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Alex Glass

Paisley

Heres one for HH



Paisley

White Cart River in foreground; old mill beside rapids on left. Paisley Abbey (twelfth century) top right; Town Hall centre. Open space resulting from recent clearance of decayed nineteenth-century tenements.

1958
Len Scaps

Looks as if Clanford the Ford dealers ( later Peoples, then Arnold Clark) were in Lonend even back then...
HollowHorn

Alex, looks as if your photo was taken from one of the upper stories of the Anchor Mill, now converted to private flats. The 'rapids' are actually known as  'The Hammills' The 'Old Mill' is now the Watermill Hotel.

Len, is that not Bridge St. instead of Lonend that we are looking at?

Here is a photo looking in the opposite direction from a later bridge below the Hammills (Watermill hotel to the right):
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/32/46177917_ec4a6f8eaf_b.jpg

The Watermill Hotel (Anchor Mill to the left):
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/29/46070364_1b06cd2576_b.jpg


And an excellent story about The Hammills, here:
http://www.paisley.org.uk/history/tailingthelinn.php
Alex Glass

Thanks for the info LS and HH

I know you would have more information HH.

Great photos      
Len Scaps

HollowHorn wrote:


Len, is that not Bridge St. instead of Lonend that we are looking at?



You're quite right, my mistake. That garage will be where Budget Tyres are now then?
neilmc

Barshaw Park, Paisley, 1980 (Canon AT1, Ilford HP5 film):-

Alex Glass

Yet another great photo Neil.  

Thanks

Maybe some others will post some photos of Paisley.
neilmc

Cheers Alex. Here's a different angle on it, but my sister won't thank me for it!

In this view you can see the East lodge house and some more of Glasgow Road. In the distance is Bathgo Hill, part of Ralston Golf Course:-

Alex Glass

They are great time pieces Neil.

The old Adidas bag looks fantastic.
James

Luxury flats to replace fire-hit historic building




THE fire-ravaged site of one of Paisley's most historic buildings is to be
turned into luxury flats.


The former Halftime School in Maxwellton Street has lain derelict for 10 years
after it was destroyed in a massive blaze.

It was operating as the Institute nightclub when it was gutted in a fire in
July 1997 and suffered further damage a year later in severe storms.

The building was hailed as one of Scotland's best designed schools when it
opened in 1886 but only the main entrance remains intact.
advertisement

Developers are planning to shore up its remains and build 40 flats behind the
B-listed facade.

Neige Developments has secured planning permission for 10 two-bedroom and 30
one-bedroom flats to be build over three storeys.

A report before Renfrewshire's planning board said: "The history of the site
has been lengthy.

"The objective had been to seek a full restoration of the building for residential
use but the applicant has advised such a project would not viable.

"The development is acceptable and it would ensure the front facade of this
important listed building is restored."

The Halftime School was commissioned by the Coats family to educate child mill
workers. Female workers would attend the school and work in the mills on alternate
days.

The Institute nightclub sustained more than £750,000 of damage in the 1997 blaze.




James H
Stuball

Ohhh nice.... thet took their time selling that off.

It was owned by Carnegies Leisure group. When I worked for them, I had to go round there a few times with the company joiners to close and re-lock the gates. On one occasion, we had to cut down a large sign someone had erected to advertise their gardening buisness.... bloody thing nearly killed us.

All the stonework lying around the building was numbered after the fire, with the intention of rebuilding it. Never happened though and was possibly an insurance job like a couple of other clubs. A certain company tradesmen did joke every so often that he was still waiting to get paid for that job
HollowHorn

Billy Smart's Circus 1960
James

Paisley Canal 1975




James H
James

Closing down



PLANS to regenerate Paisley town centre have suffered a major blow after three
stores shut down within days.


Staff at JJB Sports, The Rangers Shop, and Stead & Simpson were told their
branches were closing towards the end of last week.

More than a dozen prime sites on High Street and Moss Street now lie empty
despite a drive to attract new retailers.

Workers at the two sports shops have been told they will be relocated to
other stores while five staff at Stead & Simpson have been laid off after
the shoe chain was bought over by a rival firm.

It's understood town centre bosses are so worried about the number of To
Let signs springing up they are considering removing them altogether.

A Renfrewshire Council source said: "We are looking at other ways to advertise
the vacant units. We remain committed to regenerating the town centre and
we don't believe there is any need to panic."




James H
James

Plan to revive town centre by returning cars to streets



CARS are to be offered better access to Paisley town centre after more than 10 years
of campaigning by struggling shop owners.


Roads surrounding the High Street, which have been limited to buses and taxis
for years, will be opened up as part of an action plan to attract more shoppers.

The proposals follow an 11-year battle to reopen the heart of the town to all
traffic after key through-routes were turned into one-way roads and bus lanes
when the High Street was pedestrianised in 1997.

Studies show that Braehead, with its free parking, has contributed to a 50% sales
slump in recent years.

Councillors will now be asked to back a series of traffic orders to open up all of
Causeyside Street, St Mirren Street and Gauze Street to drivers.

Council leader Derek Mackay said: "It is time to open Paisley back up to everyday
traffic. A ring road around the town centre was never going to help businesses
struggling to get by.

"I hope we can reverse damage caused by previous administrations."

The move follows a major study which was commissioned by the council's planning
and transport department into traffic patterns.

Other measures in the rescue package include introducing a separate bus lane on
Old Sneddon Street, near Paisley Gilmour Street Train Station, and the opening
up of Smithhills Street to cars in the evening.



James H
Len Scaps

Too little, too late. Paisley town centre has staggered from crisis to crisis for the last 15 years. Braehead was the final nail in it's coffin.

As an aside, I wonder if the Evening Times choose their reporters based
on their surnames?  
cybers

It has never really affected me as i have an exemption but i have seen the problems it has caused.
Paisley town centre had to be one of the most vehicle unfriendly places in the west of scotland. Now lets sit back and see how long it takes the greens to start mumping and moaning about it or try and introduce a congestion charge.
As for the free parking at the braehead... there are plans for this to be changed same with livingston under a green tax proposal.
Len Scaps

cybers wrote:
It has never really affected me as i have an exemption but i have seen the problems it has caused.
Paisley town centre had to be one of the most vehicle unfriendly places in the west of scotland. Now lets sit back and see how long it takes the greens to start mumping and moaning about it or try and introduce a congestion charge.
As for the free parking at the braehead... there are plans for this to be changed same with livingston under a green tax proposal.


The council in Paisley seem to derive a perverse pleasure from making it as hard for businesses to operate as possible. I have a friend who used to run a business near the town centre and the council came along one day and installed a cycle lane on the road outside his premises, complete with metal posts separating it from the main part of the road.

Quite why anyone would want to cycle into the centre of Paisley remains a mystery, as does the reasoning for the lane only being 30 yards long and only covering the length of my friend's premises. Although the fact that the effect of this was that no-one could park outside his business, forcing his customers to use one of the nearby (council-run) pay and display carparks might have some bearing on it.....  
cybers

Len Scaps wrote:
cybers wrote:
It has never really affected me as i have an exemption but i have seen the problems it has caused.
Paisley town centre had to be one of the most vehicle unfriendly places in the west of scotland. Now lets sit back and see how long it takes the greens to start mumping and moaning about it or try and introduce a congestion charge.
As for the free parking at the braehead... there are plans for this to be changed same with livingston under a green tax proposal.


The council in Paisley seem to derive a perverse pleasure from making it as hard for businesses to operate as possible. I have a friend who used to run a business near the town centre and the council came along one day and installed a cycle lane on the road outside his premises, complete with metal posts separating it from the main part of the road.

Quite why anyone would want to cycle into the centre of Paisley remains a mystery, as does the reasoning for the lane only being 30 yards long and only covering the length of my friend's premises. Although the fact that the effect of this was that no-one could park outside his business, forcing his customers to use one of the nearby (council-run) pay and display carparks might have some bearing on it.....  


Sounds about right as they are fantastic at the idiotic....
One council that shall remain nameless actually had workmen install these moronic steel bollards on the night shift only to find on the monday morning they could not get prisoners into the sheriff court.
Could not understand how you can decide to plant something as stupid as that without actually carrying out a site survey...
Or take notice of the HUGE sign that said no parking sheriff court use only across the entry way the muppets installed the barriers.
James

Town is set to get 4-star hotel



PLANS to create a luxury hotel, flats and offices on a riverbank in Paisley town
centre look set to be given the go-ahead today.


The £30million project will see a 139-bedroom hotel, 26 designer apartments
and 70,000sq ft of office space built next to the White Cart river.

The four-star hotel - which would be the first in the town - has been earmarked
for land close to Gilmour Street train station and will have a roof-top bar.

Builder McGarvey Construction Scotland isbehind plans to transform the vacant
site, which borders New Sneddon Street, Christie Lane, and Niddry Street.

The seven-storey complex will include a gym and conference facilities.

Councillors in Renfrewshire were to vote on the proposals today but planning
officials have already backed the project.



James H
Len Scaps

I know someone who'll be kicking himself, as he owned a bit of that site and sold it off recently for what now looks like not a lot of money    
James

Fans want rail station name for their team



FANS have got the ball rolling on a campaign to rename a train station so it
matches their football club.


St Mirren supporters want to change the name of Paisley St James
because it is the stop closest to their new stadium.

Under their proposal the stop, which lies a few hundred yards from the
ground being built on Greenhill Road, Ferguslie Park, would be called
Paisley St Mirren.

David MacDonald, 36,who runs fans' website www.blackandwhitearmy.com
said the railway station would become a "focal point" on match days.

The computer manager said: "The name of St Mirren will mean more to
the people of Paisley than St James.

"We have just started this campaign, but will be encouraging fans to write
to councillors and MSPs to ask for their support.

"The station would become a focal point for the fans of St Mirren travelling
to home games, as well as away fans on match days."

The campaign to rename the stop, which operates on the same line as
trains running from Glasgow Central and Paisley Gilmour Street, has
gained the backing of St Mirren FC and one of its former stars.



James H
Sir Roger DeLodgerley

You couldn't make it up! What next, a campaign to rename any reopened station at Ibrox as "Glasgow Rangers"?
Edward Fox

Splendid city! Inspired by the pattern on my cravat, I paid a visit to the recent Paisley gala day.

Some trifling snaps of the festivities in full flow :






And yet I say unto you that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed such as this.
HollowHorn

Nice day for it.
cheesylion

EF, you've obviously taken your pics rather early, once the gala actually STARTED the weather was fine.
James

Bumpy road in Paisley is second worst in UK

A STREET in Paisley has been named the second bumpiest in the UK in a
survey of the 10 worst roads.


A Glasgow street was sixth in a survey that put the city 181st out of 204
councils, with just 21% of roads problems fixed.

The survey rated Castle Street, Paisley, just behind a street in Leeds.

It claims the road has large stretches of surface missing, exposing older
cobblestones beneath, and complaints stretching back at least a year.

Gourock Street, off Pollokshaws Road in the South Side, is described as an
"uneven, potholed surface affecting more than half the width of the street"
with residents describing it as a "patchy repair job".

Continental Tyres carried out the poll with website FillThatHole.org.uk.

They judged the top 10 worst roads based on the time each had been in a
poor condition, how many times it had been reported to councils, potential
damage it could cause to vehicles, potential danger to road users and the
size of potholes in relation to road.



James H
HollowHorn

Canal Street Church, now Castlehead Church  was built by Paisley weavers in 1791 . Among those buried in its churchyard were the poet Robert Tannahill and the maternal great-grandparents of U.S. President Ronald Reagan. The President visited the site during a brief trip to Scotland in 1991 .










James

Ancient bridge in refit (Evening Times)



A HISTORIC bridge is to receive a £1.4million facelift.


Paisley's Abbey Bridge will be resurfaced and refurbished next year after
a study showed the 129-year-old crossing was in "very poor condition".

Contractors will spend around six months renewing steel girders,
replacing decorative panels and strengthening pavements.

It's hoped the project will be carried out in phases to ease the disruption
to traffic using the bridge, which crosses the White Cart Water and sits in
the shadow of Paisley Abbey.

Bob Darracott, Renfrewshire Council's director of planning and transport,
said: "The bridge is an essential element of the road network through
Paisley.

"Inspection of the steel girders below the carriageway revealed that, in
order to extend the life of this essential structure, measures would have
to be implemented to arrest the corrosion.

"The dilapidated cast iron parapets and fascia panels will be replaced with
identical components fabricated from a more robust iron."

Workmen will grit blast the bridge's steel support girders and apply
protective paint. A number of heavily corroded side panels have already
been removed ahead of the refurbishment.



James H
Edward Fox

Splendid news, simply splendid!

Whilst there are obviously many old Paisley relics in need of a facelift, it is greatly heartening to see the local burghers buckling down to the task at last.

Here we see the sturdy local workmen getting in a bit of ironwork restoration practice on the former Linwood car factory :





And here, the admirably inventive solution to the replacement of the former water fixture in the town square - distribution of the water.




Truly, their talents know no bounds.
HollowHorn

 
James

£4m for historic building (Evening Times)



A DEVELOPER has snapped up a historic building in the heart of Paisley in a
multi-million pound deal.


Manchester-based Jaymar Estates has bought the five-storey Grade B-listed
property in Causeyside Street for £4.3million.

Tenants have been told existing leases will continue.

The principal occupier is job creation agency Scottish Enterprise which
rents 25,000sq ft of offices on the upper floors and one of four ground
level retail units.

David Johnstone of commercial property consultants King Sturge
represented the buyers.

He said: "Our clients were attracted to this investment opportunity as it
provides good quality income secured against strong covenants.

"The building itself provides good quality office accommodation within
Paisley town centre and, significantly for a town centre building, has an
excellent car parking provision."

News of the sale comes a week after the Evening Times ran a six-part
series on how the Renfrewshire town is turning around its fortunes with
multi-million regeneration plans.

We highlighted some of the most exciting projects in the town - such as St
Mirren's new football ground and the regeneration of the town centre.



James H
James

Tesco kills Love Street store plan (Evening Times)



THE Love Street home of St Mirren is set to be sold for housing after Tesco
ditched plans to build a superstore on the site.


And the supermarket giant has confirmed the stadium will be sold to
developers if it secures permission to build a store in Renfrew Road in
Paisley.

The proposal would see a Tesco Extra built on industrial land off Wallneuk
Road.

The Buddies will sever their 114-year tie with the park in January and
move to a new stadium at Greenhill Road, as part of a £15m deal with
Tesco.

But it has shelved plans to develop Love Street and will apply for outline
planning permission for housing on the historic ground early next year.

Jennifer Duncan, Tesco corporate affairs manager, said: "Renfrew Road is
the preferred location in Paisley. The site is closer to the centre and would
help regenerate the town.

"We will be submitting two planning applications, one for the proposed
new store, and one for housing at Love Street."

Ironically, Saints had to fight to get planning permission for a
supermarket at Love Street.

The cash generated by selling the site directly for housing, thought to be
around £5million, would not have been enough to clear the club's debts
and fund the new stadium.

A series of public exhibitions about the Renfrew Road store, which could
create 600 jobs, will start tonight. Tesco officials will be on hand to answer
questions from the public at The Wynd Centre, in the town's School Wynd,
between 6pm and 9pm today, and 10am to 6pm, on Thursday and Friday.

Unless they draw a home tie in the Scottish Cup, Love Street will shut for
the final time after the SPL clash with Motherwell on January 3. Barr
Construction is entering the final phase of building work on a stadium in
Ferguslie.

It should host its first match when Kilmarnock arrive on January 31.



James H
James

Town’s £30m arts plan (Evening Times)

Plans to spark a £30million cultural revolution in Paisley were officially
unveiled today.


The proposals will see three Victorian buildings transformed into an arts
hub.

Architectural firm Page/Park has drawn up plans to turn the existing
museum and library building into a culture centre, complete with modern
exhibition space and interactive family history exhibition.

Paisley Central Library will move to a wing of the town hall, which will
have a £7m facelift.

Under the plans, first reported by The Evening Times in March, a 175-seat
theatre, suitable for performance and cinema will also be built, as well as
a new concourse and a spine linking the site to the Paisley Observatory
for the first time.

Most of the money will be raised from grants, trusts and private finance.


James H
James

Start of a new Love affair (Evening Times)



BUILDING work on St Mirren's new stadium has been completed as the club
prepares to kick off a new era.


Council chiefs are due to grant a safety certificate for the 8000-capacity
ground in Ferguslie.

Contractors Barr Construction will then hand over the keys in a fortnight's
time, pending approval from the SPL.

Police and fire chiefs have agreed to sign off the stadium in Greenhill
Road, less than half a mile from Love Street.

It will host its first match, a league clash against Kilmarnock, on January 31.

Mary Crearie, director of Renfrewshire Council's Housing and Property
Services, said: "Both Strathclyde Police and Strathclyde Fire and Rescue
are satisfied with the safety certificate."

The Saints will sever their 114-year tie with Love Street next month, as
part of a £15million deal with Tesco.

In October, the supermarket giant announced it would sell the site for
housing after ditching plans to a build a store.



James H
Alex Glass

Would have been worthwhile making a wee visit here to get some photos before they took away the stadium.
James

Alex Glass wrote:
Would have been worthwhile making a wee visit here to get some photos before they took away the stadium.

Not a bad shout. It'll still be there for a while yet.



James H
cybers

Some older stuff from around Paisley around the 1990 mark. Lots of unknown places













Fjord

HH is your man for all things Paisley he was at the laying of the foundation stone.
John

Toledo Junction, jeez cybers ye stirred some memories there  Shuttle Street mibees ?
LowLight

First one is Church Hill I think. http://flickr.com/photos/gertie_du/396800324/
James

Tesco superstore to go ahead at rundown centre  (Evening Times)



TESCO is to flatten a notorious 1960s shopping centre and replace it with a
new superstore.


Planning permission has been granted, which marks the end of a 25-year
campaign to regenerate Linwood Shopping Centre in Renfrewshire.

More than 3000 people signed a petition urging the owners to sell the concrete
plaza, which was the backdrop to the infamous lavvyheid' TV advert for
s1jobs.com Campaigners have fought for years to attract new investment
to the site, where only a handful of the 40 shops are occupied.

Residents, community representatives and elected members worked with
Tesco on the proposals to replace the complex with a superstore, health
centre, town hall and other shops.

It's thought the new development will create around 300 jobs.

In stark contrast to the fierce opposition Tesco has faced over plans for a
Tesco Town' in Glasgow's West End, its representatives received a round
of applause as they arrived at a public meeting to discuss the plan last year.

Linwood councillor Anne Hall said: "There have been developers who
have not invested in the centre over the years.

"In the 13 years I've been a councillor, I know a huge amount of council
officers' time has been spent dealing with the shopping centre.

"It's great to see the hard work put in is finally coming to fruition now."

The new Tesco store will be split 50-50 between food and non-food, following
talks with planning officials, in a bid to prevent a huge slump in trade in
Johnstone and Paisley.


James H
harky2402

My mate was saying St Mirren were looking for a name for their new ground...

She came up with a cracking suggestion.... The METHADOME      
James

The Feegiedome was another I've heard.  



James H
cybers

There was also the GYPOdome  
AlanM

cybers wrote:
There was also the GYPOdome  

that's Broadwood
Fjord

Due to reasons out with my control I spent the best part of Xmas and New Year in Paisley.... never again!
James

Group aims to halt Tesco plan (Evening Times)



A PROTEST group has been set up in an attempt to block plans to build one
of Scotland's largest Tesco superstores.


The chain, which faced more than 1000 objections to its Tesco Town plan
for Partick in Glasgow, will be challenged over its bid to build a 136,000 sq ft
store in Renfrew Road at Wallneuk, near Paisley town centre.

Stop Tesco Owning Paisley has been launched amid claims the development
would further devastate the town centre.

The group aims to attract a similar level of support as the anti-Tesco campaign
in the West End of Glasgow and will use the same initials, STOP, on posters
and leaflets.

Detailed plans for the Tesco Extra store - which would rival the company's
outlet at Silverburn, Pollok - were lodged last year after it shelved proposals
to build a store at St Mirren's former Love Street ground.


James H
Stuball

Everyone hates Tesco before they build.... but they'll all shop there once its open
James

Bye bye Love St . . . and thanks for the memories (Evening Times)



IF anybody should mourn the sad demise of Love Street then it is Tony
Fitzpatrick.


Not only did Fitz turn out in over 300 league games for St Mirren in two spells
at the club as a player, he also spent two stints in the dug-out as manager.

On top of that, he has stood on the terraces and sat in the stands, willing
his beloved Buddies to prevail, both as a young boy and as a fully-grown
man.

Yet, while Tony admits something special has been lost forever leaving the
Paisley ground after 115 years, he feels the move to Ferguslie Park is for
the best.

Gus MacPherson's men will play their first match at their new multi-million
pound stadium tomorrow - and their former captain anticipates a decidedly
bright future there.

He explains: "It is sad to be leaving Love Street after so many years there.
I have a lot of great memories of playing there over many years.

"But I think the St Mirren directors have set the club up for a number of
years with the deal they struck to sell Love Street and the new stadium
they have built. I have been along to see the new ground and it really is
looking great.

"I used to pop into Love Street from time to time. It was becoming a bit tired
and run down. "The set-up at the new stadium is far, far superior. I have no
doubt the players, and the other people who work at the club behind the scenes,
will love it.

"The dressing rooms and the training facilities in particular are excellent.
It is very modern. I think it will help them when it comes to attracting new
players to the club."

Not, of course, that a few decent footballers haven't graced the hallowed
turf at Love Street - which has started to be demolished by workmen - over
the years. Fitzpatrick, now running his own company, Kan-Do Sports, was
one of several special talents to don the black and white stripes in a halcyon
era for the Buddies.


James H
LowLight

James

£1.5M facelift for old bridge (Evening Times)



A HISTORIC Paisley bridge is to be closed for six months for a £1.5million
upgrade.


Abbey Bridge, which crosses the White Cart, was built in 1879 and can no
longer cope with the volume of traffic.

It will close on May 5 to allow the dilapidated cast iron parapet and fascia
panels, both footways and the bridge deck to be waterproofed and
movement joints replaced.

The bridge will also get a facelift with the application of anti-corrosion paint.

Marie McGurk, convener of Renfrewshire Council's environment and
infrastructure policy board, said, "The Abbey Bridge is a major part of
Paisley's road network.

"Maintaining that network is a key part of our regeneration strategy for
the town centre.

"The council has only recently completed refurbishing the Abercorn Bridge
and this gives Paisley people a great before and after view of how the
finished Abbey Bridge will look.

"We are determined this B listed building, in the heart of Paisley, should
be restored to its former glory while still being able to cope with modern
traffic volumes."

Once complete, a full set of new parapets and facia panels will be cast
and installed.

The original iron facia panels, which weight 13 tonnes, were removed in
June last year for safety reasons.

The Abbey Bridge parapets lack the movement joints built into modern
structures to allow them to expand and contract in changing temperatures.
This means the original cast iron components have buckled and fractured
over the years.

In 1993, a survey of the bridge found the 1933 era carriageways could
take 40 tonne vehicles but the footways, dating from 1879, could only
take the weight of pedestrians.

Bollards were installed as a temporary measure to protect the footways
from vehicles accidentally mounting the pavement.

Diversions will be put in place while the bridge is closed.



James H
Mahdi West

Regeneration strategy??? Is there one?   It's hard to see how much more damage the council can do to Paisley town centre, still give them their due; they're trying.
Stuball

HollowHorn



harky2402

Moody shot of the mills there Stuball.  

Good shots from the top of the tower in the Abbey Hollowhorn... been up there once, hell of a climb but well worth it in the end.  
Doog Doog

cybers wrote:
Some older stuff from around Paisley around the 1990 mark. Lots of unknown places















2nd pic: inside the museum on the high st
3rd pic: corner of gauze st and lawn st
4th pic: former canteen for the ferguslie mill ,since demolished.Now a housing development called "stable grove"
Doog Doog

Sorry,pic 4  should be titled as :
Former canteen for Ferguslie mill,since re-built as dwellings as part of a housing development called Stable Grove
James

Everybody knows that Paisley is Scotland’s biggest town. Isn’t it? Wrong, it's EK! (Evening Times)



FOR more than 200 years it has boasted the title of Scotland's largest town. But
now Paisley has lost her crown to the country's oldest New Town - East Kilbride.


Following the explosion in the textile trade in the early 19th century, Paisley
has been the town with the highest population in Scotland. But the latest figures
show East Kilbride just pips the Renfrewshire town by a margin of 27 people.

East Kilbride councillor Christopher Thomson says the accolade of Scotland's
biggest town is well-deserved. He claims the town's bright future has been luring
families to the area - boosting EK's population to 74,667 compared with Paisley's
74,640.

Mr Thomson said: "Residents are proud of what we have achieved in East Kilbride.
For a new town we have had a lot of successes but these are due to the people
who live here, who have helped attract businesses by their dedication and ability
to work hard.

"I can't confirm names at the moment, but we have several new businesses
who will be moving to the town, giving employment opportunities to local people."

With easy transport links to Glasgow, Edinburgh and England, EK, which
celebrated her 60th birthday in 2007, has attracted big-name businesses such
as Rolls Royce and Coca Cola.

And local firms are helping buck the economic trend, such as sandwich firm
Pronto Fresh who have attracted a £1million deal from supermarket chain Aldi.

It has also doubled its workforce in the last year and expanded its factory.



James H
sputnik

27 people,thats only cos they never counted the dossers .paisley wins hands down.ye cannae hiv awe they pubs for nae reason.
Fjord

I'd rather have Paisley over EK any day so much history and all that. Where's HH to sign the surrender treaty?
sputnik

HH is an exiled bankie.
James

Fall from grace (Evening Times)



ITS famous patterned cloth gave it transatlantic links and world renown. But Paisley,
a town steeped in history, is now a shadow of its former self.


A series of poor planning decisions, rival shopping centres and a full-blown
recession have left the former weaving town bruised and battered. Now, the
town centre is a mix of betting shops, pound shops and pubs - peppered with
To Let signs.

Established in 1577, Paisley developed an international reputation throughout
the 19th and early 20th century thanks to the weaving industry. The town, which
was rejected for city status in 1999 and 2001, has a rich history and important
Victorian heritage.

Paisley Abbey, it is widely accepted, was where William Wallace was schooled.
Paisley's architectural heritage boasts over 250 listed buildings while St Mirren
FC's history features Archie Gemmill and the rise to prominence of Sir Alex
Ferguson. And the local theatre group helped fine-tune the talents of Hollywood
star James McAvoy, singer Paolo Nutini and Fame Academy winner David Sneddon
for stardom.

But for some, Paisley has had its chips. Just last month one of the town's most
popular sons, Paolo Nutini, slammed his former home, saying the council has
let the area down. He said: "It used to have a cinema, a bowling alley and an
ice rink. Now these things are gone. There is nothing to do there now.

"It's bad for drink and drugs and gambling and it's got the most bookies for the
size of it in the whole of Europe. The council should be ashamed of itself."

Strathand Security in the town's Moss Street has been run by the Torrance
family for more than 20 years. Shirley Torrance says she's witnessed the sad
decline of the town centre - and claims the council just aren't doing enough
to help. The 40-year-old blames the planners and believes the problems began
with the pedestrianisation of the town centre. Officials decided on the move 10
years ago - and it has been fiercely contested ever since.

She said: "When the town centre was closed to cars footfall fell dramatically.
We're also heavily policed by traffic wardens so people leave their cars for a
few minutes to pop into a shop and then they get a ticket. Those people aren't
ever going to come back. We close now on a Saturday because there just aren't
enough people coming in to the shop.

"We also have a serious problem with rubbish and rats in the older tenement
buildings. The town is in squalor now and it's something we must deal with."

In the halycon days, Paisley could boast a high-end high street with House
of Fraser, Arnotts, Marks & Spencer, Littlewoods, Woolworths and the Co-op.
Now, M&S is the only one left and even that has turned into an outlet store.

Local specialist shops have also suffered. The greengrocers is gone, as is the
butcher and florist; the kind of shops that make each town's high street special.
The closing of town centre streets to cars also pushed shoppers away from Paisley.
And retailers say they have seen a 50% slump in trade over the last decade.

The once-bustling town centre has suffered serious decline even in the past year.
The number of empty units in the high street have risen from one in eight to one
in four - totalling 50 empty shop units. Critics say giant malls Braehead and
Silverburn damaged the small, local stores before the credit crunch struck the
final blows.

Paisley is just one of many towns facing an identity crisis in the face of new
shopping malls and edge-of-town supermarkets.



James H
Doog Doog

Paisley's decline startedbefore Braehead opened a door.The pedestrianisation of the High st and Gilmour st and subsequent parking restrictions are to blame.
The scheme was the brainchild of Richard Manser,the then roads chief with the council.The fact that he never held a driving licence says it all.
What doesn't help is that the town has lost a lot of its big employers,people with no money to spend apart from the essentials.
James

Paisley may be down... but it’s not out (Evening Times)



FOR centuries Paisley Abbey has looked out over the historic town. From the
schoolhouse of William Wallace to the place of worship for generations of weavers,
the Abbey has formed the heart of Paisley.


But around the famous landmark, the town has suffered a staggering decline
with neighbouring buildings run down and ragged. A double whammy of rival
shopping malls and the credit crunch have hit the town hard.

And traders say the decision to pedestrianise the town centre 10 years ago
has driven shoppers away. Now, a new generation of Buddies is wondering what
next for the town.

Bob Darracott, director of planning and transport for Renfrewshire, has high
hopes but he admits turning Paisley back into a thriving, successful hub will take
a lot of work - and cash. A grant from the lottery backed Townscape Heritage
Initiative has brought in £1.5million to revamp the historic area of the town.

The money is earmarked for restoring the derelict fire station in Gordon Street.
It is also to be used to restore the tenements and shopfronts in the Cross/Oakshaw
conservation area. Paisley is also set to benefit from part of a £92m boost to
upgrade schools and leisure facilities across Renfrewshire, and is to be given
£7.1m by Renfrewshire Council to develop the Lagoon Leisure Centre into a
state-of-the-art community sports hub with gym, swimming pool, spa and steam
room.

Bosses also plan to offer climbing walls, skateboard parks and mountain bike
equipment. Extra investment is set to come from Reid Kerr College, which is
turning the YMCA building into a drama studio and negotiations are under way
with housing developers to build on several town centre sites.

Westpoint Homes has plans to create 40 high-quality flats in the heart of the town,
on a 2.8-acre site - around Cotton Street, Gauze Street and Mill Street - that
housed the former council headquarters.

The former Arnott site is one of the largest derelict areas in Paisley and a symbol
of the failing town centre, but there are now plans to build a mixed-use
development including flats, a care home for the elderly and extra parking.

Mr Darracott said: "Paisley has a lot to be proud of and we really need to market
it in a way that lets people know the positives. It has been hit hard by out of
town developments and the economic situation but it is a historic place with
many fantastic old buildings. It's going to take a lot to restore Paisley but we're
working extremely hard to do so."

Council bosses are also working to make the town centre safer and more accessible.



James H
Doog Doog

I heard today that the sandstone tenements is Sutherland St. are to be demolished,no date as yet.
James

Bus bedlam in Paisley (Evening Times)



PAISLEY town centre is still in the grip of bus chaos two years after the authorities
vowed to sort it out.


Bus passengers and drivers say not enough is being done to free up streets
in and around the town centre which are clogged with dozens of buses - even
outwith rush hours. The chaos which unites the travelling public and it came to
light when the Evening Times took to local streets to find out just how the situation
had improved.

Some residents want to see a new bus terminal while others pointed the finger
of blame at a pedestrianisation scheme which restricts traffic movements. The
Evening Times went back to Paisley two years after bus inspectors were brought
in to bring to an end the town's so-called bus wars when rivals gridlocked streets
and blocked bus bays in a deliberate attempt to pinch passengers by preventing
other operators from picking up.

The authorities have cracked down hard but the paying public reckons more can
be done. The main problems are in Gauze Street, St Mirren Brae and New Street as
the buses which include single and double deckers, bendy buses and small
independent operator buses vie for space at the bus stops - often blocked the
road for other users.

The existing bus terminus under the Piaza Shopping Centre was last week named
one of the worst polluted places in Scotland and continues to be a bug bear to
the travelling public.



James H
Doog Doog

I'd ban the bendy buses. They're ok for the streets of post-war German cities,but are a pain in the arse on the 19th century designed streets of Scotland.
The trouble with building a bus station is that there is no land close enough to be any use.
cybers

Creeping about at Stupid O'Clock


wee minx

Aww..lovely crisp, clear shots there Cybers, that's it...I need to get out in the dark
HeligonPish

Paisley is a beauiful wee town. You just have to look above the normal 'head down no lookie in th'eye' guff.
The history is fascinating incs The Abbey, Robert The Bruce and The Wallace
what more do you need?!
Alex Glass

 to Urban Glasgow Heli
Doog Doog

Millarston maisonettes not long for this world





In this pic,the middle block has only one close occupied.


This was where Millarston,Woodneuk and West Courts once stood.
John

Nice one doogs, I`m away to get my prayer mat out and pray I don`t get sent there  
Doog Doog

Scary wrote:
Nice one doogs, I`m away to get my prayer mat out and pray I don`t get sent there  


We can't wait til it gets flattened.Its a dismal place thats always windy and cold even on a hot summers day,our least favourite place to work!
wee minx

It looks like a good place to take photies though  
Doog Doog

Old Paisley tram depot

The same day as I took the Ferguslie station site pics,I remembered about the tram depot that sat adjacent to the station and had closed in 1957.
Although its long-since demolished,there are the odd remnants that something was there.Here are the pics:

General view of the site.


Remains of a wall.


Piece of tram rail turnout.


One of the guys nearly fell into this.Reckon it was once an inspection pit.








Mahdi West

wee minx wrote:
It looks like a good place to take photies though  


The demolition boys were getting stuck in to the Millarston maisonettes when I passed by on the train this morning.
Doog Doog

Managed these yesterday.Just wish I was there Tues or wed.








.....And a couple of views:





Mahdi West

Methodist Central Hall


Arnott's - still there


Well, well


Abbey Bridge - nice paint job


Abbey Bridge
Doog Doog

Great photos,Mahdi.
The bridge looks cracking.
Mahdi West

Thanks Doog Doog. They've done what looks like a smashing job on it.

Here's a photo from platform 1 at Gilmour Street of what I assume is the church hall for the Episcopal church although I'm wondering if the part beside the red container could be the manse as it looks like living accommodation. In any case you can't go wrong with the court. Beautiful building.
Doog Doog

Yes that is the Episcopal church,though I think that bit at the container is possibly an extension.
James

First sight of £51m store (Evening Times)



These are the first images of a proposed new Tesco Extra superstore planned
for Paisley.


The artist’s impression shows what will emerge if Britain’s biggest supermarket
chain gets the go-ahead to revamp a derelict 12 acre site at Wallneuk.

The store will create 600 new jobs – 400 permanent and the rest part-time – and
today Tesco bosses got the green light from union leaders who represent shop
workers when they came out in support of the planned £51 million development.

The planning application for the Renfrew Road site, which lies close to the town
centre, will go before Renfrewshire Council in February.

Usdaw divisional officer Lawrence Wason has written to council chiefs, saying:
“Usdaw would welcome Tesco’s commitment to invest in Paisley and the creation
of 600 much-needed jobs.

“Usdaw would urge the council to consider the application positively so that the
area can benefit from the opportunities that it would provide.”

The supermarket giant welcomes the support of Usdaw, with corporate affairs
manager Jennifer Duncan commenting: “With one of Britain’s largest trade unions
commending the Wallneuk proposal to councillors, it shows the importance of
the jobs we will provide in Renfrewshire.

“We will work with the local authority, employment agencies and JobCentre
Plus to guarantee that half the 600 jobs will go to people who have been jobless
long-term.”

The Wallneuk site is a former lorry park which also housed a petrol station and
a 10-pin bowling alley. It’s now the preferred option for Tesco which had been granted
planning permission for a new store at Love Street after the supermarket bought
the home ground of local football team St Mirren.

The £15m deal enabled the SPL club to clear its debts and build a new stadium at
Greenhill Road elsewhere in Paisley. Tesco now wants to transfer the planning
permission from the stadium site to Wallneuk so that it can sell on Love Street
for housing.

Planning consultants hired by the supermarket chain claim the new 136 sq ft store,
with parking for more than 700 vehicles, will attract tens of thousands of new
shoppers into Paisley and help regenerate the once prosperous town. The store
would also pump millions of pounds into the local economy via staff wages.

But local shopkeepers fear they could be put out of business and one protest
group has claimed planning approval will turn the centre of Paisley into a “ghost town.”



James H
Mahdi West

Former Ferguslie Half-Timer's School. Amazingly still hanging in.



Stuball

I had to fix the gates on that place a few times... I worked for the company that owned it.
Mahdi West

Aye, there was a sturdy looking padlock on the gate yesterday.
Doog Doog

good pics,Mahdi  
Mahdi West

I finally found a use for that eye sore of a multi-story car park. Smashing views of the square and railway line. I've tried to upload the viaduct heading eastwards but I've been getting knocked back.

County Square


Gilmour Street Station
Doog Doog

Old street name


Former T A drill hall


Coats memorial church from George St.


Broomlands St. looking to town centre
hillmanimp

Doog Doog wrote:

Broomlands St. looking to town centre


Doog

I remember visiting the observatory in the mid sixties on a school trip.  It was in the evening, but unfortunately it was cloudy so we didn't get to see through the telescope  The rest of the trip was fab

Imp
Doog Doog

Imp, thats the former John Neilson school in that pic. Used to go up to the observatory on a monday night,when I was younger until I started working.
hillmanimp

Doog Doog wrote:
Imp, thats the former John Neilson school in that pic. Used to go up to the observatory on a monday night,when I was younger until I started working.


Doog

I am from Glasgow and don't know Paisley.  We came to Paisley on a train from St Enoch's in the days when it was still operational.

I can't remember very much about the trip to the observatory, apart from the orrery, and the fact that we weren't able to look through the telescope.

When you used to go, were there any clear nights that you had a good view?   Do you know if the observatory is still open?

Imp
Doog Doog

hillmanimp wrote:
Doog

I am from Glasgow and don't know Paisley.  We came to Paisley on a train from St Enoch's in the days when it was still operational.

I can't remember very much about the trip to the observatory, apart from the orrery, and the fact that we weren't able to look through the telescope.

When you used to go, were there any clear nights that you had a good view?   Do you know if the observatory is still open?

Imp


There were quite a few good nights,where you got to look at stuff the whole time you were there,but often there'd be cloud moving in so may only get between 30 mins or an hour.
I'm sure it is still open but at what times and days I don't know.
Doog Doog

Here you go:

http://www.paisley.org.uk/attractions/observatory.php
hillmanimp

Doog Doog wrote:
Here you go:

http://www.paisley.org.uk/attractions/observatory.php


Thanks Doog.

Next time I'm around I will try and go.

Imp
Mahdi West

Smashing photo of the old Drill Hall, Doog Doog. Any idea if they're going to do anything with it. and who owns this now? I'd've thought it would be ideal for university accommodation. It's a shame that it's boarded up.
wee minx

Yip,, real shame it's boarded up , could have been a right good place to explore too
Stuball

wee minx wrote:
Yip,, real shame it's boarded up , could have been a right good place to explore too


Had a wee look round the outside last year... sealed up pretty good too
cell

I’ve an interest in the history of electricity generation and power stations in Scotland and I’m looking for some help from any of you Paisley Buddies. The RCAHMS site has three references for power stations in Paisley, the original corporation one, which I believe is still standing, was at Blackhall street, grid ref NS 4897 6337, this was opened in 1899 and closed in 1930. This was replaced with a new station opened in 1923 at Ferguslie (it might have been called Ferguslie Mills) which was closed in 1957, RCAHMS doesn’t seem to list this one, it does have a reference to a “central power station at Ferguslie Thread Works” grid ref  NS 46725 63234. It also has a reference to a power station at the “Seedhill Finishing Works”  grid ref NS 4925 6357. Both of these seem to be associated with industrial works and not a big public supply, therefore if any can give me a location, grid ref, any details or even a photograph I would be most grateful.
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