Archive for urbanglasgow.co.uk For information past, present & future on the city of Glasgow, Scotland, UK
 


       urbanglasgow.co.uk Forum Index -> Other Photography
Doorstop

Photography Questions.

I couldn't see another thread on a generalised topic like this and I had a specific question to ask so here we go ...

I've recently acquired a half decent camera (Lumix DMC FZ18) and am in the process of tinkering with it with the general aim of finding out about aperture thingies, shutter settings, f-stops and all that interminable jargon but it's still all pretty murky to me.

I was taking photos last night and found that in certain conditions (indoors under incandescent light) my photos aren't as sharp as I'd like them to be .. they have lots of colour bleed, the focus isn't as defined as in full light and there's a lot of noise in the image.

For instance ...


I was just wondering if any kind UGer could enlighten me as to the proper settings to use to clean my images up or, alternatively, point me in the direction of a tutorial or three?
Unh@ppyb@st@rd

in low light condition you need to open lens right up f2.8 i think for lumix. great if subject static with just enough light. If subject moves slightly shot will be blurred so you increase Iso to freeze motion ( iso 800 or 1600 not uncommon in low light situations but this will also increase noise. A tripod will be need if subject is static or flash to illuminate subject. hope that gives u rough explanation.  
Doorstop

That's brilliant UB ... y'see, this is the stuff I'm desperate to learn.

Fantastic .. cheers again.  
AlanM

Your camera also has image stabilisation, which will help by allowing you to hand hold shots at much slower shutter speeds than without - it won't help with moving subjects though.
LowLight

Some pics and links.

Aperture


Things to remember about aperture.

The lower f/ number the larger the aperture. The lower the f/ number the more light will enter the lens.
Aperture size affects Depth Of Field





ISO

Things to remember about ISO - This all just depends on your available light

ISO 100/200 is fine for sunny days but will require a slower shutter speed and/or larger aperture f/1.8 f/2.8 in darker situations etc.

ISO 400/800/1600 will allow for a faster shutter speed but will result in more noise being generated.
ISO noise



Shutter Speed

Things to remember about shutter speed.

A slow shutter speed 30 seconds to 1/60 sec will result in a blurry image, milky water, trails from moving cars etc.
A faster shutter speed 1/200 sec to 1/4000 sec will freeze the subject. Good for sports or wildlife photography.



That's just a short explanation of exposure and doesn't take into †account the use of a tripod (get one) a flash or conditions that are out of your control †

So:

Larger aperture (smaller number) - More light in, affects Depth Of Field (read up on that a wee bit and practice with it).

ISO Speed - Lower number = less noise but requires slower shutter speed depending on lighting conditions.

Shutter Speed - Low shutter speed will blur anything moving or create a nice smooth water look etc.

Faster shutter speed will freeze any action, ideal for fast paced sport or wildlife.

Just remember these aren't rules just some guidelines. Get out and get shooting and don't get too caught up in all the technical stuff.

I'll also revise this post later because it's a bit rushed.

NEXT TIME

DEPTH OF FIELD
RAW
WHITE BALANCE
LowLight

Oh and if you go to my flick page or look at my images posted here you'll notice the settings are around the border.

I'm not saying they're all perfect settings (no such thing) but they might show you how a large aperture will create a shallower depth of field (blurry background) or how a fast shutter speed will capture a bird in flight or freeze people in mid step walking down the street.

Just get out shooting and get the results posted.
HollowHorn

Re: Photography Questions.

Doorstop wrote:



Poor buggers, they just know that they are going to have to look at the results as well. †
AlanM

LowLight wrote:
ISO Speed - Lower number = less noise but requires faster shutter speed depending on lighting conditions.


Lower ISO needs a slower shutter speed not a faster speed.
LowLight

Fixed.
Doorstop

Very helpful Gentlemen ... between this and 'The Other Place' I have learned loads over last night and this morning.

Cheers muchly ... and rest assured I will be back bothering you again ... soon.    
cybers

Can it ever be classed as bother if you ask for help and someone else decides to impart their knowledge.
Noo hurry up and get snapping till wee see the results with your new shiny shiny  
rotten milk

the best thing i realised when learning about photography, was that things (aperture, shutter speed, ISO) work in halfs and doubles.(very simplified, i know)

but it means (roughly) if you have a setting of aperture,speed,ISO if you keep one thing constant(say ISO as it's the film in the camera), then if you increase one of the others, you decrease the other variable by the same amount

exposure goes up in 'stops' : f1.8, 2, 2.8, 4, 5.6 - in each case one 'stop' has 1/2 the light getting than the previous one, so you need to increase the shutter speed to compensate

shutter speed goes 1s, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125 etc. each step lets 1/2 the amount of light in

now, for any given 'exposure' if you increase the f number, you decrease the shutter speed by the same amount of steps
e.g. f4 @ 1/60s = f2.8 @ 1/30
      f8@ 1/500 = f5.6 @ 1/1000 or f11 @ 1/250

of course these exposures may be 'equivalent', but different effects come in to play - low f number has less depth of field (stuff in sharp focus) than high f number
slow shutter speeds have greater risk of blurring than fast shutter speeds

it's easier to do than it is to write i assure you!

of course this refers more to film cameras, as a manual SLR meant you had to set it, well manually
obviously with modern digital there are so many things you can do, but i think if you thought in manual SLR terms, it would give you a good 'first principles' understanding of exposure, DOF, etc.
Fjord

35mm

Great post mate and it highlights the fundamentals of photography in this day and age of point and shoot digital cameras.

I'd urge everybody to try a manual 35mm film camera at least once before they die... trust me you'll love it.  
LowLight

Re: 35mm

Fjord wrote:
Great post mate and it highlights the fundamentals of photography in this day and age of point and shoot digital cameras.

I'd urge everybody to try a manual 35mm film camera at least once before they die... trust me you'll love it. †


I love using my Canon AE-1. Lightmeter doesn't work and it's basically in bad nick but it's still great to use.
hillmanimp

Doorstop

I hope you don't mind that I use this thread of your's to ask a technical question!



(If you do it's too late )

I bought a set of 35mm slides of the Grand Canyon when I visited many years ago.  The colours have changed and the now have a strong pink hue.

I am new to the scanning and photo manipulation game and wonder if anyone give me hints on how to remove (if possible) the colour cast to make the slides reasonable again?

I have Photoshop Elements (need to check the version).

I don't mind posting them up as they are if anyone would like the challenge themselves!  Just let me know the best file type and resolution, and where I should post them.

Many thanks in advance.

Imp
cybers

Whilst not knowing the layout of elements ( i have it on my laptop too)
It should be a case of just removing the colour cast though this will have an effect on the sky if it started life as a sunset pic.
Why not post up one or two that we can play with or links to higher resolutions and i am sure members will have a little dabble in the black art.

It would also help us to sharpen our skills whilst providing you with a more concise answer.

..............................................

Don't know how i never came across this topic before and rotten milk made good on his explanation of Reciprocity Law
Exposure ∝ Aperture ◊ Exposure ◊ Luminance

Whilst a pretty foolproof method you do need to bracket shots as the exposure time gets higher to compensate for the fall off.
hillmanimp

cybers wrote:
Whilst not knowing the layout of elements ( i have it on my laptop too)
It should be a case of just removing the colour cast though this will have an effect on the sky if it started life as a sunset pic.
Why not post up one or two that we can play with or links to higher resolutions and i am sure members will have a little dabble in the black art.

It would also help us to sharpen our skills whilst providing you with a more concise answer.



Cheers Cybers


I'll post up a couple this evening when I get home.   What is the maximum file size of an attachment that I can post so that it guides me for the resolution?

Imp
cybers

Cant add attachments to the site m8 but use photobucket or flickr and all shall be well ...
1024 i think is the largest size courtesy allows.
LowLight

Aye get them posted so we can have a go.
hillmanimp

In a couple of minutes I am going to start a thread in photography specifically for this.

Imp
Lone Groover

A little photoshop question.

I want to alter a picture so it looks more like a slide viewed with a back light.

Any suggestions ?

cheeeeeeeers !
Fjord

Hmm interesting idea Groover have you tried just viewing the pic on a black background

I'd also boost up the saturation a notch.
cybers

Done this with a few scans of Slides for someone.

Get your image dimensions and then add 10-15 %
make a new image and input these as you dimensions and colour it black as Fjord said.
Then copy and paste the original as a layer.
Adjust exposure and gamma till you are happy with the result
and then adjust hue and saturation as the colours in lightboxes are generally sharp.
Then just select unsharp mask to add some sharpness something like

Amount 75%
Radius † 4.0
Threshold 0

is a good place to start. there are other tweaks in photoshop but they are mostly down to personal taste.
Hope you enjoy doing them as i certainly did when i was.
Lone Groover

Cheers Fjord 'nCybers.

I had a quick try on that and it does have a pleasing effect.

Next day I am housebound I will have a more comprehensive dabble - and post some before & after stuff.  
Jock58

Canon EOS 500N Camera kit

Sorry don't know the etiquette for this type of question I hope its not out of line asking here

I just came into possession of this kit it contains
Canon EOS 500N Camera kit with
EF-28-80mm II Lens
EF-80-200mm   Lens
There is also a 100-300mm  Sigma zoom lens.
The lot seems to be in very good condition.
I know nothing about cameras you need to put the wee roll of film in so can anyone tell me is this any equipment any good ?
And as its wasted on me is there any re-sale value to this ? I'm not looking to sell but its a handy thing to know.
Jock58
LowLight

That's a good film camera you've got there and some fine lenses. Get a battery and a roll of film in it and start shooting.

Resale value isn't great but it's a nice wee analogue setup.
wee minx

Also try and make every shot count, it can be expensive if you are not careful. I'll tell you this though... ....film is probably one of the best ways to learn about photography, it really makes you slow down and think.
cybers

And if the need takes you Jock you can get a nice wee digital body for those lenses for not a whole lot of cash.
Jock58

cybers wrote:
And if the need takes you Jock you can get a nice wee digital body for those lenses for not a whole lot of cash.


Thanks for the replies.
I don't think i would have the patience or the aptitude to use film but the digital idea appeals to me. I will look into that me thinks

Jock58
LowLight

Jock58 wrote:
cybers wrote:
And if the need takes you Jock you can get a nice wee digital body for those lenses for not a whole lot of cash.


Thanks for the replies.
I don't think i would have the patience or the aptitude to use film but the digital idea appeals to me. I will look into that me thinks

Jock58


If you're selling the camera give me a shout.  
Jock58

Jock58 wrote:
cybers wrote:
And if the need takes you Jock you can get a nice wee digital body for those lenses for not a whole lot of cash.


Thanks for the replies.
I don't think i would have the patience or the aptitude to use film but the digital idea appeals to me. I will look into that me thinks

Jock58


That being said if anyone has an idea of value please could you PM me.
They were left to my wife & her brothers.
I would like to keep them as no one else is interested, but i need an idea to give back a fair price to the others.

Jock58
AlanM

Asda do cheap film processing and will put the pics on a CD for you - makes it cheaper if you ask for no prints.

have a search on ebay and tick the completed listings box for an idea of selling price for them
Stuball

Made this a sticky topic within the photography forum as I think it may come in handy for people wishing to ask for photography assistance
cybers

Came across this excellent wee Ebook ... Thought i would share it with the members who like this sort of thing...
Loads of cracking tips to bring out the best in your images.

The Power-Retouche Cookbook For Digital Photographers
fastnet

Not really a photography question but when people post pics of panoramas and there is a bit underneath saying click here for super size etc.

How do you do that ?

Obviously i know you have to put the pic on a image hosting site and post the link.

But where do you host it and how do you change the link to "click here for super size" ?

Cheers in advance.
Doorstop

cybers wrote:
Came across this excellent wee Ebook ... Thought i would share it with the members who like this sort of thing...
Loads of cracking tips to bring out the best in your images.

The Power-Retouche Cookbook For Digital Photographers


Well played .. duly added to the arsenal.

ARSENAL!!

*sorry, I couldn't resist the Eric Morecambe moment just then*
Stuball

fastnet wrote:
Not really a photography question but when people post pics of panoramas and there is a bit underneath saying click here for super size etc.

How do you do that ?

Obviously i know you have to put the pic on a image hosting site and post the link.

But where do you host it and how do you change the link to "click here for super size" ?

Cheers in advance.


You need to start by point it to an URL for the large image. Click on URL above and change it to say URL=super size image url then click img and post the url for the small image... close img tag then url tag. It should look something like

Code:
[url=sillysize][img]small size[/img][/url]
fastnet

Cheers stu.
fastnet

OK..................I'm thick....

The bit in some peoples sigs saying My Flickr.

How do i change it to that from my flickr link ?
cybers

similar to what stu said ... [url=your flickr link]missing out the [img] tags and put somthing like MY FLICKR[url/]
LowLight

Use flickr logo from http://img55.imageshack.us/img55/6380/flickrlogogammagifv5989ep9.gif or use one of your own.

Go to profile>signature>Input code below

Remember to change the code to your name after www.flickr.com/

Code:
[url=www.flickr.com/yournamehere][img]http://img55.imageshack.us/img55/6380/flickrlogogammagifv5989ep9.gif[/img][/url]
fastnet

Cheers mate....
LowLight

No probs. I meant to type use flickr logo and not download.
fastnet

LowLight wrote:
No probs. I meant to type use flickr logo and not download.


fastnet

See if it works.

Can't get it with my name but just copied the address and it seems to have worked.

Cheers again.
LowLight

Works a treat.
Syntexis

Don't forget WHITE BALANCE.
indoor lights, the ones with filiments at least, tend to give a yellow cast to pictures, if your camera is set for 'outdoors'.
Daylight has a natural bluish tint to it.
The opposite effect happens when the camera is set for indoor lighting, and the pictures are taken outside.
Your landscape will then look noticably blue.
This is an effect of COLOUR TEMPERATURE, and white balance seeks to adjust this.
Cameras usually have an AUTO white balance in the menu, but it can also be set manually, by holding a white card to the lens and performing the white balance operation.
If you are indoors, the card will have a yellow cast, and the camera will 'skew' all its settings so that this colour cast now appears white, and the opposite happens for outdoors.
Hope this helps;
Ian
Stuball

fastnet wrote:
See if it works.

Can't get it with my name but just copied the address and it seems to have worked.

Cheers again.


You know... I did'nt know you had a flickr account
fastnet

Stuball wrote:
fastnet wrote:
See if it works.

Can't get it with my name but just copied the address and it seems to have worked.

Cheers again.


You know... I did'nt know you had a flickr account


I only had the basic account until last week Stu.

Decided to upgrade and store some pics on there.
Stuball

It's a good choice... gives the chance to network a bit and get feedback
fastnet

Right.........A photography question.

I was messing about trying different iso settings last night but when i uploaded the pics i got these reflections.

Is it something as simple as having a filter on the lens ? (I forgot to take it off )



Stuball

Were they taken through a window?
fastnet

No they weren't stu.
Stuball

What kind of filter was it? It's possible that it's caused some 'total internal reflection'
fastnet

It was a uv filter.
womble

[quote="fastnet"]Right.........A photography question.

I was messing about trying different iso settings last night but when i uploaded the pics i got these reflections.

Is it something as simple as having a filter on the lens ? (I forgot to take it off )



I know that the reflection was by accident/mistake but I think the purple "moon" looks realy futuristic
LowLight

Guy with same problem here.
http://forums.thinkbroadband.com/...x/3541285-reflection-problem.html
Stuball

Just a bit of TIR between the lens glass and the UV filter... if you shoot in raw, you could have cloned it out
cybers

I get that on my Uv filter but if i swap it out to a polariser its fine  
Though i prefer night shots with no filters i still use my hood... It keeps my ears warm.
Stuball

Lens hood at night can prevent stray street lights showing up on long exposures
AlanM

Yeah, its a reflection on your filter - your best to only use filters when you actually need them.

The protection argument doesn't hold water unless your shooting near sea spray or in a dust storm. Lens caps and hoods provide protection, filters are to alter the quantity or quality of light entering the lens.

NEVER store a lens with a filter attached -  it doesn't take much of a knock to shatter a filter and then you've got thousands of pieces of glass between the front element and the lens cap
LowLight

So is it because those parts are over exposed that they've reflected off the filter in the first place?

Liking the way the motorway reflection is both upside down and back to front.
fastnet

Thanks guys.

When i started this not so long ago i remember reading that you should always have a filter on your lens so that if you got a scratch it would be easier to replace the filter.

Got me thinking differently now......
AlanM

It makes me laugh that folk will spend several hundred pounds on a lens and the first thing they do is stick a £5 filter on the front of it
Stuball

The UV filter CAN be handy protection in certain circumstances but is not suited to night/dark photography due to this reflection issue.
Beano

I have a Finepix s8100fd "bridge camera" and have noticed blue tinge in bright sunlight. Now the question is I bought a filter kit from e bay (awaiting Delivery) will this help or have I wasted money.

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/FILTER-KIT-...tDomain_0&hash=item3357153d1c
LowLight

Post up some examples.
AlanM

That is chromatic aberation also refered to as purple fringing. It occurs in high contrast situations as the blue and red ends of the spectrum are bent by different amounts.

It can be fixed after the event in software or avoided by stopping down a bit more or avoiding it altogether by not shooting into the light
AlanM

Of those filters I'd say that the Circular polariser is the most useful of the lot, it won't help with CA (may even make it worse) but it will improve the colours you get in the sky and from plants and can remove unwanted reflections. Strongest effect is at right angles to your light source
Beano

Thanks Alan,.. found this review on the camera looks like your spot on mate.
I am a happy owner of a Fuji S5000 getting many compliments about my photos, I needed a new camera for a special function so went for another Fuji. The S8100fd, it arrived on a bright sunny day so I took many photos I was disappointed with the results and had to adjust the picture quality with software, I also noticed a purple band in the viewfinder. I advised Amazon (who were and are great), but I did not want to give up in case it was me. I emailed Fuji, searched their forum, eventually I had to send it back to Amazon for a replacement, hoping it was a one off. My new one arrive promptly but again this one has the purple banding and poor photos in bright sun light. So now I am looking for another camera, Fuji have accepted they have a design fault so check out their forum before buying.
Spitfire

In awe of some of Cybers HDR shots I'd like to give it a try. Can anyone point me in the direction of a good tutorial for beginners to digital manipulation and in particular HDR or better still maybe Cybers could show us how it's done.  
Lone Groover

Spitfire wrote:
In awe of some of Cybers HDR shots I'd like to give it a try. Can anyone point me in the direction of a good tutorial for beginners to digital manipulation and in particular HDR or better still maybe Cybers could show us how it's done. †



Hi Spitfire,
If you look through the HDR section, you will see a lot of answers his Cyrbership has given to us mere mortals.
Spitfire

Thanks. Will do. I guess I should have tried that first.
Doorstop

Cybers is indeed the absolute bollocks at this .. follow his ministerings and you shan't go far wrong.
AlanM

I'm in the process of setting up an online camera club - website with tutorials, hints and tips etc. along with a forum

I'll post details shortly when I've got the look and feel right.

Hopefully you'll all also come and post on there.
cybers

Sounds good Alan mind and Ping up the details when you get it going ....

Beano

Alan looking foward to seeing your website mate, I think it's a great idea.
Doorstop

Affirmative.

That sounds proper dandy, does that.
Chris61

I'd join up too. Sounds like a good idea pal  
Alex Glass

Brilliant Alan

I will sign up I need all the help I can get.

   
AlanM

Got a few wee niggles to sort out, mostly IE related. Then it'll be good to go
AlanM

Sorted out the niggles and the forum is good to go and can be found at UK Photo Club.

There will be a site to follow with articles and tutorials.

Register and get stuck in
Chris61

signed up to the forum  
Beano

Alan.....signed up mate    
Alex Glass

That is me signed up too.  
Doorstop

Done
AlanM

cheers guys - Alex, did you get lost on the way, can't see you there
AlanM

New site is coming along nicely. We could still do with some more members though.
Chris61

What's the best way to clean dust off the internal camera viewfinder (mirror thingy) not the sensor itself ?!

Any good tips ?
cybers

Jessops Giotto Rocket £6.99

Brilliant for blowing the mirror clean though it sometimes knocks the dust onto the sensor so i generally leave the mirror well alone till it really needs it.
Chris61

cybers wrote:
Jessops Giotto Rocket £6.99

Brilliant for blowing the mirror clean though it sometimes knocks the dust onto the sensor so i generally leave the mirror well alone till it really needs it.


ok, thanks for the tip Cybers  
AlanM

Dust on the mirror or in the viewfinder won't affect image quality, unless you have one of the new fangled Sony SLT cameras, and then you don't have to worry about sensor dust as the sensor never gets exposed to the elements.

A quick blast with the rocket blower will do the trick - don't wipe it with a lens cloth or tissue as even the smallest pressure on the mirror could misalign it and affect your ability to focus.
Beano

I have tried a few shots in RAW then put it through the software provided with the camera,done a few adjustments but what now ? do I then save the photo into JEPG! (if that's possible ) or is RAW only for Adobe Photoshop (sorry wee bit confused by this)  
cybers

I use raw rather than jpeg in camera as it has the same effect as shooting to film more or less ... bypass your camera software and just load straight to photoshop ...
you are then able to fine tune your photo by dodge burn and general monkeying then its up to yourself if you save the result as jpeg tiff bitmap etc ...
Chris61

AlanM wrote:
Dust on the mirror or in the viewfinder won't affect image quality, unless you have one of the new fangled Sony SLT cameras, and then you don't have to worry about sensor dust as the sensor never gets exposed to the elements.

A quick blast with the rocket blower will do the trick - don't wipe it with a lens cloth or tissue as even the smallest pressure on the mirror could misalign it and affect your ability to focus.


No just the viewfinder, but bloody annoying ! Ill procure a rocket blaster from somewhere !

womble

Chris61 wrote:

No just the viewfinder, but bloody annoying ! Ill procure a rocket blaster from somewhere !



Have a super hot curry, that should give you a great rocket blaster mate        
Jock58

Hi all

Got an annoying little dot appearing on my photos †top middle.
Its not the lens as i have changed them and it still appears.
I'm a bit wary of cleaning inside the camera. Any tips on how to get rid of this.
Camera is Canon 1000D



Jock58
LowLight

It's dust/dirt on your sensor Jock. You could clean the sensor or live with it and remove it in Photoshop using the clone or patch tool.

Usually the dust will only show up when using a very small aperture. If you shot that sky at f/1.8 you'd probably never see the dust but then you would very rarely want to shoot the sky with that large an aperture.

I usually see the dust appear with anything smaller than f/11 f/16 etc.

Remember when changing lenses do it as fast as possible so as not to let any sh!t get into it.
cybers

Make sure that your auto sensor cleaner is turned on in the menu option it should cure it as its sensor dust ... if that does not remedy the problem i suggest a giotto Rocket air blower .. 7 quid from jessops ... Dont cut corners and buy compressed air this would add to your problem enter manual cleaning mode which will lock your mirror up and give it a few squeezes though be careful you dont actually want to touch the sensor ... Failing that proper sensor clean if your not feeling adventurous is 30 quid though i am sure canon do your first one free so usually a good idea to save that till it gets much worse
Jock58

Thanks guys.

The cleaner is on as i see the logo when i turn the camera off.
I will look into that  rocket.
Its not a major prob but i thought I would ask for some advice in case it was and could get worse.

Jock58

       urbanglasgow.co.uk Forum Index -> Other Photography Page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2
Create your own free forum | Buy a domain to use with your forum
The early bird catches the worm (proverb) | The second mouse gets the cheese (fact)