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Alex Glass

Glasgow's Listed Buildings

Before I left the council one of the last matters that came before the Planning Committee was the first draft of a book that was to be issued covering Glasgow Post War Listed Buildings.

[The book is the result of a partnership with Glasgow City Council and Historic Scotland and is the second publication of its type celebrating post-war architecture in Scotland which is recognised through listing. The first book looked at Edinburgh's Post-war Listed Buildings and was published in 2011.

As of 9 May 2012 there are 237 post-war listed buildings in Scotland. Broken down by category there are 45 Cat A, 144 Cat B and 48 Cat C(S).

Listing is intended to recognise the special interest of Scotland's built heritage and to prevent unthinking change. Any building or man-made structure can be considered for listing. Buildings erected after 1945 may merit listing if their special interest is of definite architectural quality. The listing of buildings less than 30 years old requires exceptional rigour because there is not a long historical perspective and they will normally only be considered if they face immediate threat.] Taken from Glasgow City Council website.

An electronic copy of the book can be downloaded HERE

I hope that this thread can be used to post photos and descriptions of as many of the Listed Buildings in Glasgow.

Over the next couple of weeks I will try and get all the information I collected and post it here.

Please feel free to post your photos of any of your favourite listed buildings in Glasgow.
3rd-of-6

Excellent topic Alex.  There is a key phrase in the Councils release flagging that any man-made structure can be considered for listing not just buildings.
Alex Glass

39-69 (ODD NOS) CANDLERIGGS AND 5-15 (ODD NOS) WILSON STREET

39-69 (ODD NOS) CANDLERIGGS AND 5-15 (ODD NOS) WILSON STREET (Ref:32644



This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 04/09/1989.



Description
Built circa 1790 by James and William Carswell of Kilmarnock, builders. Range of 4 and 5-storey warehouses with shops to ground, long elevation to Candleriggs of 30 bays arranged 7-8-5-10, 10-bay elevation to Wilson Street. All rendered over ashlar with symmetrically placed single light windows with sash and case plate-glass glazing. CANDLERIGGS ELEVATION: No 39-57 7-bay 4-storey block, Nos 59-69, 23-bay 5-storey block Round-arched pend at No 53 formerly giving access to Smith's Court (see separate item), otherwise most ground floor elevations altered with shopfronts. All windows single light sash and case with plate-glass glazing. In 1963 cement margins were applied to windows in an unsuccessful attempt to group them symmetrically and articulate the otherwise severely plain facade. Cornice over ground survives only at Nos 59-63, all with moulded eaves cornice. Corniced wallhead stacks survive to Nos 39-41, otherwise removed. Slate roofs, circular stair towers to rear elevations at 53-61. WILSON STREET ELEVATION: plain 10-bay 5-storey elevation detailed as above. Plain wallhead stacks, slate roofs.

Notes
B group with 110 Trongate and Candleriggs. Part of a complete range of 18th-century warehouses which occupied the whole length of Candleriggs with flanks to Trongate and Wilson Street, this range was broken when part was demolished to accommodate the Goldberg's Store entrance built in 1938. The southern range of the Candleriggs warehouses is listed separately. Even with its 20-century insertion the Candleriggs range remains one of the few near-complete 18th-century ranges in the Merchant City. 1989 proposal to convert to residential use and remove paint from elevation.

References
Gomme and Walker 1987, p.54, 309. Information by courtesy of the Buildings of Scotland Research Unit.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.
Alex Glass

60-106 (EVEN NOS) CANDLERIGGS 3-31 (ODD NOS) BELL STREET AND

60-106 (EVEN NOS) CANDLERIGGS 3-31 (ODD NOS) BELL STREET AND 69-97 (ODD NOS) ALBION STREET CANDLERIGGS CITY HALL AND BAZAAR (Ref:32647)





This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category A building and was listed on 15/12/1970.



Description
Complex of buildings occupying large rectangular site, buildings to N (completing the block) have been demolished.Bazaar (former cheese and fruit market) to the S begun 1817 as open air walled market-place; walls partially rebuilt (to SE) and roofed over 1907 by JAT Houston, architect.City Hall begun 1839-41 by George Murray, Albion Street elevation 1843 (after death of Murray), N end John Baird Snr. 1843-45 Halls reroofed and some interior work John Baird II, 1851-54. Candleriggs elevation of Halls remodelled by John Carrick 1885, and added curved range of single storey shops to Candleriggs/Bell Street corner. Arched market hall at N John Carrick with Bell and Miller 1852-53.CITY HALL90-98 Candleriggs: Main hall. John Carrick, 1885. Italianate facade with rich detailing. 2-storey, 5-bay polished sandstone front with lower courses of polished pink granite.Square-headed pilastered doorways to ground with heavy panelled doors. Flanking these, giant Corinthian pilasters divide bays, each engaged to banded piers which rise through ground and 1st floors to springing point of 1st floor windows. 1st floor windows round-arched with deep reveals, blind balustrading below. All windows with 3 large vertical glazing bars to lower part, and upper part with 5-pane glazing.Channelled masonry at spandrel level. Pilasters support entablature with dentil band and mutule cornice. Die balustrade to parapet.Interior: Albion Street elevation: simple astylar 3 and 4-storey 18-bay elevation to Albion Street truncated to N, arranged 10-5-3, 10 bays to S 3-storey and plainer in detail. Central 5-bays shallow advanced and taller with channelled ground floor masonry. Pilastered doorways to ground to outer bays, some with original double-leaf panelled doors.To S 10 bays all windows plain single lights, to Northernmost bays 1st and 2nd windows architraved, corniced to 1st. To centre 5 bays inner 3 bays recessed and grouped as tripartite window with pilasters dividing lights at 1st, to 2nd consoled frieze. Flanking these, ramped architraved windows, with consoled cornice to 1st. All windows single light with either modern 3-pane glazing or sash and case windows with 12-pane glazing.To N and centre bays continuous cornice over ground string course to 2nd at N. Each section separate main cornice, disc frieze over centre, cornice rising to stepped parapet over centre bays.Market Hall: Pend to No 71 gives access to aisled and galleried market hall (Carrick with Bell and Miller) with elaborate and very decorative cast-iron trussed roofs. Elaborate cast-iron balconies, pierced spandrel details.BAZAAR60-82 Candleriggs and 3-9 Bell Street: John Carrick, 1885. Long elevation of 2-storeys 25 bays with shops to ground and saloon above curving at corner of Candleriggs and Bell Street. Painted polished ashlar. Taller pedimented pend entrance with channelled masonry to N. Otherwise plain masonry, shopfronts to ground. 1st floor windows round-arched with pilastered reveals, 6-pane glazing. Pilasters flank bays, plain entablature. Eaves cornice and blocking course. To curved angle, wider bay (formerly pend to ground) with paired Doric anta piers and columns flanking window. Above scrolled pediment dated 1885 with fruit basket finial. Slate roofs.13-31 Bell Street and 69-97 Albion Street: 1907, J W Houston, architect. Italianate single storey facade to S fronting Bell Street and flank Albion Street, cast-iron framed interior.Bell Street: main elevation symmetrical 7-bay in polished red sandstone. Fluted giant engaged Ionic columns (pilasters to end and centre bays) divide bays each with large recessed opening below housing vehicle entrances to end and centre bays, shopfronts and pedestrian access to intermediate bays. Above, large moulded semi-circular arch with disc moulding to each. To central bay shallow segmental arch with foliate mouldings and cartouche. Columns support entablature and at centre bay segmental pediment.Albion Street: long plainer elevation to Albion Street, 6-bay with channelled masonry. To Northernmost bay large roll-moulded vehicle entrance and pend, cornice over. Otherwise each bay has bipartite timber shopfront (all recently restored) under common cornice. Plain eaves band with cornice.Interior: good cast-iron framed interior with plain cast-iron columns supporting roof trusses in 3-aisled layout. Slate and glass roof.

Notes

References
Information by courtesy of the Buildings of Scotland Research Unit. Gomme and Walker 1987, p.305.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland











norrie

Hi Alex, just found this thread, good idea, I have wondered when taking photos how many of the buildings were listed, the list will tell me
Alex Glass

133-155 (ODD NOS) STOCKWELL STREET, 128-138 (EVEN NOS) BRIDG

133-155 (ODD NOS) STOCKWELL STREET, 128-138 (EVEN NOS) BRIDGEGATE AND 1-3 (ODD NOS) AIRD'S LANE (Ref:32767)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 15/01/1985



A B McDonald, Office of Public Works, 1905. Monumental scheme of tenement accommodation, office and shops on corner site. All in similar Edwardian Glasgow style, Nos 133-155 Stockwell Street in more elaborate French Baroque style.All 4 storeys and attic, polished red ashlar, slate roofs.Nos 133-135 Stockwell Street: symmetrical 5-bay block, banded ashlar to 1st with shops to ground.Outer bays with consoled canted oriels (aedicular at 2nd) rise to eaves, taller tower features with basket arched attic windows rise to pyramidal pavilion roofs with lead dome. Centre 3 bays have consoled balcony over 1st supporting giant Ionic columns dividing bays to 2nd and 3rd. Consoled balconies to 3rd. Heavy mutule cornice over, deep plain parapet with urn finials. Over outer bays elaborate parapet with die pedestals and balustrade. Glazing has 3-pane upper part, plate glass single pane lower part. 3rd floor windows with small pane glazing.141-155 (Stockwell Street and return elevation to Bridgegate: Dated 1905. 9-bay elevation to Stockwell Street, bowed corner bay, 3-bay elevation to Bridgegate. Shops to ground, 1st floor windows with mutule cornices, some 2nd floor windows aedicular, 3rd floor windows with projecting cills.Corner bay bowed 3-light oriel corbelled over ground. Aedicular window to 2nd, cartouches over 3rd, ogival lead dome. Tall stacks rise from corbels at 2nd and flank dome.Stockwell Street and return elevation to Bridgegate end and central 2 bays gabled and with aedicular gable-head windows. To centre aedicule cartouche with date 1905. Balustraded parapet, mansard roof with single light dormers. Bridgegate return elevation 5-bay, similarly detailed.128-134 Bridgegate: 5-bay 4-storey block linked to 136-8 Bridgegate by single storey shop at No 134. Similarly detailed to above and part of the same scheme. Outer bays with canted oriels rising from 1st to deep parapets. Centre 3 bays with bipartite windows flanking narrower single light window.Bolection moulded eaves cornice, slate roofs.All with brick elevations to rear in Aird's Lane.

Notes

References
Glasgow City Archives DOG Ref 2/610. Additional information by courtesy of Iain Paterson, Glasgow City Council.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.

















Alex Glass

72 CLYDE STREET AND 135 BRIDGEGATE, OLD FISH MARKET KNOWN AS

72 CLYDE STREET AND 135 BRIDGEGATE, OLD FISH MARKET KNOWN AS THE BRIGGAIT (Ref:32664)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category A building and was listed on 15/10/1970



Clarke and Bell, 1873. Former fish market on the site of the Merchants Guild Hall (now demolished) and enclosing the 17th-century Merchants steeple to NE (see separate item). The site is an irregular triangle and consists of the Main Hall which has an elaborate cast-iron interior and the E halls of plainer construction and circa 1889 date by John Carrick, architect. The whole fish market was internally redesigned 1987-8 around the original structural features as a shopping centre. CLYDE STREET (S) ELEVATION: Main 8-bay show facade to Fish Market main hall, and to extreme right 3-bay facade of E halls.8-bay Main Halls: polished ashlar, rusticated at ground. 8-bay front with round arched openings, to 3rd and 7th bays (from left) full height pilastered vehicle entrances flanked by paired engaged giant de l'Orme columns supporting projecting entablature, elaborate cast iron outer gates and tympani. Otherwise rusticated arches to shopfronts. Cornice over ground floor, swagged occuli at 1st with decorative cast iron ventilating grilles. Decorated Doric frieze with cornice over, deep plain parapet, balustrading to centre 3 bays, over porticos plinths support winged sea horses flanking central medallion of Queen Victoria. 3-bay E section, now detached facade to E Hall, plainer than Main hall facade with 3 round arched vehicle entrances. BRIDGEGATE (N) ELEVATION: long pedimented Renaissance facade to N, painted ashlar rusticated to ground, channelled to 1st. Arcaded ground floor with main 7-bay section (facade to Main Hall) to right, full height vehicle entrances to penultimate bays flank shop fronts. Pilastered rectangular windows to 1st and 3 centre bays flanked by Glasgow City Arms and single windows.Frieze and cornice with pediment over 7-bay section with 3-light window to tympanum, akroteria and central topical urn with fish finial at apex. To E, 6-bay plainer lower section (facade to E halls) has similar baying pattern with entrance archways flanked by shop fronts. To 1st, plain rectangular windows, at angle with Merchant Lane turret oriel. MERCHANTS LANE (E) ELEVATION: brick walling. Single windows to 2 storeys at N end, attic windows light market halls. INTERIOR: Main Hall: irregular rectangle, galleried on all sides, modern stairs give access to balconies. Galleries are supported on cast iron Doric columns, the roof on plain columns. Roof structure arched iron braces with decorative traceried spandrels supporting glazed and slated roof. Walling originally faced in white glazed bricks, now only surviving to N window surrounds.E and Central Halls, lower subsidiary halls. Similar cast iron Doric columns support partly glazed slated roof.

Notes

References
SR Archives; D of G 1/938 dated 1889. John Carrick architect for the E addition to the Fish Market. Information by courtesy of The Buildings of Scotland Research Unit.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.




























Alex Glass

72 CLYDE STREET, BRIDGEGATE, MERCHANTS STEEPLE, NOW ENCLOSED

72 CLYDE STREET, BRIDGEGATE, MERCHANTS STEEPLE, NOW ENCLOSED WITHIN THE BRIGGAIT (Ref:32665)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category A building and was listed on 06/07/1966



Completed 1665. The tall tower of the Merchants Steeple is all that remains of the Merchants Guild Hall and Hospital, built 1659 and demolished in 1817. The tower, which formerly adjoined the S wall of the tall 2-storey Merchant's House was later incorporated into the 1873 Fish Market (see separate item). Tall, slim, ashlar tower, square section with 7-storeys, basement and spire, diminishing stages at top 2 storeys and spire. EXTERIOR: fine ashlar walling. Lower 3 floors obscured by later building, clock face to 4th with pierced ashlar heart motif balustraded balcony to 5th. Tower stepped in at this and subsequent floors, all with similar balconies. Paired louvred lancets to 5th floor, traceried window to 6th floor with corbelled detail. Above this rises spire with 2 levels of lucarnes, bulbous onion finial and weathervane. INTERIOR: at present access to the tower is by an opening in the S wall, plainly originally only a window by its incomplete dressings and narrow dimensions. The basement has a wide blocked arched opening, presumably once giving access to undercroft of Merchant's House. A wide newel staircase occupying whole floor space rises through 2 floors. To the N wall at ground a handsome and elaborately roll-moulded door, and to 1st a large arched doorway with steps both now blocked but once giving access to Merchant's House. At 1st floor a complete row of corbels to E wall; corresponding row to W interrupted by the rise of the newel stair. This awkward arrangement and the different tooling and character of the stone stairs at this point would indicate some changes to floor plan at this level. At 2nd floor a timber step ladder rises to give access to intramural spiral stair in NE angle rising from 3rd to 4th floor. In addition a series of timber stairs rise around open well to top of the tower. Most probably just such a timber stair was part of the original arrangement, a series of corbels placed across angles may have given support for a stair (or internal scaffolding). Above 1st floor level there are windows to each face, at 4th floor there are large clock faces. Apart from the one roll moulded door most openings have plain internal dressings, one piece of chamfering and a worked corbel are found at basement level. There are no surviving internal fittings, a large panelled ?18th century door has at some time been fitted to close off the stair at 1st floor.

Notes
See 64-76 (Even Nos) Clyde Street.

References
Gomme and Walker, 1987, p.44, 307. NMRS, elevations and some plans Peter MacGregor Chalmers.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.




glaswegian

wow some of the pictures are really good here!
Alex Glass

Thanks Glaswegian hopefully I will be able to keep up the quality for you. I hope to get out and about soon to get more photos of the listed buildings near me.
Alex Glass

106-110 (EVEN NOS) TRONGATE AND 3-9 (ODD NOS) CANDLERIGGS (R

106-110 (EVEN NOS) TRONGATE AND 3-9 (ODD NOS) CANDLERIGGS (Ref:32785)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 04/09/1989



Built circa 1790 by James and William Carswell of Kilmarnock, builders. Range of 4-storey warehouses all in simple late 18th century style with some interiors altered. 6-bay elevation toTrongatewith wide 5-bay gabled flank and further 4 bay elevation to Candleriggs. These buildings are part of a range formerly occupying the whole length of Candleriggs, but are interrupted now by a 1960s insertion (unlisted) approximately halfway along the range. The N part of the 18th century range is listed as a separate item: Nos 55-69 Candleriggs and Nos 5-15 Wilson Street. All are rendered over ashlar, with symmetrically placed single light windows with sash and case plate-glass glazing. Ground floors have mostly altered shop fronts. TRONGATE ELEVATION: 5-bay with altered shop fronts to ground, architraved windows to 1st and 2nd, painted margins to 3rd. Cornice over ground, cill course to 2nd. Parapet at eaves (eaves cornice gone), slate roofs. Gable over 5-bay flank to Candleriggs, alternate 1st floor windows have cornices. Schematic Venetian window to gablehead, skews, axial stacks. CANDLERIGGS ELEVATION: 9 bay elevation, arranged 5-4 with S 5-bay section being gable to 110Trongate (see above). Otherwise windows are simple, they have been given (circa 1963) concrete architraves with group windows in 3s and 4s in an unsuccessful attempt to articulate a baying pattern.

Notes
B group with 55-69 Candleriggs and 5-15 Wilson Street. First synagogue in Glasgow occupied an upper floor (big timber column in situ). Nos 11-19 (listed previously) have been recently demolished (2004).

References
Gomme and Walker 1987, p54. Information by courtesy of the Buildings of Scotland Research Unit.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.






Building at Risk


General Details and Location


Category

AT RISK


Name of Building



Other Name(s)



Address

106-110, Trongate, Merchant City


Locality

Glasgow


Postcode (click to find nearby buildings)

G1 5EN


Planning Authority (click to search)

Glasgow


Divisional Area (click to search)



Reference No

1639


Listing Category

B


OS Grid Ref

NS 59487 64965


Location Type

Urban


HS Reference No

32785


Description


Range of 4 storey warehouses, all in a simple late 18th century style and now partly incorporated into the 1936-1938 Goldbergs department store. The building is in rendered ashlar with single light windows. Modern shopfronts have been inserted at ground floor level. The Trongate elevation extends to 6 bays and features architraved first and second floor windows and a cornice over the ground floor. A wide 5 bay gable looks onto Candleriggs. Alternate first floor windows are corniced. A further block extends along Candleriggs. It once extended the whole length of the street, but has now been greatly demolished. The block was once mirrored by an almost identical block on the east side of the street, but this has now been demolished. First synagogue in Glasgow occupied an upper floor (big timber column in situ). (Historic Scotland) James Carswell and his brother William came to Glasgow from Kilmarnock in 1790 and started building in Candleriggs. An article in the Glasgow Herald asserted " almost the whole of Candleriggs owes its existence to them, including Commercial Court with its surrounding warehouses; this was the model upon which so many courts have been built by which business is conducted apart from the public street." The Carswells also built part of Cochrane Street and Ingram Court. ( Gomme & Walker)


Building Dates

circa 1790


Architects

James Carswell and William Carswell


Category of Risk and Development History


Condition

Poor


Category of Risk

High


Exemptions to State of Risk



Field Visits

September 2000
June 2004
September 2007, 01/09/2007, 16/09/2009, 11/11/2010, 01/06/2004, 01/09/2000


Development History


August 1996: Consents are granted for the redevelopment of the site including restoration, part demolition and façade retention to provide 49 flats, shops, rooftop restaurant, business centre and offices. The plans are subsequently abandoned. September 2000: Local planners report that the building has stood empty for over 10 years. External inspection reveals that the render on the Candleriggs elevation is starting to peel and vegetation is growing from the wallhead. The Trongate elevation is tied and the parapet cracked. The downpipes appear faulty, leading to water leaks. Iron oxide has started to streak the Candleriggs elevation. Permissions are granted for mixed use development, including residential, hotel, commercial, retail and leisure uses. December 2000: Permissions are sought for mixed use development between 5-67 Candleriggs, 10 Hutcheson Street, 106-172 Trongate, 7 Wilson Street and 5-7 and 16-44 Brunswick Street. The proposals include selective demolition, refurbishment and new build for residential and commercial uses. SCT welcomes the application as constituting a significant focus to the Merchant City Townscape Heritage Initiative, though it expresses concern at some design elements and the proposed loss of some ancient thoroughfares. May 2002: SCT receives reports that some emergency works have been carried out following a collapse onto Candleriggs. The property has now been purchased by Selfridges. Discussions are continuing with regards to a proposed department store on the site of 4 listed buildings. June 2004: External inspection reveals the building to remain at risk. Part of the Candleriggs elevation has now been demolished. September 2007: External inspection reveals that the building is now supported by four sets of girders. All the windows have been covered in plastic sheeting. The render is cracked in many places and there is spalling at roof level.


January 2009: The Evening Times reports that Selfridges have no immediate plans to build the proposed mixed use development that was planned for the site.


July 2009: The Evening Times and The Metro report on plans to clear the site and convert it to a public park and a car park while Selfridges consider the full and permanent redevelopment of the site. This may involve demolition of derelict buildings on the site. A planning application for temporary land use is expected to be lodged soon. A public consultation event is being held at the City Halls on July 15th from 4pm-8pm.


September 2009: External inspection finds that the building has changed little since the previous visit, although it is heartening to note that although the ground floor retail units are vacant they have been repainted.


June 2010: Selfridges lodge an application to demolish Smith‘s Court to create a 24 hour car-park, as a short to medium term use until a longer term solution for the site is proposed. Should the scheme be approved the developers envisage temporary markets, landscaping and an outdoor cafe area for the space. The Glasgow Evening Times reports on a number of objections being lodged against the scheme, including the Merchant City Townscape Initiative and the Merchant City Community Council. SCT lodges an objection, acknowledging the poor condition of Smith‘s Court, querying whether the quality of design and level of aspiration of the application is sufficent for the Glasgow Central conservation area, and noting the application does not address the derelict condition of the remaining buildings on the Selfridges development site.


November 2010: External inspection finds the building remains derelict and continues to deteriorate. The supporting girders are rusting. There are missing slates from the roof. The east elevation is becoming increasingly discoloured suggesting damp problems. The paint on the parapet is cracking and flaking.


Guides to Development


Conservation Area

Glasgow Central


Planning Authority Contact

Shona Simpson


PAC Telephone Number

0141 287 5492


Availability


Current Availability

Not Available


Appointed Agents



Price

N/A


Occupancy

Vacant


Occupancy Type

N/A


Present/Former Uses

Shop to Offices, Warehouse/Store to Shop


Name of Owners

Selfridges


Type of Ownership

Company


Information Services


Additional Contacts/Information Source



Bibliography

Architecture of Glasgow (1987) A Gomme & D Walker p 54


Online Resources

Virtual Mitchell: http://www.mitchelllibrary.org/vi...p?i=13324&r=2&t=4&x=1


Classification

Shops


Original Entry Date

12/09/2000


Date of Last Edit

16/11/2010
Hawick_1987

Good work Alex, keep it up  
Alex Glass

1 SALTMARKET, GLASGOW CROSS THE MERCAT CROSS (Ref:33856)

1 SALTMARKET, GLASGOW CROSS THE MERCAT CROSS (Ref:33856)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 16/03/1993



Edith Burnet Hughes, 1930. Mercat cross, design a variant of crosses such as Edinburgh or Prestonpans. Octagonal balustraded base with tall shaft supporting Unicorn, stone-built monument in 17th century Scots style. Rock-faced base containing small chamber, roll-moulded doorway to E, small roll-moulded windows. Polished ashlar basecourse and dressings, small-paned windows, dummy gunholes. Heavily corbelled and machicolated parapet with balustrade. Slim octagonal stone shaft surmounted by unicron sedant with shield.

Notes

References

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland












cybers

Wonder what thats like inside  
Alex Glass

9, 11, 13 WATSON STREET, 31 GALLOWGATE (Ref:33861)

9, 11, 13 WATSON STREET, 31 GALLOWGATE (Ref:33861)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 16/03/1993



Style of James Hamilton. Built circa 1880. 3-storey and attic corner tenement with public houses at ground, stone-cleaned ashlar above. Italianate, arcaded windows with pilastered jambs/mullions, round-arched at 1st floor, stilted segmental arches above; main cornice, attic windows above at curved corner and regularly placed facing Watson Street; short elevation to Gallowgate. Distinctive glazing pattern with casements.

Notes

References

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland







Alex Glass

cybers wrote:
Wonder what thats like inside  


I am sure I could arrange for the door to be opened here and across the road for you but it would need to be a day during the week.  
Alex Glass

HIGH STREET GLASGOW CROSS THE TOLBOOTH STEEPLE (Ref:32717)

HIGH STREET GLASGOW CROSS THE TOLBOOTH STEEPLE (Ref:32717)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category A building and was listed on 06/07/1966



Tall early 17th century tower, only surviving fragment of Glasgow's Tolbooth, built 1626-1634 by John Boyd, architect and Master of Works. The Tolbooth was demolished in 1921. Seven stage square tower with open crown spire, ashlar built with raised buckle-quoins. Moulded string courses between stages. The steeple fomerly adjoined the Tolbooth at the W. Roll-moulded and architraved doors to ground are 20th century work. To each face, except that to W, to upper stages, roll-moulded windows with decorative strapwork pediments. 7th stage with square clock faces. Corbelled parapet with projecting square section bartizans. From these rise flying buttresses supporting crown steeple with gilded weathervane.

Notes
MacKechnie's article suggests the use of the buckle quoin can be linked to a court style of the early 17th century and the work of James Murray and William Wallace. De-scheduled 25 August 1998.

References
Gomme and Walker, 1987, p44. PSAS 111: 1981 p451. MacKechnie, ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY, vol 31: 1988, p112. EXTRACTS FROM THE RECORDS OF THE BURGH OF GLASGOW 1573-1642. P346ff, published 1876 by the Scottish Burgh Record Society.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.

















calamity

Great info there, never realized we still had some buildings dating back to the 1700s in the town.
Alex Glass

Really -  the Cathedral,  Provands Lordship,  Babity  Browsers

more to come later.
cybers

St Andrews in the Square too as the Young pretender used it to stable his cuddies while he went for a jig at Bennetts.
calamity

no no ,was meaning the Candleriggs one you put on here, as didnt look that old.
Alex Glass

15-23 (ODD NOS) LONDON ROAD AND 26 GALLOWGATE, MERCAT BUILDI

15-23 (ODD NOS) LONDON ROAD AND 26 GALLOWGATE, MERCAT BUILDING (Ref:33851)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category A building and was listed on 15/12/1970



A Graham Henderson, built 1928-1933. Enormous gushet building, 6 floors, 4 storeys plus double attic. Steel-framed polished ashlar, black granite at ground with shops, contrasting stone-cleaned light-coloured stone above; small-paned metal-framed glazing. At gushet, a giant round-arched deep recess, Ionic-columned screen; some scultpured detail. (Alexander Proudfoot and Archibald Dawson, sculptors) Bays to flank are regular, deep window recesses, giant pilaster strips divide bays at 2nd/3rd floors (bronze panels between floors; main entablature above, full attic storey with metal balconies, slated mansard above.

Notes

References
Gomme and Walker, p315. Dean of Guild 1928/114, 9 March 1928, completed 2 June 1933. Additional information courtesy of Iain Paterson, City of Glasgow District Council.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland






















Alex Glass

3-39 (ODD NOS) TRONGATE 2 SALTMARKET 5-7 (ODD NOS) CHISHOLM

3-39 (ODD NOS) TRONGATE 2 SALTMARKET 5-7 (ODD NOS) CHISHOLM STREET (Ref:32768)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 04/09/1989



A B MacDonald, 1891-1900, probably implementing designs made circa 1877 by John Carrick for the City Improvements Trust, 1877 onwards. 4 storeys and attic, astylar terrace of tenements with French flavour to lively roofline and bowed corner bays. Polished ashlar, ground floor with modern shopfronts and 3 altered close entrances to Nos 5, 15 and 20, with timber architraves and decorative fanlights. 18-window front with mixed single, bipartite and tripartite windows, all with architraves, bracketted cornices to 1st and 2nd, corner bays are bowed with 3 single lights, French truncated conical roofs. All sash and case windows with plate glass glazing. Banded masonry to 1st floor, banded pilasters mark party walls, cornice over each floor, deep mutuled bracketted eaves cornice. Balustraded parapet with pedimented dormers, some in Venetian window pattern, central cartouche dated 1877. Mansard slate roofs, axial stacks. 2-bay return elevations to Chisholm Street and Saltmarket, both similarly detailed.

Notes

References
Gomme and Walker, 1987, p.321. Information by courtesy of Buildings of Scotland Research Unit. Dean of Guild Ref 1/1349, 19 January 1891. Additional information from Iain Paterson, Glasgow City Council.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.






















Alex Glass

140-144 (EVEN NOS) TRONGATE (Ref:32787)

140-144 (EVEN NOS) TRONGATE (Ref:32787)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 04/09/1989



Circa 1875. 4-storey cast-iron framed warehouse with ecclectic detailing. Symmetrical painted 3-bay facade with each bay having 3 windows. Iron colonnettes divide bays, giant order terminal partly fluted masonry pilasters with decorated capitals to 1st and 2nd. Outer bays at 3rd have paired pilasters. 3rd floor windows stilted segmental heads with circlets in spandrels. All windows with sash and case plate-glass glazing. Moulded bands over floors, eaves cornice. Good cast-iron balustrade to parapet with ashlar die piers, parapet and piers missing to left. Slate roofs.

Notes

References
Gomme and Walker 1987, p.322.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.
















Building at Risk


General Details and Location


Category

AT RISK


Name of Building



Other Name(s)



Address

140, Trongate, Merchant City


Locality

Glasgow


Postcode (click to find nearby buildings)

G1 5EN


Planning Authority (click to search)

Glasgow


Divisional Area (click to search)



Reference No

2724


Listing Category

B


OS Grid Ref

NS 59430 64974


Location Type

Urban


HS Reference No

32787


Description


Four storey cast-iron framed warehouse with ecclectic detailing. Symmetrical painted 3-bay facade with each bay having 3 windows. Iron colonnettes divide bays, giant order terminal partly fluted masonry pilasters with decorated capitals to 1st and 2nd. Outer bays at 3rd have paired pilasters. 3rd floor windows stilted segmental heads with circlets in spandrels. All windows with sash and case plate-glass glazing. Moulded bands over floors, eaves cornice. Good cast-iron balustrade to parapet with ashlar die piers, parapet and piers missing to left. Slate roofs. (Historic Scotland)


Building Dates

circa 1875


Architects

Unknown


Category of Risk and Development History


Condition

Poor


Category of Risk

Moderate


Exemptions to State of Risk



Field Visits

11/11/2010, 16/09/2009, June 2004
September 2007, 01/06/2004, 01/09/2007


Development History


June 2004: External inspection reveals the upper floors to be vacant and in deteriorating condition. There is much vegetation growth at the wallhead. September 2007: External inspection reveals the external paintwork is in poor condition as are the window frames. One window is boarded over. One pilaster has been meshed. There is extensive plant growth on the ledges.


April 2008: Local planners report this site is part of the planned Selfridges development – some remedial repairs are to be carried out here shortly. The Central Pier to the roof parapet is to be reinstated and the roof flashing is to be repaired.


January 2009: The Evening Times reports that Selfridges have no immediate plans to build the proposed mixed use development that was planned for the site.


July 2009: The Evening Times and The Metro report on plans to clear the site and convert it to a public park and a car park while Selfridges consider the full and permanent redevelopment of the site. This may involve demolition of derelict buildings on the site. A planning application for temporary land use is expected to be lodged soon. A public consultation event is being held at the City Halls on July 15th from 4pm-8pm.


September 2009: External inspection reveals little has changed since the previous SCT visit.


June 2010: Selfridges lodge an application to demolish Smith‘s Court to create a 24 hour car-park, as a short to medium term use until a longer term solution for the site is proposed. Should the scheme be approved the developers envisage temporary markets, landscaping and an outdoor cafe area for the space. The Glasgow Evening Times reports on a number of objections being lodged against the scheme, including the Merchant City Townscape Initiative and the Merchant City Community Council. SCT lodges an objection, acknowledging the poor condition of Smith‘s Court, querying whether the quality of design and level of aspiration of the application is sufficent for the Glasgow Central conservation area, and noting the application does not address the derelict condition of the remaining buildings on the Selfridges development site.


November 2010: External inspection finds the building wholely disused. The building continues to deteriorate, especially at upper levels where damp and lack of maintenance are taking their toll. The windows are in poor condition. However, positive action has been taken to remove bushes from the cornice.


Guides to Development


Conservation Area

Glasgow Central


Planning Authority Contact

Shona Simpson


PAC Telephone Number

0141 287 5492


Availability


Current Availability

Unknown


Appointed Agents



Price

Unknown


Occupancy

Vacant


Occupancy Type

Unknown


Present/Former Uses

Warehouse/Store to Shop


Name of Owners

Unverified - see FAQ section on ascertaining ownership


Type of Ownership

Unknown


Information Services


Additional Contacts/Information Source



Bibliography



Online Resources



Classification

Shops


Original Entry Date

01/06/2004


Date of Last Edit

01/03/2013
discominer

Great posts and pics Alex.
Alex Glass

Thanks discominer

I was out today in the lovely April sunshine taking more and hope to post them soon
DavidMcD316

excellent photos.

is that building with the dome on the roof next to stow college a listed building?
Alex Glass

Do you mean this one?


101, 103, NEW CITY ROAD (Ref:33090)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 10/06/1987

Neil C Duff, 1909. Edwardian Baroque. 4-storey gushet block with corner bank. Red ashlar, rusticated at ground floor with voussoirs, boldly detailed at corner section. Sash and case windows in architraves. Ground floor cornice. SE curved corner section: open and broken segmental pedimented semi-engaged doorpiece and sidelights with granite shafts and corner pilasters; sculpted tympanum; angle figure sculptures of cherubim; keyblocked, open pedimented, aediculed window above; circular 3-bay section rising from 1st to attic floor with 2-light window set in pilaster strips; blind balustrade 1st floor outer bays; bowed balconies at 3rd floor; mutule cornice; sculpted corbelled balustrade, attic with circular windows and turret roof; cast-iron finial. Main block: ground floor cill band; sculpted keyblocked arched windows (altered at NW angle); recessed, pedimented entrances at northern return; angle quoin strips with sculpted capitals. NORTHERN RETURN: 2nd, 3rd and 4th bays from E canted from 2nd floor, central bay canted from 1st with centre aedicule window breaking through solid 2nd floor bracketted balcony; open, broken pedimented aedicule lights in central bays of outer canted bays; corniced keyblocked outer lights, sculpted figure group over central bay in parapet. Extreme NW and 1st return bay from N set in pilaster strip surmounted by open, segmental pediments with sculpted tympana; keyblocked, aediculed windows with blind balusters at 1st floor; 3rd floor architraved, keyblocked window with pediment; bowed cast-iron balcony. WESTERN ELEVATION EXCLUDING NW CORNER: 3 bays, outer bays blank; continuous solid bracketted parapet at 1st floor; canted central bay with pedimented window at 1st floor. SOUTHERN ELEVATION TO SHAMROCK STREET: variation of baroque design with swagged sculpture. Corniced ridge, axial, and wallhead stacks.

Notes
Built for Glasgow Savings Bank.

References
S.R. Archives, D of G 2/2540.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland
DavidMcD316

Alex Glass wrote:
Do you mean this one?


101, 103, NEW CITY ROAD (Ref:33090)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 10/06/1987

Neil C Duff, 1909. Edwardian Baroque. 4-storey gushet block with corner bank. Red ashlar, rusticated at ground floor with voussoirs, boldly detailed at corner section. Sash and case windows in architraves. Ground floor cornice. SE curved corner section: open and broken segmental pedimented semi-engaged doorpiece and sidelights with granite shafts and corner pilasters; sculpted tympanum; angle figure sculptures of cherubim; keyblocked, open pedimented, aediculed window above; circular 3-bay section rising from 1st to attic floor with 2-light window set in pilaster strips; blind balustrade 1st floor outer bays; bowed balconies at 3rd floor; mutule cornice; sculpted corbelled balustrade, attic with circular windows and turret roof; cast-iron finial. Main block: ground floor cill band; sculpted keyblocked arched windows (altered at NW angle); recessed, pedimented entrances at northern return; angle quoin strips with sculpted capitals. NORTHERN RETURN: 2nd, 3rd and 4th bays from E canted from 2nd floor, central bay canted from 1st with centre aedicule window breaking through solid 2nd floor bracketted balcony; open, broken pedimented aedicule lights in central bays of outer canted bays; corniced keyblocked outer lights, sculpted figure group over central bay in parapet. Extreme NW and 1st return bay from N set in pilaster strip surmounted by open, segmental pediments with sculpted tympana; keyblocked, aediculed windows with blind balusters at 1st floor; 3rd floor architraved, keyblocked window with pediment; bowed cast-iron balcony. WESTERN ELEVATION EXCLUDING NW CORNER: 3 bays, outer bays blank; continuous solid bracketted parapet at 1st floor; canted central bay with pedimented window at 1st floor. SOUTHERN ELEVATION TO SHAMROCK STREET: variation of baroque design with swagged sculpture. Corniced ridge, axial, and wallhead stacks.

Notes
Built for Glasgow Savings Bank.

References
S.R. Archives, D of G 2/2540.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland


yes thats the very one thanks!
Alex Glass

46-48 (INCLUSIVE NOS) ST ANDREWS SQUARE (Ref:32832)

46-48 (INCLUSIVE NOS) ST ANDREWS SQUARE (Ref:32832)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 17/10/1984.



1876-1877. Former tannery and leather warehouse building in Italiante style, built for John Inglis and Co. Rectangular symmetrical 5-storey and basement building with 5-bay elevations to St Andrews Square and Turnbull Street, 9-bay rear elevation. Polished ashlar, painted to ground, red and white brick rear. ST ANDREWS SQUARE ELEVATION: Main entrance to right, pilastered elaborately consoled hood-cornice with balcony over, doorway round-arched with decorative keystone and fanlight. To left, depressed arch pend entrance with bull's head keystone. Shopfront with slender pilastrade interspersed with thicker pilasters. Above ground all windows bipartite, to 1st stilted arched with continuous archivolt and pilaster mullions. Shouldered to 2nd within architraves. Plain architraved bipartites to 3rd. All sash and case windows with plate- glass glazing. Dentil cornice over ground, cill band to 1st and 2nd, eaves band, bracketted cornice, deep plain parapet with intermediate die piers. At angles, raised piers with pediment detail. TURNBULL STREET ELEVATION: details as main elevation, shop front to ground. REAR ELEVATION; 9-bay with single light windows, mostly 4-pane sashes. To centre bay, larger openings, now bricked-up, formerly hoist doors.

Notes
Building inscribed "Tannery Buildings" over door.

References
Gomme and Walker 1987, p.319. J R Hume 1974, p.219.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland










cybers

Like the way this is shaping up might get my backside out and find a few of these myself.
Alex Glass

1 ST ANDREWS SQUARE, ST ANDREWS PARISH CHURCH (CHURCH OF SCO

1 ST ANDREWS SQUARE, ST ANDREWS PARISH CHURCH (CHURCH OF SCOTLAND) (Ref:32830)



Alan Dreghorn, architect, 1739-1756. The design for this important and striking church is based largely upon James Gibb's London masterpiece of St Martin-in-the-Fields (1722), and it heralds a new style for large scale classical church design in Scotland. The interior has London precedents in the plasterwork of James Clayton and the richness of its' fittings are of exceptional quality. Rectangular galleried church, 5 x 7 bays strictly symmetrical with 5-stage steeple, polished ashlar, stonecleaned. Bays marked by giant Corinthian pilasters and angle pilasters. All openings in Gibbsian rusticated surrounds with keystones and bracketted cills, those to ground depressed-arched, those to 1st round-arched. W elevation has steps to giant unfluted Corinthian hexastyle portico 1-bay deep, outer and centre bays to ground have round arched doorways with semi-circular fanlights and double-leaf panelled doors. Inner bays to ground and 1st have niches. Otherwise sash and case windows with small-pane glazing. Dentilled pediment with cartouche in tympanum. E elevation with Venetian window to centre bay, square headed doorways to outer bays with triangular pediments. Flanks 7-bay regularly detailed as above. Polished band course over ground, dentilled cornice. Balustraded parapet with die pedestals supporting urn finials, similar finials to gable apexes. STEEPLE square section to lower 2 stages, oculi to lowest stage, 2nd stage rusticated quoins round-arched windows to each face. Cornice with angle urn finials over 2nd, clockfaces to 3rd. Above this rises octagonal colonnaded drum with dome surmounted by pinnacle with ball finial. INTERIOR: exceptionally lavish 18th century interior, largely unaltered in its finest features of plasterwork and woodwork, however, alterations to the interior were carried out in 1874 by John Carrick, and in 1921 by Peter MacGregor Chalmers. 5-bay interior galleried to 3 sides with giant fluted Corinthian Columns supporting galleries as they rise to support barrel vaulted roof. To W gallery supported by smaller fluted Ionic columns, all with gilded capitals, to E shallow chancel (formerly site of organ). The plasterwork, by Thomas Clayton, and the timberwork are of the highest quality as is the stained glass, mainly by Stephen Adam. The pews are laid out with aisles below the galleries, they are of pine and date from 1874 designed by John Carrick. The gallery fronts are original, carved mahogony in swagged and diapered panels. The fine mahogony octagonal pulpit rises from an elaborately carved baluster shaft also supported by a Corinthian pillar which terminates in a gilded crown. The rococco plasterwork of the vaulted ceiling is the work of Thomas Clayton begun 1753, as presumably is the elaborate gilded plaster surround to the clock in the W wall. The stained glass replaced original clear glazed sash and case windows, it all dates from circa 1874 and is signed by Stephen Adam. The Robert Anderson memorial window to the N gallery is particularly good and Pre- Raphaelite in design. In the chancel are now housed 9 fine mid 18th-century chairs, originally sited in the W gallery as seating for the Provost and magistrates. Flanking the chancel the Willis organ (1874) is now housed in the upper N chamber. Organ pies to rear of chancel. The walls throughout are stencilled and gilded, repainted in 1920's but to a much earlier design.

Notes
St Andrew's became the centrepiece to a symmetrical square of 3-storey terraced houses laid out in 1760's, (now mostly demolished or sadly altered) and set the pattern for later building layout in Glasgow. It is possibly the most important and impressive 18th-century church in Scotland. The architect, Allan Dreghorn (19-6-1764) was a wealthy timber and lead merchant and a prominent number of Glasgow's ruling elite, he held several municipal posts (Treasurer and Bailiff). His skill as an architect is amply attested by St Andrew's Parish Church, his main surviving work. It is presumed that his own workshops provided the carved timberwork for the church.

References
Information from D M Walker. Gomme and Walker 1987, p.58-60. Doak (ed) 10. Information by courtesy of the Buildings of Scotland Research Unit. H M Colvin p.274.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland




















Alex Glass

1 ST ANDREWS SQUARE, ST ANDREWS PARISH CHURCH (CHURCH OF SCOTLAND) (Ref:32830) Part Two





































Alex Glass

54 ST ANDREWS SQUARE AND 51 TURNBULL STREET, FORMER CENTRAL

54 ST ANDREWS SQUARE AND 51 TURNBULL STREET, FORMER CENTRAL POLICE HEADQUARTERS (Ref:32792)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 04/09/1989



A B McDonald, 1903. Irregular plan building with Renaissance details, comprised primarily of offices, court hall, cells, recreation and reception areas, built around a courtyard and designed to conform to an awkward site. 2 and 3-storey bays with attic to corner bays. Red brick with red Dumfriesshire sandstone ashlar dressings. Ashlar base, band, cill and lintel courses, moulded cornice.E (Turnbull Street) elevation: 2-storey, 8-bay entrance block to left, with outer left bay set at an angle. Pend at centre with round, ashlar voussoired archway with Gibbsian detail; enamel-tiled pend; semi-circular wallhead pediment ornately carved with escutcheon, set above 2 recessed 1st floor windows divided by free standing Ionic ashlar column, with swag and strapwork carving to apron below; raised panels flanking 1st floor windows and breaking eaves as dies, bearing wreaths and pendant carving at apron level. 3 windows to each floor to left and right of centre; additional bay to outer right with door and window above. Taller 2-storey pedimented bay of court hall to right (dentil cornice); 4 windows at ground; Venetian window to court room above, set in recessed panel, with Ionic columns, keystone and "Let Glasgow Flourish" armorial carved in tympanum; classical seated male statues flanking pediment each side. 3 2-storey and attic bays to right, with semi-circular pediments to 1st floor windows and small attic windows under eaves.Corner block: 3-storey with parapet and attic. E elevation to Turnbull Street with gabled bay to left and blank wall-plane to right; tripartite doorway in gabled bay, segmentally arched, with keystone and further window flanking; tripartite windows to 1st and 2nd floor in ashlar panel with bracketted carved shallow balcony to 1st floor window, pediment to centre light; large semi-circular timber mullioned attic window in gablehead, with keystone, slightly bowed and consoled 2nd floor cornice supporting decorative wrought-iron window guard. Segmentally pedimented apex bearing date, 1904; mannered obelisk to skewputts. Tripartite windows to corner tower, chamfered at ground, rounded at 1st and 2nd floors; corniced and keystoned 1st floor windows with segmental pediment to centre light; octagonal cap to tower with segmentally arched windows and mullion cornice, lead cupola and tapering finial. 4 bays to N (St Andrews Street), regular fenestration, with 2 corniced 1st floor windows at centre, flanked by pedimented windows; dormer window at centre flanked by wallhead stacks, and with segmental pediment and keystone. 2-storey outer bay to right.Courtyard elevations: severe and functional; red brick and grey ashlar cills and lintels. Small multi-paned windows to cells to W, above open garage bays (formerly serving stable); taller windows to N, some with metal grilles; porch addition at ground.Interior: not seen (1989); apparently with good panelling to court hall.Top-hopper windows predominating; small-pane glazing pattern to attic windows. Grey slates. Skylights.

Notes
A B McDonald was architect to the Office of Public Works. He was also responsible for the Fire Station between Ingram Street and High Street, and Ruchill Hospital. The use of the "Let Glasgow Flourish" armorial and Renaissance details were regular components of his work. Ruchill was similarly designed in red bricks with red sandstone dressings. The carved ornament and statues deserve particular attention. Orginal listing included reference to 2 St Andrews Street.

References
SR Archives D of G 1/9524. DM Stevenson Municipal Glasgow (1914) p284 (illus). Additional information by courtesy of Iain Paterson, Glasgow City Council.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.






























Building at Risk


General Details and Location


Category

AT RISK


Name of Building

Central Police Headquarters (Former)


Other Name(s)

Glasgow Police Museum (Former)


Address

54, St Andrew's Square, Glasgow


Locality



Postcode (click to find nearby buildings)

G1 5PR


Planning Authority (click to search)

Glasgow


Divisional Area (click to search)



Reference No

2732


Listing Category

B


OS Grid Ref

NS 59614 64713


Location Type

Urban


HS Reference No

32792


Description


Irregular plan building with Renaissance details, comprised primarily of offices, court hall, cells, recreation and reception areas, built around a courtyard and designed to conform to an awkward site. 2 and 3-storey bays with attic to corner bays. Red brick with red Dumfriesshire sandstone ashlar dressings. Ashlar base, band, cill and lintel courses, moulded cornice. A B McDonald was architect to the Office of Public Works. He was also responsible for the Fire Station between Ingram Street and High Street, and Ruchill Hospital. The use of the "Let Glasgow Flourish" armorial and Renaissance details were regular components of his work. Ruchill Hospital was similarly designed in red bricks with red sandstone dressings. The carved ornament and statues deserve particular attention. (Historic Scotland)


Building Dates

1903


Architects

A. B. McDonald, Office of Public Works


Category of Risk and Development History


Condition

Fair


Category of Risk

Low


Exemptions to State of Risk



Field Visits

13/10/2010, 16/09/2009, 01/09/2007, June 2004
September 2007, 01/06/2004


Development History


June 2004: External inspection reveals the building to be boarded up at street level, with vegetation growth at the wallhead. It remains unclear whether the building is vacant. September 2007: External inspection reveals that the building has been saved and is now home to Glasgow Police Museum.


September 2009: External inspection finds the building vacant and boarded up. It is in good condition but its future is uncertain as the Police Museum has now moved into new premises. Moved back to AT RISK.


October 2010: External inspection finds the building remains disused. The ground and first floors are boarded up. Plants are gaining ground on flat surfaces, in gutters and along at least one downpipe. Upper floor windows require painting.


Guides to Development


Conservation Area

Glasgow Central


Planning Authority Contact

Shona Simpson


PAC Telephone Number

0141 287 5492


Availability


Current Availability

Unknown


Appointed Agents



Price

Unknown


Occupancy

Vacant


Occupancy Type

N/A


Present/Former Uses

Police Station/Customs and Excise to Museum/Gallery


Name of Owners

Glasgow City Council


Type of Ownership

Local Authority


Information Services


Additional Contacts/Information Source



Bibliography

DM Stevenson Municipal Glasgow (1914) p284 (illus).


Online Resources

The Glasgow Story: http://www.theglasgowstory.com/se...qsearch=central+police&iore=1


Classification

Police Buildings


Original Entry Date

01/06/2004


Date of Last Edit

28/10/2010
Alex Glass

cybers wrote:
Like the way this is shaping up might get my backside out and find a few of these myself.


Would you like an index?  
cybers

I.T would help  
Alex Glass

I have made up a pdf of over 600 items which are in Glasgow. If may not be all but if anyone wants a copy PM me your email address.
Alex Glass

33 TURNBULL STREET, FORMER CHURCH OF ST ANDREW BY THE GREEN

33 TURNBULL STREET, FORMER CHURCH OF ST ANDREW BY THE GREEN (Ref:32790)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category A building and was listed on 06/07/1966



Andrew Hunter and William Paull, joint master masons; Thomas Thomson, wright; built 1750-1. Symmetrical classical church, the first in Glasgow to be built as an Episcopal church. Polished ashlar, stonecleaned. 1988, restoration work carried out and Church altered to suit secular usage. Rectangular 2-storey church with 5-bay elevations to N and S, 3-bay elevations to E and W. N AND S ELEVATIONS: each bay flanked by banded strip pilasters, centre 3 bays shallow advanced and pedimented. All windows single light, those to ground of squarer proportions, rectangular to 1st. All architraved with keystones and bracketted cills. Eaves cornice, plain parapet with urn finials. Pediment with central oculus and urn finialled apex. Slate roofs. E AND W ELEVATIONS: centrally placed doorways, to W with projecting, polygonal, pilastered, single storey porch (an earlier 19th century addition). Above this, a round arched Gibbsian window formerly with stained glass window (probably by Stephen Adam). Otherwise all windows as main elevation, formerly all sash and case with small pane glazing, now (1988) blocked awaiting restoration. To W gable, openwork timber belfry. Pediments with central oculus flanked by ornamental iron tie-plates. INTERIOR, gutted 1987 for re-use as flats. Originally fine (if varied). Collection of Episcopal Church furnishings and fittings of 18th, 19th and 20th centuries all of good quality. The extent to which any original features may be re-instated is not known at time of writing.

Notes
Historically as well as stylistically important as the first Episcopal Church built in Glasgow.

References
Gomme and Walker 1987, p60. Doak (ed) 1977, 12.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland




A lovely little church graveyard as well.







Memorial Stones on the building too.







Alex Glass

And NOW For Something COMPLETELY DIFFERENT
Alex Glass

GLASGOW GREEN, SALTMARKET, SIR WILLIAM COLLINS MEMORIAL FOUN

GLASGOW GREEN, SALTMARKET, SIR WILLIAM COLLINS MEMORIAL FOUNTAIN (Ref:33840)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 16/03/1993



Fountain erected in memory of Sir William Collins, and in recognition of his work for the Temperance movement. Sculptured bronze female figure by J Mossman, 1881, set on a shaft raised high on a tall granite pedestal on which are two basins and bronze bust of Collins.

Notes

References
Williamson, et al, GLASGOW, p457.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland


William Collins











Alex Glass

GLASGOW GREEN, SALTMARKET MACLENNAN ARCH (Ref:33841)

GLASGOW GREEN, SALTMARKET MACLENNAN ARCH (Ref:33841)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 15/12/1970



Triumphal archway, moved to present location 1991-2. composed of fragments salvaged from R & J Adam's Glasgow Assembly Rooms of 1792-6 which was demolished circa 1890. Fragments were first re-assembled under direction of John Carrick, city architect, 1894, and placed in Jail Square, moved 1922 to Glasgow Green, where it served as a terminus to the view down Charlotte Street. Having begun to tilt over, it required dismantling, and the opportunity was taken to move it to the present site, opposite William Stark's Courthouse. One face has Ionic olumns, the other, pilasters.

Notes

References
Gomme and Walker, pp 60-61; Wordsall, THE CITY THAT DISAPPEARED, 1981, p44.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.
















Alex Glass

60-90 (EVEN NOS) TRONGATE AND 19-29 (ODD NOS) ALBION STREET

60-90 (EVEN NOS) TRONGATE AND 19-29 (ODD NOS) ALBION STREET (Ref:32782)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category A building and was listed on 15/12/1970



J T Rochead, 1854. Large Baronial 3-storey with attic building housing shops, offices and warehousing, built for City of Glasgow Bank. Long irregular 14 window elevation to Trongate, regular 24 window elevation to Albion Street. Tower feature to corner rises to 5 storeys with dormers in high saddle-back roof. Painted ashlar. Modern shops to ground destroying original design. TRONGATE ELEVATION: all windows with continuous stepped hoodmoulds, some to 1st shallow segmental-arched, otherwise square headed, all sash and case with plate-glass glazing. All single light except 2 gabled bays which have 3 or 4-light windows under shared hood-mould. Further taller gabled bays to each end, that to E with oriel windows to 1st and 2nd with corbelled embattled parapet. Above rises tower feature with bartizans at angles and crowstepped gables. All gables crowstepped, most with strapwork pediments over in-set raised panels. Pedimented dormers with raised cills and finials. Slate roofs. ALBION STREET ELEVATION: 24 regular single light square headed windows, details as above.

Notes
Known as 60 Trongate. Upgraded to Category A, 12 February 1998.

References
Gomme and Walker 1987, p.322. Information by courtesy of the Buildings of Scotland Research Unit.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland




















Beano

Alex, in your last photo I'm sure that old bank had a wall war plaque years ago about an employee winning a V.C
Alex Glass

173-187 (ODD NOS) TRONGATE AND 17-43 (ODD NOS) STOCKWELL STR

173-187 (ODD NOS) TRONGATE AND 17-43 (ODD NOS) STOCKWELL STREET AND 118-122 (EVEN NOS) OSBORNE STREET (Ref:32779)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 22/03/1977



Frank Burnet and Boston architects, 1923-1929. Warehouses and shops occupying large corner site, 5-storey with sunken basement, 9-bay elevation to Trongate, canted bay across angle to Stockwell Street. 21-bay elevation to Stockwell Street arranged 8-8-5; 6-bay angled elevation to Osborne Street. Polished pink granite ground, otherwise walling red polished sandstone, channelled to 1st. Steel frame withreinforced concrete floors, metal framed windows, flat roof.All elevations similarly detailed, that to Osborne Street plainer. To 2nd, 3rd and 4th windows flanked by giant pilasters, these support deep cornice over 4th with cast-iron balconies to 5th. All windows metal- framed tripartites with small-pane (usually 15-pane) glazing. Parapet over 5th, stepped up at end bays. Canted angle bay with attic storey and octagonal copper dome. Main entrance toTrongate(No 177) at centre. Entrance bay recessed and narrower, central granite doorway with decorative consoles supporting seated statues flanking festooned oculus. Osborne Street elevation similarly detailed but plainer without the giant order pilasters.

Notes

References
Gomme and Walker 1987, p.322. Information by courtesy of the Buildings of Scotland Research Unit.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland
























Alex Glass

Beano wrote:
Alex, in your last photo I'm sure that old bank had a wall war plaque years ago about an employee winning a V.C


Do you mean the Cheque Centre Beano?

I could take a walk in there to ask what happened to it.

Thanks Beano  
Alex Glass

40-50 (EVEN NOS) WILSON STREET WITH 70-74 HUTCHESON STREET,

40-50 (EVEN NOS) WILSON STREET WITH 70-74 HUTCHESON STREET, 117 BRUNSWICK STREET, 149 INGRAM STREET (THE FORMER COUNTY BUILDINGS OR COURT HOUSES) (Ref:32807)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 15/12/1970



Clarke and Bell, Edinburgh, 1842-4, with N section in 1871, and refronted in 1892. Neo-Greek, 3-storey public buildings. Ashlar, channelled to ground 1st floor windows mainly with consoled cornices, some pilastered window reveals at ground and in doors now altered to windows. Comprised of; (a) S section: 1842-4. Original County Building. Ionic hexastyle temple front to Wilson Street, raised on stylobate (ground floor) and flanked by single narrow bays and outer pilastered bays. Ashlar, channelled to ground, frieze sculptured by Walter Buchan on base. Architraved windows. Entrances with consoled cornices in outer bays, crowning entablature and blocking course; one similar return bay; further bays each side elevation, symmetrically arranged toBrunswickStreet. Columnar entrance hall to Wilson Street. (B) CENTRE SECTION: 1842-4. Originally Merchants' House. Main front to Hutcheson Street, incorporating Corinthian colonnade, rising through 1st and 2nd floors and flanked by pilastered bays. Sculpture again by Buchan. (C) N SECTION: 1871, extended 1892; facade reflecting Wilson Street design; with Corinthian hexastyle portico to Ingram Street with central door and 4 windows in plinth, partly re-using old materials. Closely spaced windows on N part of Hutcheson Street; 8 bays to N of Brunswick Street are symmetrical. Plate-glass glazing pattern to sash and case windows; some etched glazing to Brunswick Street. Decorative wrought-iron railings to Brunswick Street, and decorative cast-iron to Wilson Street.

Notes
Won by Clarke and Bell in a competition of 1841. The S part cost $56,000 and the Merchants' House $10,300. In 1888, when the City Chambers opened, the building was reserved for the courts alone. Undergoing interior alterations 1988.

References
Gomme and Walker 1987 p54, 62, 72, 235. Worsdall VICTORIAN CITY 1982, p.74.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland

































Alex Glass

115-137 (ODD NOS) INGRAM STREET AND 118-128 (EVEN NOS) BRUNS

115-137 (ODD NOS) INGRAM STREET AND 118-128 (EVEN NOS) BRUNSWICK STREET (Ref:32732)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 15/12/1970



R W Billings (elevation) and originally John Baird (Plan) 1854 (1986-7) rebuilt behind facade. Large Baronial warehouse occupying corner site with 23-bay facade to Ingram Street and 17-bays toBrunswickStreet. 3 storeys attic and basement. Polished ashlar stonecleaned, stepped roll-moulded basecourse, all openings roll-moulded. INGRAM STREET ELEVATION: 2-16-5 bays with end groups of bays shallow advanced. Pend entrance to extreme left, deeply bracketted canopied tripartite main entrance to right, both with shouldered doorways. All other ground floor openings segmentally arched. To 1st square-headed windows, to 2nd alternately square-headed or shouldered. Bays nearest corner have false plate-tracery to 1st and 2nd. All windows sash and case with 2-pane glazing. Continuous stepped hoodmould to 1st with bosses between windows. 2nd floor windows grouped under hoodmoulds which rise into curvilinear or crowstepped gables. BRUNSWICK STREET ELEVATION: similarly detailed, with projecting corbelled 2-light oriel to extreme right gable. Across Ingram Street, square-plan cap-house corbelled above 3rd floor, saddle-back roof, crowstepped gables. Slate roofs, some tall square section cans at wallhead. Rendered blind flank to E.

Notes
Cast-iron interior now replaced by modern domestic courtyard development.

References
Gomme and Walker 1987, p.308.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland



















Alex Glass

108-112 (EVEN NOS) INGRAM STREET AND 10-12 (EVEN NOS) MONTRO

108-112 (EVEN NOS) INGRAM STREET AND 10-12 (EVEN NOS) MONTROSE STREET (Ref:32741)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 04/09/1989



James Thomson, architect, dated 1898. Substantial Free Style polished red sandstone warehouse, iron-framed construction. 6 storeys over basement with attic. 5 bays to Ingram Street, 14 bays toMontroseStreet. End bays slightly advanced and wider. Windows mainly single light to end bays, bipartite to others. Near centre door to Ingram Street, with shouldered head, windows segmental headed to ground and 1st, all with roll moulded architraves. Sash and case with plate glass, 2-pane glazing. To W angle bays to both elevations at 2nd and 3rd, with 2-bay balconies on corbels; to 2nd pilasters, to 3rd Roman Doric columns. Deep eaves cornice, corbelled over end bays. Deep parapet, Jacobean shaped gables to dormers at end bays, otherwise attic windows grouped in 3's form pilastrade. Diagonal stacks to end bays, slated pavilion roofs.

Notes
Built for J and W Campbell and Company. The drawings, dated January 1897, show a subway link to Campbell's property on the opposite side of Ingram Street.

References
Information by courtesy of the Buildings of Scotland Research Unit. Glasgow City Archives, D of G Ref 1/5506. Additional information from Iain Paterson, Glasgow City Council.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland
















Alex Glass

16-22 (EVEN NOS) MONTROSE STREET (Ref:32765

16-22 (EVEN NOS) MONTROSE STREET (Ref:32765)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 25/09/1984



Built 1878 as leather merchants' warehouse. 5-storey and attic, plain astylar warehouse building now converted to flats, 20-bay frontage with paired windows, roofline with pedimented dormers. Polished red sandstone facade, cast-iron framed. Ground floor has shopfronts, entrances to end bays and paired to centre. All windows single light arranged in pairs with dividing pilasters, engaged columns and round-arched lights to 4th floor. All windows sash and case with plate-glass glazing. Panelled pilasters emphasises central bipartites and end bays, these also have pediments to 1st floor windows. Band courses between floors, deep plain parapet. Pilastered dormers with pediments and urn finials. Slate roofs. Central bays formerly glazed now opened as open gallery access landings.

Notes

References
Information by courtesy of the Buildings of Scotland Research Unit.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland














cybers

You kind of forget about those hidden beauties in and a round the candleriggs  

Nice job Alex
Alex Glass

There is a really hidden one Cybers which I am trying to get photos of but there are two difficulties. Locked gates and lack of space to get a good shopt due to the location. It is inside the back of Candleriggs.
Alex Glass

187 GEORGE STREET, MONTROSE HOUSE (Ref:32707)

187 GEORGE STREET, MONTROSE HOUSE (Ref:32707)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 04/09/1989



Stuart Sim, designed 1939, built post 2nd World War. Symmetrical, 7-storey and basement ashlar, clad steel framed office block. Rectangular elevations of 9-bays to George Street andMontroseStreet. At angle recessed taller 4-window drum tower with vertical fins. Steps at angle to main entrance with good modern wrought-iron balustrade, metal-framed revolving doors, projecting concrete lintel.Bipartite windows to drum and to end bays of each elevation, otherwise tripartite. All metal-framed casements. In drum tower, metal bands separate floors, ashlar to rest of building. Deep parapet over tower with 2 flag poles.Rear elevation with curved glazed stair well at angle, near symmetrical flanking bays with horizontal metal glazing.

Notes
Information courtesy of Bill Jackson of Fountainbridge Telephone Exchange. Converted to hotel use 1999/2000 by Crerar & Partners, architects.

References
Post Office Directories 1953/54.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland












Alex Glass

98 INGRAM STREET, UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE, RAMSHORN THEATR

98 INGRAM STREET, UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE, RAMSHORN THEATRE, FORMER ST PAUL'S AND ST DAVID'S CHURCH, (CHURCH OF SCOTLAND) AND CHURCHYARD AND BOUNDARY RAILINGS (Ref:32740)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category A building and was listed on 15/12/1970.



Thomas Rickman, architect, 1824-1826; Page and Park, conversion to theatre c1990-92. Gothic, cruciform plan church with tall 3-stage tower on S arm centred on axis of Candleriggs. Polished ashlar. Cill course; pointed arched openings with hoodmoulding and carved stops; carved apex finials to gables and pinacles. Long arms with tall symmetrical 2-3-2-light geometric traceried windows; dentiled cornice; crenallated and pinacled parapet. Gable walls, central 3-light lancet with traceried head flanked by strip pilasters rising to traceried pinnacles with conical capping; further narrow lancets. Clasping buttresses at angles rising to pinnacles. Simple lancets to rear. TOWER: entrance at base, 2 narrow panelled doors with trumeau under pointed head in shafted reveals, crocketted mock gable above. Bold buttresses to tower stage with gablets, octagonal piers above rising to pinnacles. Blind arcading and sculpted bands, triple louvred lights to belfry stage, corbelled pierced balustrade. N (REAR) ELEVATION: rubble-built. INTERIOR (seen 2011): entrance hall with carved timber war memorial and plaster-vaulted ceiling. Side aisles removed to church 1886-1887; now open plan foyer with black box theatre auditorium to nave; ribbed plaster ceiling with geometric tiercerons. Stained glass by various artists, mostly of late 19th century (see NOTES). Vaulted crypt with some carved memorial panels to walls and floor.Churchyard: Large well laid out churchyard with burial 'aisles' to NE of church consisting of ashlar walls with inset tombstones. Most tombstones of 19th-century date. Shallow ashlar and coped boundary walls to street with decorative cast-iron railings and gates; gabletted gatepiers with conical capping..

Notes
Place of worship no longer in use as such. The Ramshorn Theatre is an important early example of Scottish Gothic revival architecture. Its fine stonework detailing, including traceried lancet window and sculpted bands along with landmark tower make it a notable part of the streetscape which terminates a vista. This former church contains a good collection of stained glass depicting various stories from the Old and New Testament, many of which are by W and J J Kier of Glasgow. The later alteration to form part of the University of Strathclyde has retained the majority of the architectural detailing of the original church, particularly to the exterior. Thomas Rickman was a self-taught architect who was renowned for Gothic detailing. In 1812 he designed a number of churches with John Cragg, a wealthy ironmaster with an interest in building. Their work includes St George's, Everton and St Michael's Toxteth, both in Liverpool. In 1817 he established his own architectural practice and in an effort to gain work entered a large number of competitions. He designed a number of domestic and public buildings all over England, such as Exhibition Room for the Birmingham Society of Artists (1829) and the New Court at St John's College, Cambridge (1827-31). He is best known for his church architecture and St David's Church is his only known work in Scotland. Buildings of Scotland notes that Thomas Rickman provided 'Working Drawings with some alterations' on the basis of plans drawn up by James Cleland after a meeting with Rickman on the site. The Church was sold by the Church of Scotland in February 1983 to the University of Strathclyde for £5. The Ramshorn Theatre opened in 1992 and it now functions (2011) as the University of Strathclyde Drama Centre and it is a performance space. The origins of the university began in 1796 when Professor John Anderson left instructions in his will for the provision of an institution that was 'founded for the good of mankind and improvement in science'. By the 1890s this institution had developed rapidly and in 1903 built the Royal College building, George Street (see separate listing). The student population continued to grow, particularly following WWII and in the 1950s the area immediately to the N of the Royal College was developed to provide further facilities including a new engineering building, student union and chaplaincy centre. In 1964 the enlarged Royal College was granted the Royal Charter and became the University of Strathclyde. Keen to maintain a presence in city centre the renowned Modernist architect Robert Matthew drew up plans for the expansion of the campus to the E of the Royal College building, to provide additional buildings for science and technology disciplines as well as accommodation for the newly introduced arts and social sciences subjects. This original masterplan has been continually developed as land became available for the campus, following the demolition of tenements and other public and commercial buildings. The University has also acquired and adapted existing building adjacent to the campus for their use, such as the Barony Church and the Ramshorn Theatre (see separate listings). List description and statutory address updated as part of the Theatres Thematic Study 2010 and the University of Strathclyde Review 2010-12.

References
1st edition Ordnance Survey map (1856-9); Williamson et al, The Buildings of Scotland - Glasgow (1990) p157-158. Ramshorn (1994), University of Strathclyde Archives D726.5094. H Colvin, A Biographical Dictionary of British Architects 1600-1840 (1995) pp812-817. www.strath.ac.uk/culture/ramshorn/info (accessed 22 March 2010) Drawings of Ramshorn Theatre (Various Dates) University of Strathclyde Archives OS69/1/15. Information courtesy of owner including Ramshorn Theatre: Stained Glass Windows CD.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland

[img]Thomas Rickman, architect, 1824-1826; Page and Park, conversion to theatre c1990-92. Gothic, cruciform plan church with tall 3-stage tower on S arm centred on axis of Candleriggs. Polished ashlar. Cill course; pointed arched openings with hoodmoulding and carved stops; carved apex finials to gables and pinacles. Long arms with tall symmetrical 2-3-2-light geometric traceried windows; dentiled cornice; crenallated and pinacled parapet. Gable walls, central 3-light lancet with traceried head flanked by strip pilasters rising to traceried pinnacles with conical capping; further narrow lancets. Clasping buttresses at angles rising to pinnacles. Simple lancets to rear. TOWER: entrance at base, 2 narrow panelled doors with trumeau under pointed head in shafted reveals, crocketted mock gable above. Bold buttresses to tower stage with gablets, octagonal piers above rising to pinnacles. Blind arcading and sculpted bands, triple louvred lights to belfry stage, corbelled pierced balustrade. N (REAR) ELEVATION: rubble-built. INTERIOR (seen 2011): entrance hall with carved timber war memorial and plaster-vaulted ceiling. Side aisles removed to church 1886-1887; now open plan foyer with black box theatre auditorium to nave; ribbed plaster ceiling with geometric tiercerons. Stained glass by various artists, mostly of late 19th century (see NOTES). Vaulted crypt with some carved memorial panels to walls and floor.Churchyard: Large well laid out churchyard with burial 'aisles' to NE of church consisting of ashlar walls with inset tombstones. Most tombstones of 19th-century date. Shallow ashlar and coped boundary walls to street with decorative cast-iron railings and gates; gabletted gatepiers with conical capping..

Notes
Place of worship no longer in use as such. The Ramshorn Theatre is an important early example of Scottish Gothic revival architecture. Its fine stonework detailing, including traceried lancet window and sculpted bands along with landmark tower make it a notable part of the streetscape which terminates a vista. This former church contains a good collection of stained glass depicting various stories from the Old and New Testament, many of which are by W and J J Kier of Glasgow. The later alteration to form part of the University of Strathclyde has retained the majority of the architectural detailing of the original church, particularly to the exterior. Thomas Rickman was a self-taught architect who was renowned for Gothic detailing. In 1812 he designed a number of churches with John Cragg, a wealthy ironmaster with an interest in building. Their work includes St George's, Everton and St Michael's Toxteth, both in Liverpool. In 1817 he established his own architectural practice and in an effort to gain work entered a large number of competitions. He designed a number of domestic and public buildings all over England, such as Exhibition Room for the Birmingham Society of Artists (1829) and the New Court at St John's College, Cambridge (1827-31). He is best known for his church architecture and St David's Church is his only known work in Scotland. Buildings of Scotland notes that Thomas Rickman provided 'Working Drawings with some alterations' on the basis of plans drawn up by James Cleland after a meeting with Rickman on the site. The Church was sold by the Church of Scotland in February 1983 to the University of Strathclyde for £5. The Ramshorn Theatre opened in 1992 and it now functions (2011) as the University of Strathclyde Drama Centre and it is a performance space. The origins of the university began in 1796 when Professor John Anderson left instructions in his will for the provision of an institution that was 'founded for the good of mankind and improvement in science'. By the 1890s this institution had developed rapidly and in 1903 built the Royal College building, George Street (see separate listing). The student population continued to grow, particularly following WWII and in the 1950s the area immediately to the N of the Royal College was developed to provide further facilities including a new engineering building, student union and chaplaincy centre. In 1964 the enlarged Royal College was granted the Royal Charter and became the University of Strathclyde. Keen to maintain a presence in city centre the renowned Modernist architect Robert Matthew drew up plans for the expansion of the campus to the E of the Royal College building, to provide additional buildings for science and technology disciplines as well as accommodation for the newly introduced arts and social sciences subjects. This original masterplan has been continually developed as land became available for the campus, following the demolition of tenements and other public and commercial buildings. The University has also acquired and adapted existing building adjacent to the campus for their use, such as the Barony Church and the Ramshorn Theatre (see separate listings). List description and statutory address updated as part of the Theatres Thematic Study 2010 and the University of Strathclyde Review 2010-12.

References
1st edition Ordnance Survey map (1856-9); Williamson et al, The Buildings of Scotland - Glasgow (1990) p157-158. Ramshorn (1994), University of Strathclyde Archives D726.5094. H Colvin, A Biographical Dictionary of British Architects 1600-1840 (1995) pp812-817. www.strath.ac.uk/culture/ramshorn/info (accessed 22 March 2010) Drawings of Ramshorn Theatre (Various Dates) University of Strathclyde Archives OS69/1/15. Information courtesy of owner including Ramshorn Theatre: Stained Glass Windows CD.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland

[img]Thomas Rickman, architect, 1824-1826; Page and Park, conversion to theatre c1990-92. Gothic, cruciform plan church with tall 3-stage tower on S arm centred on axis of Candleriggs. Polished ashlar. Cill course; pointed arched openings with hoodmoulding and carved stops; carved apex finials to gables and pinacles. Long arms with tall symmetrical 2-3-2-light geometric traceried windows; dentiled cornice; crenallated and pinacled parapet. Gable walls, central 3-light lancet with traceried head flanked by strip pilasters rising to traceried pinnacles with conical capping; further narrow lancets. Clasping buttresses at angles rising to pinnacles. Simple lancets to rear. TOWER: entrance at base, 2 narrow panelled doors with trumeau under pointed head in shafted reveals, crocketted mock gable above. Bold buttresses to tower stage with gablets, octagonal piers above rising to pinnacles. Blind arcading and sculpted bands, triple louvred lights to belfry stage, corbelled pierced balustrade. N (REAR) ELEVATION: rubble-built. INTERIOR (seen 2011): entrance hall with carved timber war memorial and plaster-vaulted ceiling. Side aisles removed to church 1886-1887; now open plan foyer with black box theatre auditorium to nave; ribbed plaster ceiling with geometric tiercerons. Stained glass by various artists, mostly of late 19th century (see NOTES). Vaulted crypt with some carved memorial panels to walls and floor.Churchyard: Large well laid out churchyard with burial 'aisles' to NE of church consisting of ashlar walls with inset tombstones. Most tombstones of 19th-century date. Shallow ashlar and coped boundary walls to street with decorative cast-iron railings and gates; gabletted gatepiers with conical capping..

Notes
Place of worship no longer in use as such. The Ramshorn Theatre is an important early example of Scottish Gothic revival architecture. Its fine stonework detailing, including traceried lancet window and sculpted bands along with landmark tower make it a notable part of the streetscape which terminates a vista. This former church contains a good collection of stained glass depicting various stories from the Old and New Testament, many of which are by W and J J Kier of Glasgow. The later alteration to form part of the University of Strathclyde has retained the majority of the architectural detailing of the original church, particularly to the exterior. Thomas Rickman was a self-taught architect who was renowned for Gothic detailing. In 1812 he designed a number of churches with John Cragg, a wealthy ironmaster with an interest in building. Their work includes St George's, Everton and St Michael's Toxteth, both in Liverpool. In 1817 he established his own architectural practice and in an effort to gain work entered a large number of competitions. He designed a number of domestic and public buildings all over England, such as Exhibition Room for the Birmingham Society of Artists (1829) and the New Court at St John's College, Cambridge (1827-31). He is best known for his church architecture and St David's Church is his only known work in Scotland. Buildings of Scotland notes that Thomas Rickman provided 'Working Drawings with some alterations' on the basis of plans drawn up by James Cleland after a meeting with Rickman on the site. The Church was sold by the Church of Scotland in February 1983 to the University of Strathclyde for £5. The Ramshorn Theatre opened in 1992 and it now functions (2011) as the University of Strathclyde Drama Centre and it is a performance space. The origins of the university began in 1796 when Professor John Anderson left instructions in his will for the provision of an institution that was 'founded for the good of mankind and improvement in science'. By the 1890s this institution had developed rapidly and in 1903 built the Royal College building, George Street (see separate listing). The student population continued to grow, particularly following WWII and in the 1950s the area immediately to the N of the Royal College was developed to provide further facilities including a new engineering building, student union and chaplaincy centre. In 1964 the enlarged Royal College was granted the Royal Charter and became the University of Strathclyde. Keen to maintain a presence in city centre the renowned Modernist architect Robert Matthew drew up plans for the expansion of the campus to the E of the Royal College building, to provide additional buildings for science and technology disciplines as well as accommodation for the newly introduced arts and social sciences subjects. This original masterplan has been continually developed as land became available for the campus, following the demolition of tenements and other public and commercial buildings. The University has also acquired and adapted existing building adjacent to the campus for their use, such as the Barony Church and the Ramshorn Theatre (see separate listings). List description and statutory address updated as part of the Theatres Thematic Study 2010 and the University of Strathclyde Review 2010-12.

References
1st edition Ordnance Survey map (1856-9); Williamson et al, The Buildings of Scotland - Glasgow (1990) p157-158. Ramshorn (1994), University of Strathclyde Archives D726.5094. H Colvin, A Biographical Dictionary of British Architects 1600-1840 (1995) pp812-817. www.strath.ac.uk/culture/ramshorn/info (accessed 22 March 2010) Drawings of Ramshorn Theatre (Various Dates) University of Strathclyde Archives OS69/1/15. Information courtesy of owner including Ramshorn Theatre: Stained Glass Windows CD.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland








































Alex Glass

201 NORTH STREET, KENT ROAD, AND BERKELEY STREET, MITCHELL L

201 NORTH STREET, KENT ROAD, AND BERKELEY STREET, MITCHELL LIBRARY (Ref:33095)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 15/12/1970



Wm B Whitie, 1906-11. Edwardian Baroque public library. 3 storeys and basement. Symmetrical. Square plan, later infilling in 2 parts up to facade of former St Andrew's Halls, now Mitchell Library. 18 bays with 2 7-bay returns. Polished light ashlar, channelled at ground floor, granite plinth. Sash and case and casement windows, multi-light glazing. MAIN ELEVATION: bays arranged 3-3-6-3-3, bowed centre, advanced and raised ends with giant order of semi-engaged Roman Doric columned main entrance, scroll keyblocked doorpiece with rusticated bands, triglyph frieze, mutule cornice, parapet with seated figure sculpture by John Miller (London) breaking through keyblocked staircase windows above cupola dome with elliptically-headed, keyblocked, windows, standing figure sculpture by T J Clapperton (London). LINKING BAYS: ground floor windows keyblocked with flat voussoirs, corniced 1st floor windows, architraved 2nd floor windows, bracketted cornice balustrade. OUTER ADVANCED BAYS: giant Ionic columns in antis through 1st and 2nd floors. Corniced 1st floor windows, scroll keyblocked 2nd floor windows, dentil band, modillion cornice and balustrade. 7-bay return elevations continuing main detailing with giant order of columns as main elevation. Keyblocked entrances in W bays. INTERIOR: open well circular staircase with stone balustraded parapet. Extensive wood-carving in public areas, main reading room and Jeffrey Library. Coved ceilings with plasterwork escutcheons.

Notes
Joinery and Carpentry John Cochrane. Mahogany bookcases... Wylie and Lochead, marble linings Galbraith and Winton.

References
S.R. Archives, D of G 2/632, 1906. Information by courtesy of Building of Scotland Research Unit.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland
























Alex Glass

GRANVILLE STREET, BERKELEY STREET AND KENT ROAD MITCHELL THE

GRANVILLE STREET, BERKELEY STREET AND KENT ROAD MITCHELL THEATRE, FORMERLY ST ANDREW'S HALLS (Ref:33036)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category A building and was listed on 06/07/1966.



James Sellars, 1873-77, interior reconstructed. Sculpture by John Mossman at 1st floor. WIlliam Mossman at ground floor. Schinkelesque Greek classical halls. 4 storeys, 24 bays toGranvilleStreet and 3 return bays to Berkeley Street and Kent Road. Symmetrical polished ashlar, banded at ground floor. Central 3-bay entrance with continuous lugged projecting architraved doorpiece with paterae surround and stylised anthemion acroters; 2 atlantes in antis and sculpted relieving pilasters; 3 doorways with outer panelled doors and carved timber fanlights; pilastered, corniced vestibule with anthemion frieze. 4 bold, full-height dividing piers. Plinth, recessed in central bays to form podium for cast-iron lamp standards. Ground floor breaking forward to form giant pedestals for 4 sculpted figure groups; plain ground floor windows in deep embrasures, plain ground floor entablature with projecting cornice. 1ST AND FLOOR: giant order of Greek Ionic fluted columns across full-width arranged 5-9-5 bays with anthemion detail to necking and plain entablature, divided by outer and central spacings bays; central bays deeply recessed; 19 pilastered windows at 1st floor with paterae, 2nd graduated panels framing sculpted anthemia; plain entablature with cornice. ATTIC: blank central bays with plain full-height parapet, 5-bay raised outer sections with 4 caryatids in antis and coupled pilasters to each bay framing freize with sculpted relief lettering: northern bays: RAPHAEL- WATT- M-ANGELO- NEWTON- FLAXMAN, southern: PURCELL- BACH- HANDEL- MOZART- BEETHOVEN plain entablature; cornice. RETURNS BAYS TO BERKELEY STREET AND KENT ROAD: low margined entry; dwarf pilastered side entrance with relieving internal pilasters. 3 pilastered 1st floor windows 2 panels above repeating main elevation; 3 attic windows with glazing bars.

Notes
Built in 1873-7 as the St Andrew's Halls at a cost of £80,000, this monumental neo-Greek building is an outstanding example of its type. It is also notable for its sculpture by the renowned sculptors, John and William Mossman. It forms a major part of the streetscape. Cunningham of Liverpool took the design to sketch-plan stage, however, the degree to which his scheme influenced the final design by James Sellars is not known. The building was bought by the Corporation of the City of Glasgow in 1889. It was gutted by fire in November 1962 and the interior of the front part was remodelled in 1972-80 by Sir Frank Mears and Partners to house the Mitchell Theatre. The rear was rebuilt and absorbed into the neighbouring Mitchell Library (see separate listing). References from previous list description: B A Jan 2nd 1880. Doak (ed) 1977 No 89. Gomme and Walker, 1968 pp 155-6, 285. List description updated as part of the Theatres Thematic Study 2010.

References
2nd edition Ordnance Survey map (1892-7); Williamson et al, The Buildings of Scotland - Glasgow (1990) p279. Dictionary of Scottish Architects, www.scottisharchitects.org.uk .

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland























Alex Glass

109-123 (ODD NOS) CANDLERIGGS (Ref:32645

109-123 (ODD NOS) CANDLERIGGS (Ref:32645)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 04/09/1989.



Circa 1800. Long astylar tenement now partly converted to flats with modern "neo Classical" shopfronts to ground. 4-storey, 13-bay grouped 4-3-3-3. Polished ashlar walling, stonecleaned. All windows single light with rear stair turrets with modern roofs; moulded cills, all sash and case with 12-pane glazing. Continuous cill band to 2nd. Moulded eaves cornice, axial stacks.

Notes
Probably part of J and W Carswell's development providing burners and domestic accommodation.

References

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland




Alex Glass

125-127 (ODD NOS) CANDLERIGGS (Ref:32646

125-127 (ODD NOS) CANDLERIGGS (Ref:32646)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category C building and was listed on 04/09/1989.



F A MacDonald & Partners, reinforced concrete engineers. Designed 1937, completed late 1948. Commercial corner building. 3-storey with wide bays flanking canted angle. Reinforced concrete structure faced with ashlar with painted metal panels vertically between 4-light metal-framed windows, all set in panels. Blocking course raised at angle. Inside reset stones "1597" Blissit be ye Lord our God for all his giftis". Rebuilt 1824. Removed from building on this site and placed here 1939.

Notes
Office development built for George Calder Dunbar, builder. Engineers drawings signed by Dunbar himself.

References
Glasgow City Archives, Dean of Guild Ref. 1937/75. Information courtesy of Iain Paterson, Glasgow City Council.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland






Alex Glass

158 INGRAM STREET, AND 2 JOHN STREET, HUTCHESON'S HOSPITAL (

158 INGRAM STREET, AND 2 JOHN STREET, HUTCHESON'S HOSPITAL (Ref:32744)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category A building and was listed on 06/11/1966.



David Hamilton, architect, 1802-1805, interior recast by John Baird II 1876. Classically detailed with Roman motifs. Built to replace earlier (17th century) Hospital as a home for aged men. 2-storey and attic with tall slender tower and spire. Polished painted ashlar, channelled at ground. INGRAM STREET ELEVATION: 5-bay symmetrical front. Central doorway has Roman Doric porch and double-leaf panelled doors. Plain rectangular windows to ground. 1st floor is double-height with inner 3 bays recessed in the form of a colonnade. Corinthian columns in antis flank large square-headed consoled windows with panel frieze above. To end bays Corinthian pilasters flank niches (an alteration of 1824) with statues of George and Thomas Hutcheson (the founders) carved in 1649 by JAMES COLQUHOUN, and resited from the original 17th-century Hospital. The glazing is 6-pane to 1st, 2-pane to ground with partly leaded coloured glass to lower panes. Colonnade supports frieze with inscription recording the founders, cornice and blocking course. Above this scroll pediment to centre, to end bays oval "Roman" alters as finial feature linked by balustrade. JOHN STREET ELEVATION: simpler elevation of 2 wide bays. Pilastered doorpiece to left, tripartite window to right. To 1st shallow pedimented tripartites with consoles. These are flanked by paired pilasters. Cornice with solid deep parapet above, tripartite attic windows, that to right blind. Wallhead corniced stack with octagonal cans. TOWER: square based, 4-stage tower with slim needle spire. 1st stage with round-arched window, 2nd with louvred openings flanked by paired Tuscan columns set across angle. These support projecting cornice; clock face to 3rd stage. 4th stage Ionic tempietto from which rises spire surmounted by gilded orb and cross. INTERIOR: completely recast by John Baird II in 1876, in heavy classical style with lavish detail. Main Hall to 1st floor, windows and doors with heavy architraves and pediments supported on moulded consoles, double-leaf panelled doors. Windows with painted glass panels to upper and lower parts. Panelling to wainscott level throughout. 2 chimneypieces with Ionic columns supporting elaborate entablature. Ceiling divided into 3 sections with moulded dentil cornice and good ceiling rose, decorative iron ventilators. Scale and platt stair with carved timber balusters.

Notes
Important street scape value as formal end to Hutcheson Street. Owned by National Trust for Scotland.

References
Gomme and Walker 1987, p. . Doak (ed) 1977. Information by courtesy of the Buildings of Scotland Research Unit.

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.


























Alex Glass

I will be trying to add a bit of information into some posts.

Any which are classified as Buildings at Risk I will post the most up to date information so please take a look at previous pages to see lots more detail about these buildings
fastnet

Re: 187 GEORGE STREET, MONTROSE HOUSE (Ref:32707)

Alex Glass wrote:
187 GEORGE STREET, MONTROSE HOUSE (Ref:32707)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 04/09/1989




Great thread and info Alex.

This is one building I would never have considered as listed.
Alex Glass

me neither Fastnet

I was totally surprised when I seen it listed.

There are loads of different types of buildings etc that are listed and although many will not be a surprise there are a few that are unexplainable

I have updated three posts to reflect their status as Buildings at Risk. I will try and post information like this in future posts I load up
Alex Glass

159-161 (ODD NOS) INGRAM STREET WITH 103 HUTCHESON STREET (R

159-161 (ODD NOS) INGRAM STREET WITH 103 HUTCHESON STREET (Ref:32733)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow  Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 04/09/1989.



Description

Circa 1860. 4-storey Italianate warehouse with painted ashlar with modern shop fronts at ground. Dentil cornice above ground floor; consoled cornice above 1st floor, and at main cornice latter with raised panels between consoles; lintel courses to 2nd floor and cill course to 3rd floor windows; rusticated pilaster strip quoins. 6-bay to Ingram Street, 5-bay to Hutcheson Street. Moulded panels between 1st floor windows, broad pilasters dividing 2nd with conch windowheads. 3rd floor windows architraved and with bracketted cills. Pedimented and pilastered dormers in slated mansard roof. Plate-glass sash and case windows.

Notes

Alterations made to the property by Thomson, Sandilands and MacLeod, for John Glen and Co Ltd.

References

B, 16 October 1931, p.650. Gomme and Walker 1987, p.314.


© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland









Alex Glass

102-104 BRUNSWICK STREET, KNOWN AS 104 BRUNSWICK STREET (Ref

102-104 BRUNSWICK STREET, KNOWN AS 104 BRUNSWICK STREET (Ref:32627)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow  Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 15/12/1970.



Description

1859, R W Billings. Bizarrely detailed Gothic warehouse, 3-storey 10-bay with extreme right 2 bays paired and narrower; polished ashlar. Doorways to 5th and 8th (from left), bays, large vehicle entrance to 9th and 10th bays. Main entrance to centre, unusual semi-octagonal door head with heavily moulded octagonal oculus above. Double leaf panelled doors. All other openings to ground and 1st floors square headed with cut away top angles. 2nd floor windows with semi-octagonal heads, all windows sash and case with plate glass glazing. Stepped band of moulding to basement, continuous hood-mould to 1st linking windows in pairs. To 2nd continuous hood moulds, coped parapet rising to chevron between tall wall head stacks with paired diagonal cans. End skews with coped stacks, slate roofs.

Notes

B group with 115-137 Ingram Street and 118-128Brunswick  Street, also by R W Billings.

References

Gomme and Walker, 1987, p.308.


© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland


















norrie

Hi Alex, you have put a lot of work into this thread
The one your trying to get access to, is it on the LHS of Candlelriggs heading up to Ingram st, across from the old Fruit Market?
If so I have taken that shot some time ago
When I find it in my files I will post it
Alex Glass

Yeah Norrie

It is called Patrick Thomas Court

I nearly managed to access it one day but wasn't sure I would get back out

norrie

Hi Alex, Ok I think I have done it years ago in B&W but more the rear of the building in Candleriggs, however I got in a couple of years ago and took other shots
I cant get into my external HD just now, will check it tomorrow
Hate locked gates
Alex Glass

no hurry Norrie

Thanks
discominer

Nice work Alex, these buildings don't get as much attention as they deserve.
Delmont St Xavier

Is there anywhere you can find out why a building was listed and what parts of it are listed?
Alex Glass

Historic Scotland's website is were I get the information and the details that are stated are the parts that are listed.

There are various reasons why a building can be listed.

Happy to explain in more details at some point  
norrie

Hi Alex, I think this is the courtyard your looking for, the building on the left?
Taken August 2011







This is the shot I took in 1990, took over 20 years to get what i should have taken in the first place
Alex Glass

PROPERTY TO REAR OF 100 BRUNSWICK STREET, 85 CANDLERIGGS PAT

PROPERTY TO REAR OF 100 BRUNSWICK STREET, 85 CANDLERIGGS PATRICK THOMAS COURT (Ref:46590)

This building is in the Glasgow, City Of Council and the Glasgow Burgh. It is a category B building and was listed on 24/01/2000.

norrie wrote:
Hi Alex, I think this is the courtyard your looking for, the building on the left?
Taken August 2011







This is the shot I took in 1990, took over 20 years to get what i should have taken in the first place


Thanks Norrie this is the exact location

Here is the listing

Description
Possibly Robert W Billings, mid 19th century with later additions and alterations. Symmetrical 3-storey, 15-bay, rectangular-plan former warehouse with 3-bay, shaped gable at centre; crowstepped gables to outer left and right. Cream sandstone ashlar to front and W side (Brunswick Street); rubble to E side (Candleriggs); ashlar dressings throughout. Flush base course; string course dividing ground and 1st floors; cill courses at 1st and 2nd floors; moulded eaves course. Stop-chamfered openings at ground; chamfered openings at 1st floor; stop-chamfered openings at 2nd floor; roll-moulded openings to W. NE (ENTRANCE) ELEVATION: slightly advanced, corniced doorpiece centred at ground with blocked opening; roll-moulded, shouldered-arched surround with decorative motifs in border. Shouldered-arched window aligned at 1st floor with shouldered hoodmould; corbelled apron beneath arched window at 2nd floor; arched hoodmould; circular window centred in shaped gablehead above. Blocked windows at ground in 6 bays to left and 6 bays to right of centre; single windows in all bays at both floors above. Architraved surrounds to corniced entrances at ground to outer left and right; square-headed hoodmoulds to single windows at 1st floor; gabled hoodmoulds to single windows at 2nd floor; crowstepped gableheads above.NW (SIDE/BRUNSWICK STREET) ELEVATION: 4-bay. Steps to 2-leaf timber door at ground off-set to left of centre; blocked window to right; arched hoodmould framing shield and swag above; blocked window at ground to outer right; square-headed pend opening to outer left. Shouldered-arched windows at 1st floor in 2 central bays; shouldered hoodmoulds; single windows to left and right. Single windows in all bays at 2nd floor (arched hoodmoulds and crowstepped gableheads above 2 central openings).SE (SIDE/CANDLERIGGS) ELEVATION: blind gable end with various blocked openings.Predominantly 4-pane glazing in timber sash and case windows; blocked openings in part. Grey slate roof. Corniced apex stack to SE; cans missing. Modern ventilation stack to N.INTERIOR: not seen 1999.

Notes
Empty 1999. Simpler, but stylistically similar to Billings' nearby projects at Nos 102-104 Brunswick Street (1859) and Nos 115-137 Ingram Street & 118-128 Brunswick Street (1854-56) - see separate list entries. Entered via pends from Brunswick Street to the W andCandleriggsto the E.

References
Ordnance Survey map, 1856-7 (evident).

© Crown copyright, Historic Scotland.
norrie

Hi Alex, glad I was able to help, pity I didn't, realise about its listing status and taken some closer shots
cell

Great work Alex, some real detail there, there are so many buildings with an interesting past that people just walk by without appreciating them.

Not sure how familiar you are with pastmap on the RCAHMS site

http://pastmap.org.uk/

Zoom into the map down to OS scale and select the “listed buildings” layer from the right, this brings up all the listed buildings in that area which can be clicked on to bring up the Historic Scotland record.  If you select the Canmore layer you can click through to the RCAHMS record. Using either can bring up good info on any old buildings or sites that you come across during a wander.
Hawick_1987

cell wrote:
Great work Alex, some real detail there, there are so many buildings with an interesting past that people just walk by without appreciating them.

Not sure how familiar you are with pastmap on the RCAHMS site

http://pastmap.org.uk/

Zoom into the map down to OS scale and select the “listed buildings” layer from the right, this brings up all the listed buildings in that area which can be clicked on to bring up the Historic Scotland record.  If you select the Canmore layer you can click through to the RCAHMS record. Using either can bring up good info on any old buildings or sites that you come across during a wander.


Excellent work as per Alex. Cell, thanks for the link - great resource that I can use for my studies!
cybers


Briggait by David C Laurie, on Flickr

The Briggait is a beautiful Grade A listed building in Glasgow’s medieval quarter, the Merchant City. Originally built in 1873, the Briggait was the city’s fish market for over 100 years. It has now been transformed into a vibrant new home for up to 100 visual artists and cultural organisations.
fastnet

   
norrie

Hi Cybers looks good at night.
Glad to see it being put to use

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