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Alex Glass

Dunblane

Not far from Glasgow there is a lot to see in Dunblane and a few good small walks for those who like the outdoors.

Dunblane Short History

The main feature is Dunblane Cathedral

CATHEDRAL SQUARE, DUNBLANE CATHEDRAL (CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF ST BLAAN AND ST LAURENCE INCLUDING CHURCHYARD, BOUNDARY WALL AND RICCARTON'S STILE) (Ref:26361)



This building is in the Stirling Council and the Dunblane Burgh. It is a category A building and was listed on 05/10/1971.

Mainly mid-late 13th century with mid 12th century and later tower; restored 1889 by Sir Robert Rowand Anderson. Cathedral church, largely of early Gothic (largely First Pointed) design (with some alterations); 8-bay aisled nave with square-plan Romanesque tower (later upper storeys Gothic) short octagonal spire to S; lower Lady Chapel (originally chapter house) projects to N of choir. Coursed dressed yellow sandstone (red sandstone to tower) with ashlar dressings. Moulded tiered base course; plain base course to tower. Cill band at lower level to choir, nave and aisles; bracketed eaves bands; parapet to choir. Bays divided externally by shallow buttresses; those to clerestorey of nave and N side of choir gableted at apex; those to S side of choir surmounted by plain tapered pinnacles. Windows largely gothic/pointed-arched with hoodmoulds and splayed reveals. Coped gables.TOWER: 6-stage, projecting to right of centre of S aisle. Band course at base of each stage, parapet with angle bartisans at apex. Narrow round-arched window to centre of 1st stage of S and W elevations; narrow rectangular window to each of outer faces (S, W and E) to 2nd stage; slightly larger round-arched window (divided into 2 round-arched lights by central shaft with plain capital and base to each face above, upper 2 storeys added circa 1500. Y-traceried bipartite windows to each face to each of upper 2 storeys (except possibly to N side of lower storey); those to lower stage obscured by later clock faces. Coat-of-arms of Bishop James Chisholm to parapet .NAVE: 8-bay; lean-to aisle roofs projecting length of nave to either side; generally with single round-arched mullioned quadripartite (with pointed plate tracery lights) to each bay of aisle and pair of smaller pointed-arched windows to clerestorey above, some with transitional plate/bar tracery. Large transitional plate/bar-traceried gabled window breaking eaves at E end of aisle on both sides (creating transept-like appearance); that to S more sophisticated with clustered shafts forming mullions. Large plain replacement mullioned segmental-headed tripartites to 2 bays to outer right of aisle to N elevation. 3rd and 4th bays from right to S side occupied by tower at aisle level. Entrances to penultimate bay from right to S elevation and to 3rd bay from right to N elevation; each with moulded gothic archways with flanking nook-shafts set diagonally and late 19th century 2-leaf boarded timber doors with strap hinges. Smaller pointed-arched entrance, surmounted (at aisle level) by small round-arched bipartite to penultimate bay from left to S side. Pointed-arched mullioned bipartite to right return of S aisle (N aisle adjoins Lady Chapel).CHOIR: 6-bay. N ELEVATION: Lady Chapel projects 5 bays to right, as continuation of nave aisle; segmental-headed/pointed-arched mullioned tripartite to each bay (arch of those to outer flanking bays more steeply pitched); pair of small lancet windows above to 2 bays to outer left and penultimate bay to right. Slightly projecting stack breaking eaves, incorporating 2-tier gableted buttress between 2 bays to outer right; 3 octagonal upper storeys, panelled. Outer flanking buttresses wider; that to right (adjoining nave aisle) incorporating small lancet window. Round-arched mullioned tripartite to left return; irregular pointed-arched mullioned tripartite above. Pointed-arched mullioned tripartite set back at clerestorey level to each bay to main body of choir. Tall window with geometric bar tracery (15th century with late 19th century tracery) to outer left bay. S ELEVATION: tall window with geometric bar tracery (15th century with late 19th century tracery) to each bay; dividing buttresses surmounted by plain pinnacles (circa 1500 and bearing crest of Bishop Chisholm).E END: large central window with geometric bar tracery and clustered shafts forming mullions (15th century with late 19th century tracery); narrow flanking lights. Projecting eaves-level buttresses to either side flanked by buttresses at right angles; surmounted by tall 15th century pinnacles with spire-like caps. Cross finial to gable.W END: central pointed-arched entrance with deep splayed reveals; late 19th century 2-leaf boarded timber door with elaborate strap hinges. Flanking blind pointed arches, each with trefoiled head; both supported on carved shafts. Arcade of 3 tall pointed-arched windows above; each with transitional tracery. Vesica, reveal carved with foliage to gablehead (with cross finial). Flanking eaves-height buttresses to nave; that to left forming part of square-plan stair tower with pyramid roof;. End walls of aisles set back to either side; both with shallow gables.Grey slate roofs. Fixed leaded light windows, most of larger ones with stained glass. Cast-iron down pipes and hoppers probably dating from late 19th century restoration.INTERIOR: retains some early fixtures and monuments and much fine stained glass and woodwork of late 19th/early 20th century date. Vaulted timber roofs to aisle and choir (both originally timber-roofed); that to nave (1893 during restoration of cathedral) decorated with bosses representing coats-of-arms of feudal patrons of cathedral. Stone vaulting (series of 5 groin vaults) to Lady Chapel; bosses carved with foliage. Stone pointed ribbed barrel vault at base of tower. CHOIR: timber choir screen by Sir Robert Rowand Anderson, 1889-93. Organ case adapted to accommodate 1989 Flentrop organ. Communion table incorporating ogee-headed panels by Sir Robert Rowand Anderson. Some 15th century choir stalls commissioned by Bishop Ochiltree (1429-47) flanking communion table with carved misericords including bat, dragon, green man and thistle motifs. Aumbry to S wall; moulded pointed-arched recess with nook shafts to N wall incorporating tomb with effigy of Bishop, thought to be Clement (builder of cathedral and bishop from 1233-58). S windows by Louis Davis E window depicting life of Christ and 4 Old Testament prophets by Charles E Kempe. LADY CHAPEL (formerly Chapter House): converted to war memorial circa 1918. Timber panelling. Stained glass windows by Douglas Strachan and Gordon Webster. NAVE: bays divided by piers comprising clustered shafts with bell capitals supporting pointed arches with finely moulded reveals. Clerestorey forming unbroken arcade; windows of similar design to external ones with transitional plate/bar tracery but also with clustered piers to vertical shafts. Octagonal pulpit and sounding board by Rowand Anderson,1889-93. Large brass pulpit on octagonal base with lions at base; probably later 19th century. Pews by Sir Robert Lorimer. Canopied choir stalls of circa 1500 (commissioned by Bishop James Chisholm) flanking W entrance. Carved stone font bearing date 1879 (in SW corner) by Rowand Anderson. Great Bell (founded 1612, recast 1660 and 1809) and Lesser Bell (founded 1687, recast 1723) situated in N aisle. West window depicting Tree of Jesse, 1906, by Clayton and Bell of London. E window of N aisle, Compassion of Christ, 1968 by Gordon Webster. W window of S aisle, Baptism of Christ, 1926, by Douglas Strachan; adjacent window, St George and Hope, 1915, by Louis Davis; 2 windows to left, Departure and Arrival (based on 'Nunc Dimittis'), 1917 by Louis Davis. 2 windows at E end of S aisle by Charles E Kempe, other depicting saints, orChrist/as Good Shepherd. Wrought-iron pendant light fittings, 1935. CLEMENT CHAPEL: small chamber with quadripartite rib vault at W end of S aisle; dedicated as chapel 1964; small stained glass window, Bishop Clement by Gordon Webster, 1964; brass bas relief, Christ in Majesty by Maxwell Allan, 1964.Grey slate roofs. Fixed leaded glass windows, larger ones with stained glass. Rainwater goods appear to largely date from late 19th century restoration (one of hoppers dated 1890).CHURCHYARD AND BOUNDARY WALL: low rubble boundary wall with rounded and ridged coping, largely late 19th century; some taller sections with slab coping. Pointed-arched gateway, Riccarton's Stile, to E side; 1814 by William Stirling. Churchyard contains several interesting 18th century gravestones, including to Lennox family carved with skull and crossbones and cherub. Various 19th century cast-iron gravestones. 2 lantern standards flanking E end and one by S gateway; all comprising ashlar shafts surmounted by cast/wrought-iron posts with lanterns at apex; that to S more elaborate with cast-iron post, possibly by Lorimer (early 20th century).

Notes
A very fine and largely intact early gothic cathedral. John Ruskin wrote of it in 1853 "I know not anything so perfect in its simplicity and so beautiful, as far as it reaches, in all the Gothic with which I am acquainted". The W end has been particularly admired ("one of the finest parts of the cathedral" according to McGibbon and Ross). The cathedral is also notable for its retention of a number of carved timber choir stalls of 15th century date; and also for its fine late 19th and early 20th century stained glass and various interior fittings by Sir Robert Rowand Anderson and Sir Robert Lorimer. The tracery in the choir was removed by James Gillespie Graham in 1817-19 and was subsequently replaced during the restoration of the cathedral in the late 19th century. Following the Reformation of the Church of Scotland in 1560 the choir became the parish church and the nave fell out of use, its roof falling in by about 1600. Some minor restoration work was carried out on the choir in 1872 and between 1889 and 1893 a major restoration of the whole church was carried out by Sir Robert Rowand Anderson.

References
D MacGibbon and T Ross, THE ECCLESIASTICAL ARCHITECTURE OF SCOTLAND, VOL II (1971 facsimile of 1896 publication) pp 86-112. C McKean, STIRLING AND THE TROSSACHS (1985, reprinted 1994) pp81-83. DUNBLANE CATHEDRAL (booklet published by Society of Friends ofDunblane Cathedral(1987, 2nd Edition 1993). P Galloway, THE CATHEDRALS OF SCOTLAND (2000) pp 46-51.

Crown copyright, Historic Scotland



Alex Glass

Andy Murray

Dunblane is the home town of Britain's World No.2 Tennis player Andy Murray.

As a Gold medalist in the London Olympics a post box in the town was painted gold.



Alex Glass

HIGH STREET, ST BLANE'S CHURCH (CHURCH OF SCOTLAND) (Ref:263

HIGH STREET, ST BLANE'S CHURCH (CHURCH OF SCOTLAND) (Ref:26386)





This building is in the Stirling Council and the Dunblane Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 28/10/1976.

W H, J W and J Hay, 1853-54. Cruciform-plan; 4-bay church. Gothic Revival design with flowing tracery to windows and 2-stage square-plan tower with broached spire at SE corner; basement at W end. Coursed lightly stugged/snecked sandstone rubble with sandstone ashlar dressings. Base course to ground floor; moulded eaves cornice. Pointed-arched traceried windows to nave and transepts. Chamfered surrounds/long and short surrounds to openings; quoins at arrises. Coped gables with fleur-de-lis finials.S (ENTRANCE) ELEVATION: rectangular-plan gabled porch projects to outer right; pointed-arched entrance with hoodmould with foliate ball-stops; entrance to church set back; 2-leaf boarded timber door with strapwork hinges. Window to each of 2 bays of nave set back to left; bays divided by buttress. Gable of transept projects to outer left; large central window. Tower to far right at re-entrant to right of entrance porch.TOWER: lancet window to E and S of lower stages. Upper stage recessed slightly; pair of pointed-headed cusped louvered vents (N not visible). Decorative eaves cornice with carved motifs at intervals and carved heads projecting at arrises. Stone, gabled lucarnes to spire.E ELEVATION: large window to gable end. Horizontal band of 5 trefoils below; flanking buttresses. Tower set back to outer left.N ELEVATION: tall gabled window breaking eaves to outer left. Window to each of 2 bays of nave to right (bays divided by buttress and one to left); pointed-headed entrance adjoins to right, 2-leaf boarded timber door with strap hinges. Gable of transept projects to outer right; large central window.W ELEVATION: pentagonal apse projects to centre of gable end; shoulder-arched windows (bipartite with some tracery) to angled intermediate faces. Pointed-headed entrance (boarded timber door with strap hinges) to outer left face. Angular trefoil window set back to apex of gable. Plainer openings to corresponding places to basement (windows mullioned bipartites). Basement entrance to left transept.Fixed leaded lights, including several stained glass windows. Grey slate roof incorporating horizontal bands of fishscale slates. Ashlar roof to spire.INTERIOR: fine arch-braced roof with tie beam and diagonal struts; diagonally boarded sarking. Roof timbers decorated with geometric stencilling. Tiered gallery to E side (over entrance vestibule, created circa 1980). Boarded timber dado, timber pews. 2 early 20th century stained glass windows (St Margaret and St Andrew) to S of nave; formerly in Leighton Church, Hailing. 1996 Memorial window (toDunblanemassacre) to S transept by Roland Mitton. 2 windows representing 4 seasons in apse also by Mitton (1995). Octagonal pulpit and octagonal font, both with some carved Gothic Revival decoration. Organ by Peter Conacher, 1860 (formerly in Dennyloanhead Church). Communion table and chairs circa 1934. Tower contains bell by John Wilson of the Gorbals Brass Foundry, Glasgow, inscribed 'JOHN C WILSON, FOUNDER, GLASGOW, 1854'. Apse/chancel formerly vestry; opened up late 20th century.BOUNDARY WALL: rubble boundary wall with ridged coping, partially surmounted by replacement railings. Replacement gates with wrought-iron panels to principal entrance.

Notes
Ecclesiastic building in use as such. A fine mid 19th century Gothic Revival church of solid appearance. It has a particularly impressive open timber roof. It was built as a Free Church and is unusually traditional and decorative in appearance for a church of that denomination. It appears to have replaced an earlier Free Church, built on the opposite side of the road following the Disruption of 1843. In 1929 all of Dunblane's churches united under the Church of Scotland. The Free Church became the 'East Church'. In 1951 it amalgamated with the former Leighton Church on Haining, the congregation of the latter moving to what became 'St Blane's'.

References
1st Edition County Series OS MAP; 1/2500 (1866) Alexander Barty, THE HISTORY OF DUNBLANE (1944) pp 260 & 306; Charles McKean, STIRLING AND THE TROSSACHS, AN ILLUSTRATED ARCHITECTURAL GUIDE (1985, reprinted 1994) p85; undated Church of Scotland LEAFLETS, 'St Blane's Church - Visitors Guide' and 'The Organs of St Blane's Church'.

Crown copyright, Historic Scotland
Alex Glass

PERTH ROAD, ST MARY'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH INCLUDING GATEPIERS A

PERTH ROAD, ST MARY'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH INCLUDING GATEPIERS AND BOUNDARY WALL (Ref:26404)





This building is in the Stirling Council and the Dunblane Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 05/10/1971.

John Henderson, 1843 with later additions. Rectangular-plan, plain, gabled gothic church, aligned E-W, with bellcote to E. Stepped, clasping buttresses. Base course, continuous window impost height string course, moulded eaves course. Saw-tooth coped skews, gabletedskewputts. Pointed-arch windows, chamfered reveals, deep pitched cills.S (ENTRANCE) ELEVATION: 4-bay, regular fenestration, steeply pitched gabled entrance porch to outer left; diagonal clasping buttresses flanking stone steps to pointed-arch entrance, double roll-moulded to reveal, engaged columns with foliate capitals; modern timber door and fanlight, pointed-arch ventilation slit to gablehead; pointed segmental-arched inner entrance within inscribed pointed-arch, dated 1843 above; 2-leaf, boarded timber door with strap hinges.N (SIDE) ELEVATION: 4-bay, regular fenestration, later addition to NE corner; 3-light window, harled, slated piended roof.E (END) ELEVATION: stepped tripartite lancet window, continuous cill course.W (END) ELEVATION: single storey, gabled chancel abutting to centre, stepped tripartite to centre.Leaded windows. Grey slates, lead flashing. Cast-iron rainwater goods. INTERIOR: plain, whitewashed interior; ashlar margin to pointed-archway to chancel, engaged columns with plain capitals supporting arch. Stone corbels supporting exposed roof beams. Stone steps to chancel. Stone pulpit and font.

Notes
Ecclesiastical building in use as such. St Mary's church was consecrated by the Episcopal Bishop of St Andrews, Dunkeld andDunblaneon 28th May 1845.

References
C McKean, STIRLING AND THE TROSSACHS AN ILLUSTRATED ARCHITECTURAL GUIDE, 1994, p 85. A Barty, THE HISTORY OF DUNBLANE, 1994, p 254.

Crown copyright, Historic Scotland
Alex Glass

PERTH ROAD, DUNBLANE HYRDO HOTEL INCLUDING HYDRO LODGE, NEWT

PERTH ROAD, DUNBLANE HYRDO HOTEL INCLUDING HYDRO LODGE, NEWTON COTTAGE, GATEPIERS AND BOUNDARY WALL (Ref:26409)



This building is in the Stirling Council and the Dunblane Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 05/10/1971.


Peddie and Kinnear, 1875-6 with later additions and alterations. 4-storey, 17-bay, symmetrical Italianate hotel with 7-stage entrance tower with belvedere to centre and terminating in symmetrical pyramidally-roofed, 5-storey, blocks. Yellow ashlar sandstone. Base course, projecting, cill height, dividing cill bands, eaves course. Gabled roof with timber bracketed, barge boarded, overhanging eaves. Plain, projecting margins to openings. W (PRINCIPAL) ELEVATION: 7-stage engaged entrance tower to centre; advanced porte-cochere to ground floor with raised quoins, framing stone steps to main entrance, modern steel and glass portico to front of porch; stone-mullioned, bipartite windows to 2nd, 3rd and canopied 4th stage with small window to 5th stage above; clock faces to 6th stage flanked by small attic bays; free-standing 7th stage, tall semicircular-arched openings to belvedere, plain corner piers supporting low pyramidal roof. Symmetrical flanking 5-bay blocks; advanced, cast-iron structure arcade to ground floor with lean-to roof; regular fenestration to upper floors; semicircular-headed roof dormers; 3-storey, advanced, canted bays centre. 4-storey with attic, 3-bay outer pavilion blocks with pyramidal roofs; regular fenestration except bipartite windows to 1st floor. E (REAR) ELEVATION: irregular fenestration, multiple advanced, 3-bay, gable ends, large advanced bay to outer left. Single storey modern additions running full length.N (SIDE) ELEVATION: 6-bay, divided into 2, 3-bay blocks, regular fenestration. Advanced, 2-storey dining wing, added 1884; canted central bay flanked by bay to left abutting modern glazed dining room extension, bowed bay to right; mullioned and transomed windows; balustraded parapet. S (SIDE) ELEVATION: 9-bay, divided into 3, 3-bay blocks, regular fenestration; 2-storey, advanced canted bay to block to left, modern addition to ground; canopied entrance to centre block; gable end of 2-storey, 9-bay elongated modern wing abutting block to right.Predominantly 4-pane, timber-framed, sash and case windows. Grey slates, lead flashing. Cast-iron rainwater goods.INTERIOR: restored and refurbished 1ate 1990s; ornate original plasterwork retained to public rooms on ground floor, excluding remodelled ball room to rear, tapered pilasters applied to walls of S function room of particular note.SOUTH LODGE: single storey, 3-bay, rectangular plan lodge. Piended, slate roof with gables breaking eaves. W facing, bipartite windows flanking door to centre with large gable above, oculi to gablehead, pierced barge boarding to gable terminating in carved medallions. Central door to rear elevation, flanking windows, 2 small roof dormers. Blank sides with gables breaking eaves. Plain interior.WEST LODGE: 3-bay, asymmetrical, gabled lodge. N facing. Yellow ashlar sandstone, overhanging eaves with exposed rafters. 2-storey, bay to left with advanced canted bay to ground floor with corbelled roof, window above. Single storey, 2 bays to right; single window to left; open, gabled timber porch to right, recessed entrance. Advanced canted window to Perth Road gable end, blind to E end, rear not seen 2001, interior not seen 2001.GATEPIERS AND BOUNDARY WALL: pair of square-plan, ashlar piers; plinth, chamfered column, projecting cornice, swept cap terminating in ball finial. Low, coped, rubble wall to Perth Road, high, coped, rubble wall to Newton Loan.

Notes
Through their vast architectural output Peddie and Kinnear held pre-eminence throughout the late 19th century as Scotland's foremost practice. Working in various style from Scots Baronial to classicism and Italianate, as at the Hydro. The design of the Hydro is reminiscent of the great 19th century hotels of the Venetian Lido. Despite its scale the Hydro retains a remarkable cohesion to its Palladian, hierarchical formula. The origins of the Hyrdopathic Hotel lie with Dr Peter Gordon Stewart, a surgeon in Dunblane, who in 1839 published a treatise on the properties of the town's mineral springs, "which like the Philosopher's Stone had been represented?as capable of curing all diseases?and even of wooing the mind to sanity when the wild delirium comes and weeping friends are strangers." TheDunblaneHyrdopathic Company, founders of the hotel, rented the mineral wells and for some years water was brought up to the hotel for the guests. The hotel opened in September 1878 based up a joint stock company made up of wealthy traders and business men principally from Dunblane, Stirling and Edinburgh. However, the venture was not a success and the hotel went into receivership in 1884 and was bought by the Cockburn Hotel, Edinburgh for 16,000 (original cost of 60,000). The hotel has continued in business ever since and is today within the Hilton hotel group.

References
Dick Peddie and Kinnear Collection, RCAHMS. C McKean, STIRLING AND THE TROSSACHS AN ILLUSTRATED ARCHITECTURAL GUIDE, 1994, p 87. A Barty, THE HISTORY OF DUNBLANE, 1994, p 274.

Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.

















fastnet

Nice pics and great information Alex.
sputnik

yeah,thanks for that.
Alex Glass

STIRLING ROAD, STIRLING ARMS INCLUDING BOUNDARY WALL (Ref:26

STIRLING ROAD, STIRLING ARMS INCLUDING BOUNDARY WALL (Ref:26414)

This building is in the Stirling Council and the Dunblane Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 28/10/1976.




1770, extended 1905. 3-storey with attic, 3-bay, rectangular-plan, gabled hotel with Dutch gable. Harled, squared and tooled red sandstone to front, rubble to sides and rear with yellow sandstone rybats. Painted short quoins, base course, dividing band between 2nd and 3rd storeys, moulded eaves course. Painted, architraved windows with projecting cills. N (PRINCIPAL) ELEVATION: timber-panelled door to centre flanked by narrow windows, single windows to outer bays. Regular fenestration to 2nd storey. Window to centre of 3rd storey flanked by canted oriel windows with piended roofs. Dutch gable breaking eaves to centre with wallhead stack to apex; attic window to gablehead, projecting stone balcony with decorative, cast-iron balustrade; small inset panel above bearing carved and painted Saltire; canted dormers flanking gable, piended roofs, cast-iron finials.S (REAR) ELEVATION: 2-storey with basement, 2-bay advanced bay to rear with piended roof; single window to ground floor, right, wallhead stack. 3-bay returns; advanced piended bay to right of right return, door to centre bay; regular fenestration to left return, canted roof dormer to left.E (SIDE) ELEVATION: timber-panelled door to right, flanked by pilasters supporting projecting pediment. Small window to centre, between 2nd and 3rd storey, former gablehead.W (SIDE) ELEVATION: slightly irregular fenestration.Plate glass, timber-framed, sash and case windows. Grey slates, lead flashing. Cast-iron rainwater goods. Coped gable stacks. Overhanging eaves, barge boarded to gable ends. INTERIOR: largely refurbished but with several original features retained; simple plasterwork cornices; 19th century Adam-style fireplace to saloon; 19th century cast-iron balusters and polished timber handrail to central staircase; carved panel above blocked door in bar bearing obscured inscription, 2 coats-of-arms and the initials, IP and ID.BOUNDARY WALL: low, rubble wall encircling exposed basement to SE.

Notes
An importantDunblanelandmark next to the Allan water with prospects north to the High Street and Mill Row, an inn has been present on the site since the 17th century. With the growth of wealth and visitors to the town, following the arrival of the train station just across the Bridge of Dunblane, the hotel was extended from a typical 2-storey, symmetrical, 'Georgian' box to 3 storeys with an excellent Dutch gable in 1905. Different sized and coloured quoins to the 3rd storey can be seen from the side elevations. Robert Burns is believed to have stayed at the Stirling Arms Hotel in 1787, when the tenant was a Mr Wetherby, penning the song 'my bonny was a gallant gay' whilst in residence, suggesting the lower part of the building to date from some time before this.

References
C McKean, STIRLING AND THE TROSSACHS AN ILLUSTRATED ARCHITECTURAL GUIDE, 1994, p 86. A Barty, THE HISTORY OF DUNBLANE, 1994, p 254. A McKerracher, THE STREET AND PLACE NAMES OF DUNBLANE, 1992, p 14.

Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.


Alex Glass

Memorial Garden The Children and Teacher of Dunblane

Not wishing to dwell on this dit too much but it is a part od Dunblane's history now.

Dunblane Massacre

Memorial Garden










Alex Glass

HIGH STREET, BALHALDIE HOUSE INCLUDING GATEPIERS AND BOUNDAR

HIGH STREET, BALHALDIE HOUSE INCLUDING GATEPIERS AND BOUNDARY WALL (Ref:26387)

This building is in the Stirling Council and the Dunblane Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 05/10/1971.



Late 17th century with early 19th century additions and alterations. 2-storey, 6-bay, rectangular-plan, gabled house. Random rubble red sandstone with yellow ashlar quoins and margins to openings. Painted architraves and projecting cills to windows. E (PRINCIPAL) ELEVATION: 6-bay, regular fenestration. Blocked window to ground floor of outer left bay; plain door with letterbox fanlight to 3rd bay from left; 2-storey advanced canted bay with piended roof to 4th bay from left; small window between outer right bay and bay to immediate left.W (REAR) ELEVATION: regular fenestration, smaller windows to upper storey. 2-storey, advanced bay to outer left; cast-iron spiral staircase to right return, 1st floor door; hipped roof.S (HIGH STREET) ELEVATION: gable end; regular fenestration to right, timber-panelled door to right, letterbox fanlight.N (SIDE) ELEVATION: set into bank; exposed upper storey, harled gable end with small barred window to right.12-pane, timber-framed, sash and case windows. Grey slates, lead flashing. Cast-iron rainwater goods. Broad, coped gable end and ridge stacks, coped skews to S.INTERIOR: timber panelled doors, plain plasterwork throughout. Central full-height stair well, cast-iron balsutrade to banister. Principal drawing room to left on 1st floor; false doors for symmetry, combed ceiling. Cobbled floor to basement.GATEPIERS AND BOUNDARY WALL: small, square-plan, chamfered piers with plinths and pyramidal caps. Stepped, high rubble wall to left of house with in-built square-headed gate, stone lintel.

Notes
Balhaldie House was the town residence of the MacGregors of Balhaldie. Through to the mid 18th century the Drummonds of Balhaldie were the most powerful family in Dunblane. The family were descendants of the Chief of the MacGregors who assumed the name Drummond when MacGregor was proscribed by Act of Parliament in the 17th century. It is believed that James Graham of Claverhouse stayed at Balhaldie when he stopped at Dunblane, to confer with the Royalist Alexander Drummond, on his march north and Bonnie Prince Charlie stayed on his way south in 1745. The Drummonds owned the estate of Cromlix to the north of Dunblane, the lands of Ramoyle, numerous properties in the town as well as the family estate of Balhaldie. The house was originally entered from Sinclair's Wynd prior to the formation of Cross Street in 1840. The 19th century addition to the east was added as an office for a local solicitor/postmaster, Mr Bain, the post having arrived along Perth Road by mail coach.

References
C McKean, STIRLING AND THE TROSSACHS AN ILLUSTRATED ARCHITECTURAL GUIDE, 1994, p 86. A Barty, THE HISTORY OF DUNBLANE, 1994, p 156 & 254.

Crown copyright, Historic Scotland






fastnet

The saddest thing I have ever done was walk around that graveyard.
Alex Glass

Dunblane Shops etc

Tickety-boo


Post Office


Houses



Police Station



Riverside Rock Garden









The Village Inn





Alex Glass

Dunblane War Memorial & Memorial Bridge

Dunblane War Memorial & Memorial Bridge

Situated across the Allan River from Dunblane Cathedral and accessable via the Memorial Bridge build by 2 Troop, 53 Field Squadron (Air Support) 39 Engineer Regiment in October 2007. Unfortunately the River Wall along the Path has collapsed and the bridge is not accessible from the Cathedral side.



The Bridge













Alex Glass

THE CROSS, LEIGHTON LIBRARY (Ref:26371)

THE CROSS, LEIGHTON LIBRARY (Ref:26371)

This building is in the Stirling Council and the Dunblane Burgh. It is a category A building and was listed on 05/10/1971.



James Robinson of Park of Keir (Chamberlain to Lord Strathallan), Clerk of Works, 1684-87; restored by Honeyman, Jack and Robertson, mid 1980's. Single storey and basement; rectangular-plan; former clerics' library; with crowstepped gables; large round-arched windows to ground floor and vesica-shaped panel to E elevation; basement vaulted. Harled with sandstone ashlar dressings. 2 windows to W side with moulded architraves. E (ENTRANCE) ELEVATION: forestair to architraved entrance to right of library (railings late 20th century); oak door (presented 1924). Entrance to left return of forestair and adjacent basement entrance set back to left; both with boarded timber doors. Near-central vesica-shaped panel with moulded architrave to principal floor; containing marble cartouche and coat-of-arms of Bishop Leighton.W ELEVATION: projecting ledge above most of basement; entrance to right of centre; boundary wall of manse projects at right angles to right. 2 large round-arched windows to principal floor.S ELEVATION: round-arched window to left of principal elevation. 2 small lights to gable.N ELEVATION: blank gable end. Boundary wall of manse projects at right angles to left of basement.INTERIOR: single-roomed main floor lined with book cases, some fitted. Boarded timber ceiling with decorative timber air vents. Vaulted basement appears to originally have contained windows. 15-pane timber sash and case windows. Grey slate roof. Gablehead stack; both coped; one gabled; cans missing.

Notes
Thought to be the oldest extant purpose-built library in Scotland. A well-preserved late 17th century building, incorporating some interesting features, notably the vesica-shaped plaque with its sophisticated marble Baroque inset on the E elevation and the round-arched windows. It is unusual that the collection it houses has been preserved largely intact and many of its library furnishings also. It was built as a bequest of Robert Leighton, a former Bishop of Dunblane, who died in 1684. He left his book collection 'to the Cathedrall of Dunblane in Scotland to remain there for the use of the Clergie of the diocese', together with a sum of ?100 to provide a room to house them. Lord Strathallan assisted with the practical arrangements, including the transportation of materials, and his chamberlain, James Robison, was responsible for the overall design of the building and settling the contracts for the work. The marble tablet (originally inscribed 'Bibliotheca Leightoniana') however appears to have been Lord Strathallan's idea. The final cost of the building was just over ?162, the balance being made up by Bishop Leighton's sister, Sapphira Lightmaker and her son, Edward. They subsequently contributed a further ?300 to provide a salary for the librarian and money for repair and maintenance. The vaulted basement was to be the librarian's house. The first librarian was Robert Douglas, a former minister and the son of the last Bishop of Dunblane. Most subsequent librarians appear to have also been parish schoolmasters. From 1734 until around the mid 19th century, when demand ceased, it functioned as a subscription lending library (according to the New Statistical Account of 1845 it had 'recently been refitted as a subscription reading room'). It was closed from the mid 1850's until 1989, when it re-opened following its restoration. It continues to be run by Trustees. Bishop Leighton's original collection of approximately 1400 books increased over the years to about 4500 and the collection contains some very rare early printed books. 'Twelve chairs of turkie red lether' bought in 1688 still in situ; also early table with drawers.

References
THE NEW STATISTICAL ACCOUNT OF SCOTLAND, VOL X (1845) pp1039-1040. A Barty, THE HISTORY OF DUNBLANE, 1992, pp112-17. C McKean, STIRLING AND THE TROSSACHS, AN ILLUSTRATED ARCHITECTURAL GUIDE, 1994, p 85; undated leaflet by Trustees of Leighton Library.

Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.


Alex Glass

HIGH STREET, DUNBLANE PUBLIC LIBRARY (Ref:48951)

HIGH STREET, DUNBLANE PUBLIC LIBRARY (Ref:48951)

This building is in the Stirling Council and the Dunblane Burgh. It is a category C building and was listed on 17/10/2002



Dated 1907. Single storey, 6-bay, H-plan, gabled, former institutional building now library. Bull-faced yellow sandstone with ashlar margins, harled to sides and rear. Coped, stepped gables. Chamfered reveals to windows.W (PRINCIPAL) ELEVATION: stone-mullioned, bipartite window flanked by single windows to centre left; broad segmentally-arched entrance to right of central bay, moulded reveal, keystone, moulded cornice over, broad 2-leaf timber doors, glazed fanlight. Slightly advanced gabled bay to outer left; large, mullioned and transomed, 4-centred-arched window to centre, flanked by tall, corniced windows; panel inscribed 'CHURCH HALL' to gablehead; single storey entrance porch abutting to outer left, steps to broad 2-leaf door, blocked parapet. Slightly advanced gabled bay to right; stone mullioned bipartite window to centre within projecting margin, segmentally-arched panel above inscribed 'DUNBLANE INSTITUTE', flanked by single windows, 1907 date stone to gablehead.E (REAR) ELEVATION: advanced gabled bay to left, advanced bay with piended roof to right, link wall between to form rear service yard. N (SIDE) ELEVATION: 3-bay, regular fenestration, small single storey, advanced block to outer right. Single bay, piended roof, projection abutting outer left.S (SIDE) ELEVATION: 5-bay, regular fenestration.Stylised 5-pane, timber, sash and case windows except leaded glass in bay to left. Grey slates, lead flashing. Cast-iron rainwater goods. INTERIOR: good quality plasterwork to ceilings. Glazed, timber-framed entrance screen to lobby.

Notes
Formerly the Dunblane Institute and Church Hall. Built on the former vegetable garden of Balhaldie House (see separate listing) the building was funded by the Dunblane Reading Room and Amusement Association who rejected a generous offer from Andrew Carnegie.

References
A Barty, THE HISTORY OF DUNBLANE, 1994, p 254. A McKerracher, THE STREET AND PLACE NAMES OF DUNBLANE, 1992, p 16.

Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.



Alex Glass

ALLAN WATER, DUNBLANE RAILWAY VIADUCT (Ref:26425)

ALLAN WATER, DUNBLANE RAILWAY VIADUCT (Ref:26425)

This building is in the Stirling Council and the Dunblane Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 05/09/1971



Lock and Errington, 1846-48. 4-arch, 3-pier skew railway viaduct. Bull-faced yellow sandstone courses with ashlar margins cladding brick structure. V-section cutwaters and impost-height string course to piers, Blocked soffits and arch rings to spandrels, coped brick parapet. Arch to east bank thrown across road, outer abutment embedded into steep bank at impost level.

Notes
Prior to the construction of the viaduct the only route across the Allan Water was the old Bridge of Dunblane which until 1849 was a poorly maintained mediaeval structure (see separate listing). The construction of the line of the Scottish Central Railway northwards through Dunblane on its way to Perth in 1846 made many additional changes to the fundamental changes to the town, most notably dividing the historic centre in two and facilitating the growth of villas to the east of the town in the mid to late nineteenth century.

References
A Barty, THE HISTORY OF DUNBLANE, 1994, P.254.

Crown copyright, Historic Scotland
Alex Glass

STATION ROAD, DUNBLANE RAILWAY STATION INCLUDING ORIGINAL FO

STATION ROAD, DUNBLANE RAILWAY STATION INCLUDING ORIGINAL FOOTBRIDGE (Ref:48964)

This building is in the Stirling Council and the Dunblane Burgh. It is a category C building and was listed on 17/10/2002



William Tite, 1848. Single storey, 3-bay, T-plan, crowstepped gabled, Jacobethan station buildings. Red brick with yellow sandstone ashlar margins, painted white to station elevation. Long and short quoins, blocked architraves, chamfered to reveals.S (PRINCIPAL) ELEVATION: door to centre left, stone-mullioned bipartite window to bay to right, modern timber and plate glass addition to bay to left with projecting timber, flat-roofed canopy. Modern addition linking to formerly free standing, small gabled office to SW corner; 2-bay, regular fenestration, 3-bay, timber addition to S with slated piended roof.N (REAR) ELEVATION: advanced, gabled bay to centre; singe window and door to left return, harled to right return.E (SIDE) ELEVATION: blind gable end.W (STATION PLATFORM) ELEVATION: single window to gable end, modern flat-roofed addition linking to small gabled office to right.Predominantly 12-pane, timber-framed, sash and case windows. Grey slates, lead flashing. Cast-iron rainwater goods.INTERIOR: modern ticket office and waiting room.FOOTBRIDGE: segmentally-arched, covered, lattice plate girder footbridge; decorative gothic brackets to cast-iron piers.

Notes
Tite's station building is, despite or possibly because of its simplicity, particularly successful. The combination of crowstepped gables, ashlar quoins and brick work manages to promote a specific Scottish Central Line identity whilst at the same time sitting comfortably with the historic burgh architecture of Dunblane. The red bricks were made from a special brick works opened at Lecropt using Carse clay and were the first bricks used in central Scotland. The bricks were used for all the station along the line from Bridge of Allan to Gleneagles. The railway station and yard, extending to 4 acres, originally constituted the glebe of the parish minister, until the land was sold by the church in 1846 to allow for the construction of the Scottish Central Railway northwards throughDunblaneon its way to Perth, 1846-58. The railway made many changes to the Bridgend area of Dunblane, which was cut in two and many houses demolished to allow for its coming. Previously Bridgend had been an historic quarter ofDunblaneBurgh equivalent to Ramoyle and Braeport to the north of the town.

References
A Barty, THE HISTORY OF DUNBLANE, 1994, p 256. Additional information provided by Gordon Biddle, Gazetteer of Railway Sites.

Crown copyright, Historic Scotland









Alex Glass

STIRLING ROAD, STIRLING ARMS INCLUDING BOUNDARY WALL (Ref:26

STIRLING ROAD, STIRLING ARMS INCLUDING BOUNDARY WALL (Ref:26414)

This building is in the Stirling Council and the Dunblane Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 28/10/1976



1770, extended 1905. 3-storey with attic, 3-bay, rectangular-plan, gabled hotel with Dutch gable. Harled, squared and tooled red sandstone to front, rubble to sides and rear with yellow sandstone rybats. Painted short quoins, base course, dividing band between 2nd and 3rd storeys, moulded eaves course. Painted, architraved windows with projecting cills. N (PRINCIPAL) ELEVATION: timber-panelled door to centre flanked by narrow windows, single windows to outer bays. Regular fenestration to 2nd storey. Window to centre of 3rd storey flanked by canted oriel windows with piended roofs. Dutch gable breaking eaves to centre with wallhead stack to apex; attic window to gablehead, projecting stone balcony with decorative, cast-iron balustrade; small inset panel above bearing carved and painted Saltire; canted dormers flanking gable, piended roofs, cast-iron finials.S (REAR) ELEVATION: 2-storey with basement, 2-bay advanced bay to rear with piended roof; single window to ground floor, right, wallhead stack. 3-bay returns; advanced piended bay to right of right return, door to centre bay; regular fenestration to left return, canted roof dormer to left.E (SIDE) ELEVATION: timber-panelled door to right, flanked by pilasters supporting projecting pediment. Small window to centre, between 2nd and 3rd storey, former gablehead.W (SIDE) ELEVATION: slightly irregular fenestration.Plate glass, timber-framed, sash and case windows. Grey slates, lead flashing. Cast-iron rainwater goods. Coped gable stacks. Overhanging eaves, barge boarded to gable ends. INTERIOR: largely refurbished but with several original features retained; simple plasterwork cornices; 19th century Adam-style fireplace to saloon; 19th century cast-iron balusters and polished timber handrail to central staircase; carved panel above blocked door in bar bearing obscured inscription, 2 coats-of-arms and the initials, IP and ID.BOUNDARY WALL: low, rubble wall encircling exposed basement to SE.

Notes
An importantDunblanelandmark next to the Allan water with prospects north to the High Street and Mill Row, an inn has been present on the site since the 17th century. With the growth of wealth and visitors to the town, following the arrival of the train station just across the Bridge of Dunblane, the hotel was extended from a typical 2-storey, symmetrical, 'Georgian' box to 3 storeys with an excellent Dutch gable in 1905. Different sized and coloured quoins to the 3rd storey can be seen from the side elevations. Robert Burns is believed to have stayed at the Stirling Arms Hotel in 1787, when the tenant was a Mr Wetherby, penning the song 'my bonny was a gallant gay' whilst in residence, suggesting the lower part of the building to date from some time before this.

References
C McKean, STIRLING AND THE TROSSACHS AN ILLUSTRATED ARCHITECTURAL GUIDE, 1994, p 86. A Barty, THE HISTORY OF DUNBLANE, 1994, p 254. A McKerracher, THE STREET AND PLACE NAMES OF DUNBLANE, 1992, p 14.

Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.


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