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Glasgow in the 1970s - East of the Cross

London Rd, west of Schipka Pass.  April 1973




London Rd, north side east of the railway bridge.  Does anything here remain?  October 1973

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Corner of Moir St and London Rd. A remarkable 6 storey tenement block, with a double bank of dormer windows.  January 1974




London Rd, north side west of Charlotte St. The Braemar is still there, the block reduced to two storeys, but the scene is almost unrecognisable.  July 1973

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Southwest corner of Charlotte St and London Rd.  January 1974




This was the last remaining unaltered house of the ten or so built in Charlotte St in the 1780s by Robert Adam, and it has been nicely restored by the  NTS, though its Jane Austen-ish air sits strangely  with the wasteland  it now looks towards.  July 1973

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Looking down Charlotte St to the McLennan Arch, in the third of its four locations.  The pediment of another Adam house can just be made out on the left, with an extra storey on top of it. One of the houses was significantly grander than the rest, that built for David Dale, industrialist and philanthropist - latterly an Eye Hospital, it stood at the bottom right-hand corner where Gillespie, Kidd and Coia’s Our Lady and St Francis school replaced it in 1964. Charlotte St, once the most desirable address in Glasgow, was a sad case in 1973, and a sadder one now: the Wise Group building next to the NTS house still turns a contemptuous shoulder to the street, the Coia building is still there, but the whole east side is vacant and an extempore car park. Are there great plans afoot? Not holding my breath.    July 1973




McLennan Arch and Charlotte St. The church halfway up on the right was built in 1864 as Trinity United Free.  July 1973

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London Rd from the chicane. Again barely recognisable now.  July 1973




Greendyke St, west side at London Rd. All gone. The pleasant sort-of-baronial building seems to have been part of St Alphonsus‘ School., which had its main entrance in Charlotte St. Beyond , turning the corner, is the easternmost extension of the Camp Coffee works, to which the chimney belongs. This was started in 1891 by R Paterson & Son in the Adam house at the south end of the east side of Charlotte St, and was such a runaway success that the next 17 years were spent in what must have been an almost continuous process of rebuilding and extending. This corner building of 1908 was the last expansion, for the invention of instant coffee powder was not far in the future, and Camp’s sales suffered. The brand has been sold on in modern times, but it is still in production (not in Glasgow) and can be found in most supermarkets, though in the home baking aisle rather than with the tea and coffee.  January 1974

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Greendyke St. Beyond St Andrew’s by  the Green  is R. Ramsay & Co.’s Hide, Wool and Tallow Auction Market and warehouse (Keppie, 1890). Having fallen into disuse, it was rescued by being converted into flats. The Homes for the Future development now starts immediately east of it.  April 1973




St Andrew’s Suspension Bridge, built in 1855 for the convenience of workers crossing the river to the factories of Hutchesontown.  December 1975

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This spectacular pile became one of these factories, when it was built in 1886 (and extended over the next 20 years) for the United Co-operative Baking Society by Bruce & Hay. The UCBS had only built their new bakery at the north corner of what are now Seaward St and Milnpark St in 1870, but demand  soon outstripped what it could supply and they had to seek pastures new.  (PS:  Is there a more elegant footbridge anywhere?)  May 1976




The imposing St Mungo Halls at McNeil St and Ballater St, largely forgotten now, were built by the UCBS as a social and entertainment facility for their vast workforce.  September 1973



December1975

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Greenhead St. Built in 1846 by Charles Wilson as Greenhead House, the McPhail mansion, this became in 1859 the Buchanan Institute, a charitable school, and from 1920 to 1975 was St Aidan’s School . Now well restored and divided into flats.  January 1974




Greenhead St, south of James St. Still looking as good as it did then.  January 1974

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Greenhead St, south of Tullis St. Also looking good, though the corner shop is gone.   January 1976




Greenhead St, south of Mill St.  Greenhead St had an air of  Bridgeton’s West End about it, and up to Mill St it has survived pretty well, but the rest  is new housing and vacant land.  January 1976

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Corner of Newhall St and Greenhead St S.E. I took a few shots of the far end of Greenhead St one afternoon, but don’t have a date for them - spring of 1975 seems likely.  



283-311 Greenhead St.

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291 Greenhead St. Unless the photo is unintentionally distorted, that wall is bulging rather badly. Maybe these fine tenements had to come down, but what I can’t understand is why the site is still vacant, with its pleasant outlook across the river to Richmond Park. It was originally known as Clydeview Terrace, before becoming part of Greenhead St.




West end of Monteith Row from Greendyke St. Like Abbotsford Place south of the river, and built around the same time, 1820-30, Monteith Row was a development aimed at professional people, and for several decades it was a desirable address, with many doctors taking residence. When a main road leading east from the cross was being laid out the obvious line would have taken it along Monteith Row to Bridgeton, but pressure from the residents led to it being diverted  to Great Hamilton St (London Rd), and the resulting chicane is still there.  January 1976

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14 Monteith Row, the Monteith Hotel (‘for Tradesmen‘). This is the last remaining fragment of the Row.  January 1976




Corner of  Monteith Place and Monteith Row.  May 1976

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15 Monteith Row.  January 1976




15 Monteith Row. There is a socket at the top of the iron arch which would once have held a lantern.  January 1976

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25-27 Monteith Row, east of Morris Place.  January 1974




London Rd, south side east of Greendyke St, opposite St Alphonsus’  RC Church. St James’s School (the name is on the panel above the roofline) and St James’s Burgh Church (date-stone 1816). It is said that the church was built by a Methodist congregation who soon found themselves financially embarrassed and had to sell the building to the Town Council in 1820.  August 1973

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Corner of Bain St and London Rd.  Gillespie U F Church.  November 1973




Foot of Claythorn St from the corner of Bankier St, with the dome of the People’s Palace beyond Morris Place.  December 1975

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Corner of Claythorn St and Moncur St.  January 1974





London Rd, north side east of Claythorn St. St Luke’s U F Church.  January 1974

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London Rd, north side west of Green St. Calton Bar about to get a new fascia.  July 1973




London Rd, north side west of Green St.  The original Calton Bar, in a building thought to date from 1767 - it is certainly older than most. I wonder if the top floor windows were originally half-dormers, lost in a re-roofing.   January 1974

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Corner of Green St and London Rd.  One of the few surviving old buildings among these shots of London Rd. The Nationalist is now the Calton Bar. The Jack House, funnily enough, sold jacks - trolley, bottle, and ratchet jacks, and hydraulic equipment, compressors and air tools.  January 1974




Green St, west side near London Rd. A interesting and unusual design of tenement, with the stairwell open to the elements. Did it double as a drying area?  Zion Hall next to it.  July 1973

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London Rd, south side east of Binnie Place, opposite Green St. A former Congregational Church.  May 1974




Arcadia St, west side north of London Rd. Two model tenements of c1900, with part of the Greenhead Engine Works (c1860) on the right. All demolished around 1990.  July 1973

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London Rd, south side east of Blackfaulds Place.  The next street along is Silvergrove St - this will help to locate Blackfaulds Place, which has disappeared entirely. It led to the Greenhead Brewery, which by this time was only a bottling plant for Dunn and Moore.  May 1974




Looking down Stevenson St from Abercromby St.  Another interesting and impressive tenement block now demolished. Unusually, it had a stone balustrade and cast iron railing running the full length of the roof-line, guarding a rooftop drying area. The stone cartouche bears the city arms surrounded by the words ’Glasgow City Educational Endowments Board’.   February 1976

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Abercromby St at Stevenson St. On the far left is the Treble 2 Bar, which survives.  February 1976




Abercromby St, east side between the Gallowgate and St Mary’s Church. Glimpsed on the right is St Mary’s Primary School and on the left  St Mary’s Industrial School. All buildings long gone.  February 1974

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Gallowgate, south side at Abercromby St.  May 1974




Gallowgate, north side at Bellgrove St, with the Bellgrove Bar on the near corner.  January 1974




Gallowgate, south side at Tureen St.  May 1974

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Gallowgate, south side east of Claythorn St. The 1771 house with the nepus gable has been nicely restored but has lost its neighbours. Nepus gables were a common enough device in 17th and 18th century Scottish vernacular architecture, even in Glasgow, but I can’t think of another surviving example in the city.  May 1974




Gallowgate, south side west of Claythorn St. Of an only slightly later date, c1780, this has also been well restored, and these two houses show what can be done but all too seldom is.  May 1974

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Bain St, west side at the Gallowgate.  November 1973




Bain St. W.White & Son’s clay pipe factory, built in 1877 and by 1890 producing 14,000 pipes per day.
White and other smaller manufacturers in Glasgow supplied clay pipes to the world - according to John Hume they are commonly excavated in North American pioneer settlements and can be used for dating them. The twin buildings were formerly linked by an equally ornate 2-storey structure which housed the kilns, and the shadow of its gable can be seen.  December !975

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Kent St from the Gallowgate, before the iron arch and while the buildings were still full height.  October 1973




At the Barras.  September1973

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East Campbell St.  Built in 1864 as East Campbell St U P Church this has since 1932 served as the Church of  Scotland Lodging  House Mission. A rarity in the Calton, an almost unchanged street scene, though the tenement in the Gallowgate is gone.  November 1973




Corner of Little Dovehill and Gallowgate. Renovated.  December 1975

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Gallowgate, south side, from Little Dovehill. All these buildings are still there, but in badly mutilated form, reduced to one or two storeys. This is the cheapest and shabbiest course of action, and one much employed around here. I don’t think ‘Gay Fashions’ meant what it would mean today.  May 1974




Corner of Spoutmouth and Gallowgate. The White Tower Restaurant and the Loch Erne Bar occupied this ornate little building.  October 1973

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Same view, a couple of years later. Since the tenement block was about to come down I thought it was worth another shot or two.  March 1976




The doomed tenement from Charlotte St. Through the pend I could see a bonfire going, so I went round for a look.

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Some gentlemen of leisure were holding court.




Suspicious at first, they soon became friendly and insisted that I take their photo.




Little Dovehill in the background, with part of the Dovehill School.

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Corner of Bell St and Spoutmouth.  May 1974




Bell St, between Great and Little Dovehill. Dovehill School.  June 1975

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Duke St, north side at Burrell’s Lane. From the fortified boozer (Carr’s Bar) westward is still as was.  April 1973




Duke St at Parkhouse Lane.  June 1975

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John Knox St, east side above Duke St.  April 1973




Lower part of John Knox St from the Necropolis.  March 1973

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John Knox St, west side above Wishart St.  April 1973



Glenfield St, from where Warnock St had been.  This little enclave, a square (or parallelogram) formed by Alexandra Parade (N), James Orr St (E), Warnock St (S), and Glenfield St (W), was in process of being obliterated. The extension to the Royal Infirmary now occupies the site.   March 1973

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Firpark Terrace, overlooking Ark Lane. Still there, with more trees.  January 1974




Dunchattan St from Broompark Dr.  January 1974

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Looking up Edmund St from Dunchattan St to Cardross St. (This is a best guess as my note here is deficient. Feel free to correct me, Dennistonians.)   January 1974




Westercraigs, Blackfriars Parish Church (Campbell Douglas, 1878). It lost a spire from the south tower in the 1960s (compare with VM photo), and more recently the contemporary manse.  January 1974

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Craigpark, east side.   September 1978




Craigpark, Regent Place U F Church. Built in 1878 - congregation left in 1960 - building used as an assembly hall for Whitehill School - school closed in 1977 - empty church burnt down in 1983. A sad story for such a handsome church. Two brick villas now occupy the site.  January 1976.

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Bellfield St railway bridge.  January 1976




Wellpark St, north side. The fine Italianate building, which survives along with its associated Trinity Duke St Church, was built in 1867 as the Wellpark Institute, a Free Church school (possibly financed by the nearby Wellpark Brewery), later became Wellpark School, and is now Wellpark Enterprise Centre.  June 1975

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Sydney St, west side south of Duke St.  January 1974




Sydney St, west side looking down to the Gallowgate and on to Lambert St, with the Old Canteen Bar on the corner and , the dark building dimly seen beside the pub, the former Gallowgate Central Station, which closed in 1917.  January 1974

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Gallowgate, south side, looking east from Sydney St.  May 1974




Orr St, west side at Crownpoint Rd. The pub was The Crofters. Part of the former St Mary’s Calton Primary School (where Glasgow Metropolitan College now teaches furniture craft) can be seen. The Graham building was the former West St Weaving Mill (the former name for that part of Kerr St was West St).  January 1974

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On the Kerr St railway bridge.  February 1976




Corner of Crownpoint Rd and Brook St. Christ Church (Episcopal). January 1976

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Corner of Orr St and Broad St.  January 1974





Gallowgate, south side between Wesleyan St and Orr St. The unassuming entry to St Thomas’ Methodist Church, which was better viewed from Wesleyan St. In Neil and Machin’s window can be seen in reverse the letters ORIE - at my back was the Orient Cinema, at the corner of Sword St. A bingo hall from 1965 to 1995 it was only lost to fire in 2004.  February 1976




Wesleyan St, west side. St Thomas’ (thought to be an early work of John Baird I, c1825) was built as a chapel of ease for St John’s Burgh Church, but with the Disruption of  1843 leading to greatly reduced congregations for the established church this building became redundant and was sold to the Wesleyan Methodists, from whom the street took its name. It was popularly known as the Potters’ Kirk, from the number of the congregation employed in that trade - the large Annfield Pottery was just across the Gallowgate, indeed the Orient Cinema was built on the site of it. The bell-tower originally carried a small spire, which would have much improved the presence of the building. St Thomas’ closed its doors in 1973.  February 1976

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Interior of St Thomas’. I didn’t (too chicken) make a habit of entering derelict buildings, in fact I probably just poked the camera through a window here.




Wesleyan St, west side, a curiously country-town scene not 100 yards from the Gallowgate. This was built in 1859 as a wire works for W. Riddell & co.  February 1976

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Gallowgate, north side opposite Fielden St. Southwest corner of The Forge complex now.  March 1976




Gallowgate, north side somewhere in Camlachie. Can anyone say just where? Biggest clue is a kids’ swing-park to the right of the tenement (long established, judging by the ornate ironwork on the crossbar  of a set of swings). Premises are the Lunda Insulating Sheet Metal Co. (041-554-7231) and a Laundrette & Dry Cleaners.  March 1976

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Yate St, west side between Camlachie St and Gallowgate. I was surprised to find (thanks, VM) that this curious little building was Camlachie Police Station. It was built in 1877 to the design of John Carrick, who was Superintendent of Streets 1844-54, Master of Works 1854-62, and finally the very first City Architect 1862-89, and in these positions, particularly the last, had  a massive influence over the appearance of Victorian Glasgow. He decreed the regular grid layout of the city centre, and the City Improvement Trust which comprehensively redeveloped the area around the Cross was largely his project. Most of the minor public buildings of the period , halls, markets, baths, police stations, fire stations etc. were the work of Carrick and his department. Camlachie nick, with its Venetian campanile, was one of his more eccentric designs.

The buildings one the left were part of Camlachie Distillery, set up in 1834 as the Loch Katrine Distillery. No distilling had been carried out there since the 1920s, but it was still being used as a whisky bond by the Distillers Co. Note the proto-hoody, decades ahead of his time.  March 1976




Camlachie St. Curiouser and curiouser - a classical portico stuck on to the back of a police station. Whatever for? Were there a few spare columns lying around in a council yard? The building partly seen across Yate St (sorry I don’t have a proper shot of it) was Camlachie Institute, and in the distance is the retaining wall of the railway line (and part of the bridge carrying it over the Gallowgate) which connected Rutherglen with Springburn via Alexandra Park and Barnhill.  March 1976

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Ummm. Anyone got any idea? I’ve no note for it, but it must have been somewhere between Yate St and the Eastern Necropolis entrance. I thought it might be the cemetery gatehouse,  but it’s definitely not the same building, nor do the pillars or railings match. Over to UG’s collective knowledge.  March 1976




Gallowgate, north side, looking east from the Eastern Necropolis entrance. The pubs on either corner of Invernairn St were The Crossbar and The Reekie Linn. Forge cinema hereabouts now.  March 1976

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Barr’s Gallowgate factory with demolition under way. The linked tenement has been spared, and the Old Black Bull is still in business.  March 1976



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I spent a few hours around Parkhead Cross in March 1976. Before too much damage had been done it was deservedly made a Conservation Area, for there are some spectacular buildings, so with a few exceptions the next dozen or so shots have no great interest, as they could still be taken today, and better.

Parkhead Cross.




Corner of Duke St and Westmuir St.

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Corner of Burgher St and Tollcross Rd. Parkhead Savings Bank (1908, by John Keppie who at that time was in uneasy partnership with C R Mackintosh).




Burgher St, west side.

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Westmuir St, Parkhead Congregational Church (R. Baldie, 1879), still going strong.




Westmuir St, Parkhead School (H. McClure, 1879), no longer a school but still used by the Education Dept.

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Westmuir St, north side, east of Parkhead School.






Springfield Rd at the Gallowgate.

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886 Springfield Rd. I had thought this little cottage, so incongruous among the tenement blocks, was worth recording, so I was pleased to find that it features in SCRAN:

"This was probably the last single-storeyed hand-loom weaver's cottage in the east end of Glasgow. Built in the late 18th or early 19th century, it probably owed its survival to its conversion into a shop. It probably originally contained two dwellings. It was of rubble construction, with a pantile roof, and apart from the insertion of shop windows, was little altered externally. The east end of Glasgow had a large population of hand-loom weavers until the 1820s and 1830s when power-loom factories supplanted them. Most of their houses appear to have been two-storeyed. Pantiles made from local clay were common in the area."

I think the newsagent’s shop was still open in 1976, though in a diminished state compared with the 1967 John Hume photo, but sadly the cottage and the adjoining block have since been cleared and replaced with new housing (which I must say seems a very decent modern interpretation of the traditional Glasgow tenement).




The rear of the weaver’s cottage, with Newlands School across the road.  Nepus gables are normally placed centrally, and the asymmetrical position of this one, coupled with the lack of symmetry in the front roofline, suggest that the cottage would originally have been almost twice as long,. ‘Single-storeyed’ isn’t quite accurate, as it obviously had one-and-a-half storeys. The tileless condition of the rear roof and the general dilapidation imply that this charming little cottage did not have a great future.



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London Rd, north side east of Bridgeton Cross.  February 1974




Corner of Dalmarnock Rd and Main St, Bridgeton Cross Mansions.  January 1977

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Landressy St from the London Rd end.  January 1974




Landressy St, Barrowfield U F Church (Edgar Memorial).  January 1974




Landressy St at James St. Methodist Central Hall (1926).  January 1974

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Bridgeton (Greenhead) U F Church in Tullis St (demolished c1937) was one of the few in the area to have its own burial ground.  February 1974



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Alas, I can offer no information about the next two shots, other than that they were taken on 12/2/74, probably somewhere (from the sequence on the film) between Tullis St and Bridgeton Cross. In the angle of Tullis St and Main St seems as likely as anywhere. I’m not even sure whether they are of one back-land building or of two very similar ones. In the first shot there appears to be a connection with the first-floor landing of the tenement by an elevated passageway, which I think ought to be visible in the second but isn’t. Not for habitation surely, despite the chimneys - communal wash-house/s?





1892 map of the area. Might be in there somewhere.

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Generally careful when I started out on the project (March 1973), I was getting sloppy by this time (1976), disheartened by the seeming pointlessness of it all. The Internet was undreamt of in those days. Exhibition or publication would have been the only means of displaying  the photos to an audience, and who would ever want to publish or exhibit that lot? Anyway, as a result I can’t say for sure what the next two photos show, but the east side of Bridgeton Main St seems likely. The White Hart? An off-licence between a Galbraith’s and  MacMillan Bros. fireplaces? Ring a bell with any Old Brigtonians?  January 1976



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Floundering again. The flatiron shape of the tenement suggests the corner of Dalmarnock Rd and Old Dalmarnock Rd. The pub on the left, on the corner of, if I’m correct, Queen Mary St, is the Station Bar. ’1690’ is daubed on the tenement wall across from it, which narrows it down to somewhere in west-central Scotland.   January 1976




Dalmarnock Rd? H. A. Crombie licensed grocer at no.93.  January 1974

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Dalmarnock Rd, east side at Ruby St, Congregational Church in the distance.  January 1974




Dalmarnock Rd, Bridgeton Congregational Church, one of the very few old buildings left now in Dalmarnock Rd. The Zion Hall Pentecostal Church relocated here from Green St in the Calton.  January 1976

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Dalmarnock Rd.  January 1974




Dalmarnock Rd at the railway bridge.  January 1976




Dalmarnock Power Station. And the dug.  January 1976


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