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Hawick_1987

Drygate and Duke Street Prison

DRYGATE (Drygait) is one of the oldest and most historical throughfares in the city. 'Dry' is Germanic in origin, being the name by which a German priest was called in ancient times. 'Gait' comes from the Norse "gata", meaning road or path, and originally referred to a gap, rather than the barrier which closed the port.

The street has its origins from the Cathedral, winding down the hill towards the Molendinar burn. Here's what the area looked like in 1547...


...and by 1670...


...and one from 1822


Dwellings were built for friars in the 1500s and a mint has been discovered at the corner of Gibson Heights, dating from 1392. Even a logboat was found during an excavation in 1863. Four major buildings stood in this area prior to the 18th century; the North Gaol, the Duke Of Montrose's dwellings, Lord Darnley's house and the Mint.

Duke of Montrose's dwellings and prebendal houses 1872


Duke of Montrose's dwellings and prebendal houses (site of) 2012
fastnet

Great pics.

Did you take them all yourself mate ?...........    
Hawick_1987

Duke's Lodgings 1700s



Duke's Lodgings 2012 - N from Duke Street


Lord Darnley's House, Cathedral Square 1872 - tentatively named after Darnley's supposed stay whilst visiting St Nicholas' Hospital (modern day Barony Church Hall)


Lord Darnley's House (site of), Cathedral Square 2012


Infant School Society, Drygate at Cathedral Square 1828


Infant School Society (site of), Drygate at Cathedral Square 1828
Hawick_1987

fastnet wrote:
Great pics.

Did you take them all yourself mate ?...........    


Aye, I just fired up the DeLorean!  
fastnet

Hawick_1987 wrote:
fastnet wrote:
Great pics.

Did you take them all yourself mate ?...........    


Aye, I just fired up the DeLorean!  


   
Hawick_1987

Drygate, looking W to Rottenrow 1843


Drygate, looking W to Rottenrow 2012


The Battle of the Bell O'the Brae was fought near to here in 1297. More information here: http://urbanglasgow.co.uk/sutra81382.php

Drygate looking S to Ladywell Street 1800s


Drygate looking S to Ladywell Street  2012 (the original route of the road banked sharply down the hill to meet Ladywell Street nearer to where Tennent's front door is today)
Hawick_1987

Drygate's most famous resident was the North Gaol which later became Duke Street Prison. A jail was established here in medieval times as more of a reform house than the type we know today. In 1798, the borough established the Bridewell or northern prison (the southern one being located on Glasgow Green), which took over large swathes of land in a roughly triangular area encompassing Duke Street, John Knox Street and Drygate.

This aerial view from 1930 shows the Prison to the left of the massive High Street Goods Railway Yard.


Conditions were said to be very poor and 12 hangings took place there between 1902 and 1928 (Southern Prison used prior to this for judicial executions), when Barlinnie took over such procedures. The Men's prison remained opened until the 1930s - as remand holding cells - whilst the Women's prison did not fully close until 1955. The site was demolished in 1959 to make way for the Ladywell housing scheme (1961-1964) which stands there to this day. More history to be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_Street_Prison
Hawick_1987

Various views from inside Duke Street Prison




Eastern Cell Block 1959


One of the flogging tables recovered from the site prior to demolition
Hawick_1987

Suffragists at the Main Gate, Duke Street 1912


Main Gate (site of), Duke Street 2012


Main Gate, Duke Street 1960


Main Gate (site of), Duke Street 2012


The only signs of the main gate are the waymarker '16 y' etched into the wall near to a bus stop, and the changes in the former prison wall as 1960s stone meets 1800s stonework.

16 y marker just visible in the stonework


1800s stone - darker, smaller. 1960s stone used to fill the main gate - lighter, larger


The wall also moves out slightly from its position, then jumps back into alignment after the main gate.
Hawick_1987

The Prisoner's Aid Society House, John Knox Street c.1901 - just outside the grounds, used for reformed prisoners


Cathedral House Hotel, John Knox Street 2012



Hawick_1987

East Gate, John Knox Street 1909


East Gate (site of), John Knox Street 2012


East Gate prior to demolition 1959


2 views of the prison walls looking S down Drygate

1898


1959


Drygate looking S 2012 (site of)
Hawick_1987

Prison Yard looking SE 1959


Prison Yard (site of) looking SE 2012


Main Cell Blocks looking NW 1959


Main Cell Blocks (site of) looking NW 2012


Main Cell Blocks looking NW from Great Eastern Hotel 1935


Main Cell Blocks looking NW from Great Eastern Hotel 1959


Main Cell Blocks (site of) looking NW from Duke Wynd Flats 2012
Hawick_1987

Main Cell Blocks and outbuildings, Duke Street 1955


Prison Walls, Duke Street looking NE 1959


Prison Walls, Duke Street looking NE 2012


Drygate view N of Main Cell Blocks 1959


Drygate view S of Main Cell Blocks (site of) 2012
Hawick_1987

Prison Walls, Duke Street at John Knox Street 1959


Prison Walls, Duke Street at John Knox Street 2012


A roofer working on Tennent's new brewery looking NW up Drygate 1950


Prison Yard 19??
Hawick_1987

Now a wee look at what else survives of Duke Street Prison

Looking N up John Knox Street - lower parts of prison wall intact



At the corner of the re-aligned Drygate with John Knox Street


The street as stated, was altered when the Ladywell Scheme was built in the 1960s. It ran south-east through the current Tennent's service yard to a junction with Ladywell Street.


Going NW it rose sharply up the hill to meet Cathedral Square



The extension to the Glasgow Evangelical Church on Cathedral Square blocks the older route


At it's top end it curved round to meet the Bell O'the Brae (High Street)
Hawick_1987

Drygate at High Street - lower part of prison wall intact


High Street - lower part of prison wall intact


Burrell's Lane - prison wall at it's former height




Graffiti from 1982 if you look close enough!


Duke Street - lower part of prison wall intact runs the length of the scheme on this side
Hawick_1987

The best remains are to be found in the middle of the scheme. The retaining wall of the older north yard cells is still standing from 1871




Ring post still in situ - any guesses?


The outline of steps leading to the blocks are still visible



1960 wall meets 1871 counterpart


Traces of the blocks are still there, just!


The stump of the 'hanging tree,' cut down by the council in 1996

Hawick_1987

The most notorious incident related to the prison took place in 1921, when members of the Sligo Branch of the IRA ambushed a prison van en-route to the remand cells at Duke Street Prison, killing a police officer in a mass gunfight. Full story may be found here:  http://saoirse32.blogsome.com/2006/04/25/battle-of-rottenrow/

Bullet holes are said to be found on the walls today, but after extensive searching I was unable to locate them. Photos on Google are inconclusive at best.

Finally, some more photos of the Drygate and Cathedral Square as they are today;

Evangelical Church, Cathedral Square




Cathedral Square




Hawick_1987

Cathedral Square




Barony Hall


North Drygate


Hawick_1987

Back Lane - John Knox Street



Parts of old garden wall on Drygate


Drygate



Drygate from Necropolis
clarkfield

Hawick_1987 wrote:
Prison Walls, Duke Street at John Knox Street 1959


Prison Walls, Duke Street at John Knox Street 2012


A roofer working on Tennent's new brewery looking NW up Drygate 1950


Prison Yard 19??


As a rough guide to the date, the Imp police van's reg No. is for 1968.
Bob
James

Excellent stuff, Hawick_1987.



James H
cybers

Hawick were you and Norrie cellies in the prison .... He's too wee to look ooty the  window for the memories and you seem to have a war chest of images :)

Fantastic  
Hawick_1987

clarkfield wrote:
As a rough guide to the date, the Imp police van's reg No. is for 1968.
Bob


Thanks for the update Bob  
Hawick_1987

cybers wrote:
Hawick were you and Norrie cellies in the prison .... He's too wee to look ooty the  window for the memories and you seem to have a war chest of images :)

Fantastic  


Cellmates - no, UG squaddies - aye!  

Cheers for the positive feedback guys  
Doog Doog

Cracking stuff,Hawick.
Hawick_1987

A few odds and sods from the People's Palace (29/09/12)

Original cell door


The deid bell


Children's song
Hawick_1987

Upgrades to the Drygate complex (16/02/13)








Marti

Found this, thought it would be of interest to this thread...

http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&...FQjCNH_ImBjPHlphoOdjoLzc3V1jnrEJA
James

Overlay.




James H
Alex Glass

This is a great thread full of interesting information, photographs old and new and very consise.

Hope to add something when I get back from holiday.

Well done Hawick  
Hawick_1987

Alex Glass wrote:
This is a great thread full of interesting information, photographs old and new and very consise.

Hope to add something when I get back from holiday.

Well done Hawick  


Much obliged Alex. There has been a lot of work done to the Drygate recently and I've yet to see the artifacts in the Police Museum too, so plenty to add in the coming months!

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