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Dansk6270

Eglinton Street Congregational Church

While reading the Glasgow edition (1990) of the 'Buildings of Scotland' series I came upon mention of the 'Eglinton Congregational Church' situated at 341 Eglinton Street. I cycle along Eglinton Street almost every day and there are no churches extant on the street today. Consulting Canmore and the 1892-94 Glasgow Ordnance Survey map on the NLS website I managed to locate the present day site of the church which according to Canmore was demolished in January 2000. There remain today at the site only the vestiges of what look like buttresses and a retaining wall.

The Buildings of Scotland guide describes the church as possessing  "remarkable interior decoration of 1895 designed by W.J. Anderson, including the mural on the east wall, painted by J. Moodie to represent a Byzantine iconostasis, and the copper and wrought-iron coronas, made by J. Milne & Sons." The listing for the building on the Historic Environment Scotland website references "an entire East wall as a veil of gold with polychrome vertical bands in Romanesque/Byzantine style."

Does anyone in  know why this Church was demolished? I understand that it may have sat in the path of the M74 extension but that was not constructed until almost a decade after demolition. Furthermore I was wondering whether anyone was in the possession of any photographs of the interior of the church which sounds unlike any other I am familiar with in the city. Any help would be much appreciated.
Stuball

Where was it on todays map?
Dansk6270

At the corner of Eglinton Street and Devon Street.

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/55%C2%B050'47.0%22N+4%C2%B015'39.6%22W/@55.8463835,-4.2620903,227m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x0:0x0

(Copy and paste the whole URL)
Delmont St Xavier

The church is question was part of the Congregational Union of Scotland and then the Scottish Congregational Church until it merged with the United Reformed Church.

It moved around from it's humble beginnings (as often Congregational churches did)  Another nearby Church, Lloyd Morris Congregational Church was in Rutherglen Road but moved with the people to Castlemilk where it continues today (although much reduced in membership and prominence).

Eglington Street Congregational Church became Giffnock Congregational Church  and in 2000 became Giffnock URC and is a thriving church with the Rev Jake Tatton as it's minister.

http://www.giffnockurc.com/#!history/c8de
Marblez

streapadair wrote:

Eglinton St, east side, south of Cavendish St.  August 1973



Devon St, north side, west of Abbotsford Place.  August 1973

okaydoak

My memory is that for the last decades of its existence,it was used as an Orange Hall.I doubt if its interior was well maintained - I remember a Union Jack and flagpole being crudely pushed  through the glazing of the big front window.
Dansk6270

Thanks to all for the replies. Delmont St Xavier I will contact Giffnock Congregational Church in the hope that they possess some pictures of the interior. Marblez those are wonderfully evocative pictures thank you for sharing. Okaydoak that sounds like a lamentable end for such a fine building.

I was today reading Ronald Smith's 'The Gorbals - Historical Guide & Heritage Walk' (1999) in Langside Library which described the "remarkable" interior as
having been "destroyed through dry rot and water penetration." It further contains illustrations of two angel heads sculpted by John Mossman which sat above the doors of the church.

I suppose that the interior of the church had been apparently lost prior to demolition somewhat alleviates the obliteration of the entire building. Nevertheless Glasgow and especially an area so architecturally diminished can ill-afford to dispense so casually with it's built heritage.
okaydoak

The building was certainly in a pretty ropey condition prior to demolition - I can remember seeing lots of slipped slates and missing flashings on the roof,and it never had any maintenance or repairs.Additionally,because of its latter useage as a Hall and Social Club,it had been turned into a windowless fortress.

At the time it was demolished,the reason was given was that it was in the way of the proposed motorway flyover.It came down very quickly.

Look forward to seeing some interior photos,if they exist (but not holding my breath!)

Regards,
Chris.
Delmont St Xavier

Dansk6270 wrote:
Thanks to all for the replies. Delmont St Xavier I will contact Giffnock Congregational Church in the hope that they possess some pictures of the interior. Marblez those are wonderfully evocative pictures thank you for sharing. Okaydoak that sounds like a lamentable end for such a fine building.

I was today reading Ronald Smith's 'The Gorbals - Historical Guide & Heritage Walk' (1999) in Langside Library which described the "remarkable" interior as
having been "destroyed through dry rot and water penetration." It further contains illustrations of two angel heads sculpted by John Mossman which sat above the doors of the church.

I suppose that the interior of the church had been apparently lost prior to demolition somewhat alleviates the obliteration of the entire building. Nevertheless Glasgow and especially an area so architecturally diminished can ill-afford to dispense so casually with it's built heritage.


If Giffnock United Reformed Church cannot assist you with your attempts, you might want to ask the 'archives' at the National Synod to help you.  http://www.urcscotland.org.uk/

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