes me feel overwhelmed when I see photos of the massive changes that have taken place since I was last in Clydebank. I wonder if you have a sense of difficulty too, of if my experience is the result of my inability to make small adjustments as they happen.

Let me know if you're taking pics!
bankiecan

dorothyP wrote:
Jeepers. Are you going to take any photographs before everything gets razed?

Tell me something...do you find it difficult to keep up with all the landscape changes? I find that not being around to adjust to each change makes me feel overwhelmed when I see photos of the massive changes that have taken place since I was last in Clydebank. I wonder if you have a sense of difficulty too, of if my experience is the result of my inability to make small adjustments as they happen.

Let me know if you're taking pics!


GOOGLE MAPS gives you a virtual tour of some Clydebank streets..Stanford St.is one of them ..amazing
HollowHorn

Hey Dorothy, hope you're keeping well.  
dorothyP

ROBERT!!  It's GREAT to see you around. I thought you must have paddled off to the South Pacific to bask on the warm sand.

How've you been? Taken any photos lately?

I hope you're well.

Dorothy
sputnik

dorothy,braidfiel school is being demolished this week.i do take pics and have some of the stanford st shed but i dont know how to post .i am hoping to rectify that soon.
dorothyP

Oh NO! I went to Braidfield. In Home Economics class we had to make a steam pudding. I burnt mine to a frazzle - and it was on the day the school inspector came round. The teacher was so mad at me she made me eat every last bit of the steam pudding, charcoal and all.

Demolished? Oh, gracious. It was a brand new school, only built a couple of years or so before I went there. Surely it's still a sound structure...?

Can you get any photos of it before they raze it, Sputnik?

Dorothy
John Houston

Fascinating post.  Grew up in Alexander street from 1952 to 1968 attended OHR & St Pats and like many others have lost contact with my roots . Really interesting pictures & info which certainly bring back memories of the way we were!  Many thanks.
dorothyP

Where are you now, John?

I don't know if you checked all the posts right back to the beginning, but you'll find some great photos that some of the members have generously posted. They're worth checking out.

Dorothy
sputnik

for some REAL nostalgia check out song o the yard on you tube.
John Houston

Sputnik o you have a link to song o the yard - tried various spellings but cant find it on You Tube?

Dorothy P : My location is in a top floor flat in Hyndland G12 only 6 miles but in some ways far distant from Alexander St. although we do have views down Clyde valley past the Erkine bridge to Dumbuck.

john
sputnik

john,try song o the yard by leo coyle.
dorothyP

Sputnik: Great song! I really enjoyed it. Thanks for letting us know about it.

Dorothy
dorothyP

John Houston: Sounds like a great location. I envy you the view. It must be lovely.

I've been fortunate in benefitting from the graciousness of members on this thread who have been kind enough to send me photos of the "new" Clydebank, as well as historical pictures of the Clydebank I remember growing up in. Being able to see these "views" has been a great experience for me, and in some cases has forced me to adjust my thinking (I'm a big believer in the "if it works, don't fix it" school of thought!), but I'm becoming more and more flexible.  


Dorothy
harky2402

This sculpture by local artist Tom McKendrick, which is a tribute to the Clydeside shipbuilders, is located at the corner of Dumbarton Road and Beardmore Street in Dalmuir, Clydebank.  It is of the dreadnought battleship HMS Ramillies, built at Beardmore's in Dalmuir and launched in 1917. This sculpture is made from galvanised steel and sits atop a 26ft plinth.







HollowHorn

John Houston wrote:
Grew up in Alexander street from 1952 to 1968 attended OHR

Me too, 1953 till around 1960 when we moved up to Graham Ave.
Doorstop

Excellent pics Harky .. I had absolutely no idea thon was there.



Narrative kerb running the length of the open air part of McConechies Fish and Chip Boat, Clydebank shopping centre, Clydebank

Click for full length silly size version.
dorothyP

Interesting picture.  Thanks for posting.

Dorothy
Doorstop

Very welcome I'm sure .. although strangely .. the silly size version is easy to see when I view it via Windows picture viewer on my desktop but appears stupid tiny (even clicking the magnify option) when viewed in the forum post.

How does that work then Ted?
dorothyP

The picture came up fine at my end. Is about 4" x 5" or there abouts. I can see the content clearly. No prob.

Dorothy
Doorstop

Ah that's ok then .. thanks Dorothy.  

HAng on a second .. did you click on the picture?

It changes to the full version which is two or three screens wide.
AlanM

Yeah DS it's just a thin strip, FF reduces it to fit in a single screen - clicking on it brings it to original size - which is a slightly thicker strip

try CTRL + a couple of times to make it bigger
dorothyP

Good suggestion, Alan. Interesting strip.

Dorothy
iain_mcguinness

Amongst other Web sites, I've been using this forum to research content for our walking tour of Clydebank, which is based on my two films, Post-Blitz Clydebank and Clydebank Through A Lens.

http://www.clydebankpost.co.uk/ne...8453-clydebank-tours-to-take-off/

Clyde-built: a walking tour of Clydebank (photos)



It's been very helpful, so thanks to all of you with the great memories! Here are some clips from my films, which I thought you might appreciate:

Post-Blitz Clydebank: Clydebank Blitz [3MW for Channel 4]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NvC1v1BklV8

Post-Blitz Clydebank: Trailer
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXIqWojqdW8

Post-Blitz Clydebank: Don't Spread Germs (1948)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vR9aZhm3sCI

Post-Blitz Clydebank: Dorothy Lamour at the Singer Sports Gala (1950)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVKx8eN8-yE

Post-Blitz Clydebank: War memorial and Solidarity Plaza
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xbr1Rrs7V6I

Plan of Clydebank (post-Blitz)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U130bkP1WNg

Clydebank Through A Lens: Employment (Part 2)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2W84gPFpf34

Clydebank Through A Lens: Employment (Part 3): Demonstrations, protests and strikes
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6kY0UBY6zI

Clydebank Through A Lens: The BMX Track
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3E1RThCW3hs

Clydebank Through A Lens: Recreation, entertainment and leisure: Café culture [excerpt]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FcbQSxuXCtU

Clydebank Through A Lens: Recreation, entertainment and leisure: Film and TV [excerpt]
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3U2J-YqtTc
Stuball

Hi Iain, welcome to UG and thanks for posting all these links.

If it's ok with you, I'll repost these later as embedded links so they can be viewed from the site? (not tonight since the new forum server is slow as treacle tonight)
iain_mcguinness

Thanks, and you're welcome. Aye, that's no problem at all.
Stuball

Post-Blitz Clydebank: Clydebank Blitz [3MW for Channel 4]



Post-Blitz Clydebank: Trailer



Post-Blitz Clydebank: Don't Spread Germs (1948)

Stuball

Post-Blitz Clydebank: Dorothy Lamour at the Singer Sports Gala (1950)



Post-Blitz Clydebank: War memorial and Solidarity Plaza



Plan of Clydebank (post-Blitz)

Stuball

Clydebank Through A Lens: Employment (Part 2)



Clydebank Through A Lens: Employment (Part 3): Demonstrations, protests and strikes

Stuball

Clydebank Through A Lens: The BMX Track



Clydebank Through A Lens: Recreation, entertainment and leisure: Café culture [excerpt]



Clydebank Through A Lens: Recreation, entertainment and leisure: Film and TV [excerpt]

sputnik

the clydebank map shown there has linnvale in the middle of the shipyard,strange place for a housing scheme.linnvale boundaries are kilbowie rd,great western road ,drumry railway,and the forth and clyde canal.just in case any of you decide to visit linnvale and find yourself in an abandoned shipyard.
iain_mcguinness

If you watch the video, you'll see that it's a moving map, and that it's moving up towards Linnvale at the canal, at that point! YouTube just chose an image to represent the video that isn't, well, very representative.
sputnik

aye,fair play iain.having watched the video again it brought to my attention the fact there are two burns running through whitecrook.i have lived there all my days and only ever knew the yoker boundary one i didnt know about the one that branched off up through linnvale and drumry and then heads off to drumchapel.i did collect frog spawn from it as a child but we called it the drumry burn as it ran behind drumry station.thanks for posting.btw,hows your walking tour progressing?
iain_mcguinness

That's interesting stuff! My Mum is from Whitecrook, so she might know something about it.

The walking tours company is coming along well. We're going to begin our trials this coming Bank Holiday weekend, from the first to the third of May, beginning at Queens' Quay, near the Purser's Office. I'll be abseiling off the Titan Crane, at around 10:30!

I'd like to invite anyone on this forum to come along, and take part in a complimentary 90-minute walking tour, either at 11:00, or 15:00, on Saturday, Sunday or Monday.

To book your places on the walking tour, please visit http://www.clydewalkingtours.co.uk/, email hello@clydewalkingtours.co.uk, or telephone +44 (0)871 900 2111 or +44 (0)7949 252 250.
AlanM

iain_mcguinness wrote:
That's interesting stuff! My Mum is from Whitecrook, so she might know something about it.

The walking tours company is coming along well. We're going to begin our trials this coming Bank Holiday weekend, from the first to the third of May, beginning at Queens' Quay, near the Purser's Office. I'll be abseiling off the Titan Crane, at around 10:30!

I'd like to invite anyone on this forum to come along, and take part in a complimentary 90-minute walking tour, either at 11:00, or 15:00, on Saturday, Sunday or Monday.

To book your places on the walking tour, please visit http://www.clydewalkingtours.co.uk/, email hello@clydewalkingtours.co.uk, or telephone +44 (0)871 900 2111 or +44 (0)7949 252 250.


Hope its not too windy. It was pretty blowy when I abseiled it, but good fun  
James




James H
HollowHorn

Acht, my past belongs to me. Sometimes though, she is a stranger to me.
I often miss her and occasionally long for her, though she will never, in truth, be entirely mine again. That's ok, I'll thank her for the memory & move forward, though perhaps glancing back now and then.
James

HollowHorn wrote:
Acht, my past belongs to me. Sometimes though, she is a stranger to me.
I often miss her and occasionally long for her, though she will never, in truth, be entirely mine again. That's ok, I'll thank her for the memory & move forward, though perhaps glancing back now and then.

9:17 pm on a saturday night? A bit early for getting tore right intae the sherry, is
it no faither?



James H
Stuball

HollowHorn wrote:
Acht, my past belongs to me. Sometimes though, she is a stranger to me.
I often miss her and occasionally long for her, though she will never, in truth, be entirely mine again. That's ok, I'll thank her for the memory & move forward, though perhaps glancing back now and then.


I can hear the sad music from Steve Wright in the Afternoon

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