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Alex Glass

Ruchazie and the Surrounding Areas

I was going to post this in the Ruchazie thread that is in the Glasgow From The Past section but although this batch of photos I am going to post are certainly from the past I hope that this thread will get more attention here in Urban Adventures & Exploration similar to the Nitshill Threads.

Firstly a couple of people to thank. This first batch of photos are posted with the kind permission of John Macdonald former resident of Avondale Street, Ruchazie and now living in America.

The photos were tracked down by one of our new members on here Ruchazie Rat and without his efforts we wouldn't be seeing this photos here.

Before I start posting photos I would like to just give a little of my association with Ruchazie.

My family moved to Ruchazie in 1967 as part of the slum clearances in Cowcaddens. I spent the second half of my childhood growing up in here. When we moved in to our house on Gartcraig Road we thought we were moving out to the countryside. We lived on the banks of a canal where we seen barges going up and down the water on a regular basis. There was a golf course at the top of our street and loads of open space including  about 20 red blaze football pitches. Across the canal from our house was Barlinnie Prison.

Our summer holidays from school where a real fun packed adventure. There was lots to do and see including short trips to Hogganfield Loch where we could take a tri on the boat or find loads of other things to explore and do.

Hopefully these photos will jog a few memories for people who also grew up in Ruchazie. But lets not restrict it to just Ruchazie there are lots of placed in the surrounding area and there are also some photos of these placed in John's collection.

Hope you enjoy them as much as I did when I first seen them.

Avondale Street looking out to the Pitches

Avondale Street looking out to the Pitches

Avondale Street looking out to the Pitches 2

Houses replaced the pitches

Avondale Street looking out to the new houses

Avondale Street looking out to Gartcraig Road

Looking over the back of Avondale Street toward Claypots

Across the Backs to Claypotts

Across the Backs to Claypotts 2
Alex Glass

Barlinnie Prison

Barlinne viewed from Gartcraig Road

Barlinnie Prison

Empty Claypotts flats

Claypotts empties

Demolition of Claypotts

Demolishing Claypotts 2

Demolishing Claypotts

Demolition of Ruchazie
Alex Glass

High Ruchazie Doctors Surgery

Doctor's Surgery High Ruchazie

Doctor's Surgery High Ruchazie 2

Gartcraig Road

Gartcraig Road looking over to Barlinnie

Gartcraig Road Pensioners Houses

Hogganfield Loch

Hogganfield Loch Ducks

Hogganfield Loch in the Snow 2

Hogganfield Loch in the Snow

Buses on Gartloch Road

Possible Gartloch Road
Alex Glass

Ruchazie Primary School

Ruchazie Primary School from Elibank Street 2

Ruchazie Primary School from Elibank Street

Sunset over Barlinnie

Ruchazie Sunset
Alex Glass

Blackhill

Gas Tower

Glasgow's Miles Better

Blackhill 2

Blackhill

Blackhill 3

Enpty House
Alex Glass

More to follow soon

Let us hear about your memories if you grew up in the area or have a connection there.

Would be great to see any old and new photos too.
smb95

When were these photos taken?
Alex Glass

between 1985-96

Why?
cybers

smb95 wrote:
When were these photos taken?


When Glasgow had a Slogan that actually worked. No council in the U.K ever managed to come remotely close to the Mr Men based Catchphrase that is still to this day associated with the City ...

Why it was dropped in favour of "New Dynamics" that failed to even impress travel companies is beyond me...
Catnip

Great set!  
norrie

I am glad to see that some photos of the housing estates have been caught on film

Thanks for sharing

My aunt lived in Ruchazie, cant remember the street, she moved from Bleinhem st Springburn in the 50s
There was a big bing near her and it was a great attraction to the kids

We visited mostly at Christmas, long bus journey from Milton to Ruchazie
Alex Glass

More from the John Macdonald Collection

Refurbishing Avondale Street

Avondale Street redeveloped

Avondale Street redeveloped 6

Avondale Street redeveloped 5

Avondale Street redeveloped 4

Avondale Street redeveloped 3

Avondale Street redeveloped 2
Alex Glass

It isn't often that a set of photos come along that provide an insight into an area covering a period of change. There will be more posted that show some of the changes taking place in a part of Ruchazie in the mid 1990's.

To add to the fantastic on the ground photographs there is also this aerial photo showing the whole of the Low End as I knew it. Much had changed from the time I left in 1982 and there is a lot more gone since 1994 when this photo was taken.

Anyone who lived there will recognise many of the familiar places.

Ruchazie Helicopter Pic
norrie

Hi Alex, is that all that is left of Ruchazie?
cybers

Not even that is left Norrie as they also cleared Milncroft Road, Craighousie Street Caprington Street in fact loads of the old style houses have been flattened and swanky back n front door semis adorn the place.
norrie

Hi Cybers, I have never been back since those days in the 50s but it was my impression that it was a pretty large estate
Gina

The same thing has happened to Easterhouse. I took my mother for a visit about 4 years ago and she barely recognised the street where we lived for 17 years. Today there are hardly any of the 50's built tenements left and there are still plenty of empty streets waiting to be built on.
fastnet

Some  from 2008.



June 2008 by john.mcknight, on Flickr


Dec 2008 by john.mcknight, on Flickr


Dec 2008 by john.mcknight, on Flickr


DSC_0047rs by john.mcknight, on Flickr
Alex Glass

Great photos fastnet

the four large five apartments in the second photo are 311/313/315/317 Gartcraig Road. My Mum and Dad lived there from 1967-99. I left in 1982 and it wasn't long after that they demolished Bankend Street.

There is a great aerial photo of Cranhill from the 1950 or 60's which shows part of Ruchazie. I will try and post it later.

The M8 through here followed the route of the Monklands Canal. Loads of happy memories of my youth on the banks and wandering all over the place.
Alex Glass

Before we arrive at the point where Fastnet's photos show there were was a lot of change to take place and much of the Low End was demolished. I have it in my mind that Balcomie Street was one of the first streets to be demolished. Hopefully someone with a clearer knowledge and memory will correct me if I am wrong. This next group of photos centre around the Balcomie/Claypotts demolition. Again thanks got to John Macdonald for giving permission to use his photos.

This is the rear of the Low End Shops

1F Claypotts Gone (Pt 1)(E from W Avondale)(Back N Avondale Close & shops left, back Elibank Close right)

The rear of Elibank Street

1H Claypotts Gone (Pt 3)(E from W Avondale)(Back Elibank Close)

On the right is the rear of Balcomie Street - The whole of Claypotts and the east part of Balcomie Street are gone

1I Claypotts Gone (left) & back Balcombie North Close Pre-Demo right (SE from W Avondale)

Rear of Balcomie Street

1J back Balcombie North Close Pre-Demo (SE from W Avondale)

Demolition commences

1K back Balcombie North Close Under Demo (SE from W Avondale)

Opposite side of Balcomie Street at the corner with Gartcraig Road

1L (Balcombie N Gone, S Intact)(All Occupied)

1L Balcombie North Close Cleanup (SE from W Avondale)

Site Cleared

1M Balcombie North Close Gone (Pt 1)(SE from W Avondale)

Rebuilding commences

1N Balcombie North Close Gone (Pt 2)(SE from W Avondale, Gartcraig Rd right)

1O Claypotts new (E from W Avondale)(back N Avondale Close & Shops left, back Elibank Close, right)

1P Claypotts New (E from W Avondale)

1Q Claypotts New (left) & back N Balcombie New (right)(E from W Avondale)(1)

1R Claypotts New (left) & back N Balcombie New (right)(E from SE Avondale)(2)

1S back Balcombie New (SE from W Avondale)(Gartcraig bg)

1T back North Balcombie New (SE from W Avondale)
fastnet

I have loads of Cranhill pics Alex but they are all quite recent.

I will wait until you have posted all of yours before posting them though.
Alex Glass

Fastnet Please feel free to post your photos I have only one more group to post at the moment and want to wait before posting then.

The new ones would also fit in so please post as many as you can.

The wider the variety the better it will be  
fastnet

I will upload them tomorrow Alex.

I even had one published in the GHA mag your news....
Alex Glass

Looking forward to seeing them Fastnet.    
Ruchazie Rat

Ruchazie - Musings on a New Scheme

Surreal as it`ll strike young members, in the long-gone past, Corporations/Councils built social housing.  And on a large scale.  Changed days!  (Of course, a lot of the time they didn`t make a good job of it.  The social/economic problems they wished to solve in the inner cities by displacing tenants to purpose built new housing areas were simply replaced by all new economic and social problems).  But it`s the thought that counts.

So, Ruchazie.  Basically, like all the new social housing estates built across the land, it can be said this was in part another aspect of the post World War II “Social Contract” between the Government and the people, (like the Welfare State and the NHS).  A new deal.  A new beginning.  Looking at the few readily available personal and family photos from the time, it`s fascinating to see how clean and tidy these schemes were kept by the Corporations and the residents.  The “Authorities” provided the brand new sprawling neigbourhoods.  And the tenants duly respected their new turf.  No graffiti.  No smashed windows.  No boarded up flats.  No trashed cars or lampposts.  Remember, most new estate residents came from inner city slums.  Laughable to people today, but the idea of inside toilets and even a bathroom was a dream come true.

But the “Social Contract” also went both ways.

These new housing estates were built during a long period of economic stability.  High employment.  Modest ambitions.  Enter Thatcher in 1979.  Thanks in part to her own personal jihad to obliterate certain traditional industries and their trade unions, (though many of these industries did have legitimate cause-for-concern regarding their continued economic viability), the economic picture across Britain sharply “sepiad”.  These estates, “working class suburbs” from one viewpoint, could now also be viewed as what they`d also always been all along.  Working class encampments.  What to do about all those tenants suddenly made unemployed?  And with plenty of others soon to join them?  (All thanks to the Tories throwing any and all industries to the tender mercies of free market forces).

How does the man of the house, whose worked all his adult life, comfort his own kids, when he can`t get his own head around the reality that he hasn`t lost his job.  But his entire profession?  And the kids themselves?  Go to school.  Work hard.  There will be a decent job for you there when you leave.  With little or no prospects, perhaps.  But money in your pocket and self-respect.  An invaluable member of society.  But.  Not any more.  All gone.  Overnight.  From Youth Opportunities to Restart to New Deal to Workfare.  Not quite what they`d been taught at school, yes?  And so the young became restless.  And the housing estates became a lot like concrete jungles.

I`m not justifying or excusing this social “development” of the Thatcher era.  Plenty of people caught in those same circumstances held out.  But.  When the politicians delivered, the people responded in kind.  And when they turned their backs on them, the reaction was duly proportionate.  Okay, I generalize.  The new schemes, in the beginning, were not all milk and honey.  (There were the legendary “gangs” lurking in the background.  But not in the foreground).

Which brings me to mid-1990`s Ruchazie and beyond.  The “closes” were all trashed, uncreated if you will, and selective streets reborn with a careful view to “scaling things down”.  This is why you`re unlikely ever again to see any new social housing but on such a large scale.  Too problematic when it all goes south.  Best keep it small.  More containable.  More concealable.  To this extent, I often wonder whether Ruchazie Proper could`ve been saved.  Despite being in the same political landscape of the time, Easterhouse, Cranhill, Drumchapel, I believe, managed to survive their own rigours and are thus probably more easily recognizable to their particular ex-pats.

Did you know Ruchazie has its` own entry in Wikipedia?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruchazie

Pay particular attention please to paragraph two.

Although small, Ruchazie is split into three distinct areas. The High-End, The Coby (the "posh bit", named from the street Cobington Place) and the largest, The Low-End, which is the Rangers End. It has gone from a bustling community of 10,000 in the 1970s to under 3,000 in 2008. The High-End has been expanded recently with new housing on Gilbertfield Street overlooking Hogganfield Loch.

And yet, back in the late 1960`s/early 1970`s, I don`t remember it being overcrowded or teeming.  There was certainly a sense of community and communities-within-communities.  An evolution, if you will, of the tenement mentality.  And that`s how I tend to view the “closes”.  Modern tenements.  An attempt to incorporate whatever aspects worked about the old tenements, (housing sizeable numbers of people in a relatively limited area), and adapt it to meet the contemporary needs of the people of the day.  Agreed, it didn`t pass with flying colours.  Mistakes were made.  But the intention was sincere.

And despite these “flaws”, as somone who was taken to see his Granny and Granda doon the Bridgeton and Calton every other weekend, I was very aware of how they lived and, by comparison and good fortune, we lived.  As I said earlier, ambitions were modest back then.  I don`t dispute these schemes were perfect either back then or now, or especially for a long dark sustained period during the 1980`s and 1990`s.  But there were good times back before then if you were young and growing up.

The new schemes were, in large part, an endorsement that when our betters provided for us in terms of the “Social Contract”, the hoi poi, for the most part, rose to the challenge and kept “their end of the bargain”.  “Scum” don`t usually create themselves.  Nature abhors a vacuum.  Especially one created by a Westminster-engineered opportunities-guzzling black hole taking up prolonged residence on the social and political landscape.

So, Viva Ruchazie of old!  I hope we can recreate that special moment-in-time with this thread, where other well-intentioned Ruchazie threads have stumbled, so as to educate and illuminate not only current Ruchazians but the descendants of ex-pats, either living at home or abroad.

   
fastnet

Finally dug out a few Cranhill pics.


Cranhill by john.mcknight, on Flickr


cranhill by john.mcknight, on Flickr


Cranhill by john.mcknight, on Flickr


Cranhill. by john.mcknight, on Flickr
fastnet

The one that was published in "Your news"


Cranhill pano by john.mcknight, on Flickr
norrie

Hi Fastnet, good shots, like the 2cnd one in B&W
Ruchazie Rat

RUCHAZIE BOUNDARIES

Having lived my primary school years in The Low End of the scheme from the late 60`s onwards, this is,to the best of my recollection, Ruchazie`s boundaries.  Or, at least, the "stomping grounds" with which I am most familiar.





Apologies if I have underestimated the limits I`ve marked out.  If so, can anyone correct this?  Either with written comment in a reply to this post or with a marked reposting of this photo with corrections/ammendments.
cybers

Everything South of the M8 is wrong Cranhill - Riddrie and High Carntyne are not within Ruchazie boundaries As I am led to believe the canal was originally the boundary.

Maybe I am wrong  
Ruchazie Rat

SOUTH MILNCROFT RD & EAST GARTCRAIG RD - SHORTLIVED REFURBISHED CLOSES

Looking at Alex`s posting of John Macdonald`s wonderful aerial shot of The Low End of Ruchazie, I found a curious point of interest when comparing it with Fastnet`s subsequent photos.

The Brown Marking shows the derelict area left by the removal of Claypotts Road`s closes.  The Yellow Circle shows the refurbished closes of Caprington Street and Drumlochy Road.  The Red Circle shows  the refurbished family apartments in Craighouse Street and Milncroft Road.

The Green Markings show what caught my interest.  The Green Marking opposite the Red Circle implies more refurbished apartments or closes.  The other Green Marking on the left of this one covers the rest of Milncroft Road`s south side and stretches round into the east of Gartcraig Road.  This shows what seems to be refurbished closes.

John`s aerial shot is dated 1994.




Fastnet`s photos are on Page 2.  Dated 2008, they`re taken from Cranhill High Rises, covering the left hand area seen in John`s aerial shot.  In particular, the second photo caught my interest.




The Red Markings show the absence of the refurbished closes covering Milncroft Road and Gartcraig Road.  If John`s aerial`s correctly dated, these new closes last 14 years or less.  Does this mean the Council built them, the Glasgow Housing Association (formed in 2003) inherited them, then later demolished them?  If so, when did they get rid of them?  And why?

Can anyone shed any light on the matter, please?
smb95

Ruchazie Rat wrote:
The Red Markings show the absence of the refurbished closes covering Milncroft Road and Gartcraig Road.  If John`s aerial`s correctly dated, these new closes last 14 years or less.  Does this mean the Council built them, the Glasgow Housing Association (formed in 2003) inherited them, then later demolished them?  If so, when did they get rid of them?  And why?

Can anyone shed any light on the matter, please?

I've tried using Google Earth to look at historical imagery. It would appear that the closes on Milncroft Road were demolished in the late 90s, early 2000s, can't tell when as the earliest imagery dating after the closes were built is from 2002. The closes on Gartcraig Road were demolished between 2002-2005. I think the demolition of the closes was City Council decided.
Ruchazie Rat

RECREATIONAL PURSUITS - ROPE SWINGS

Back in the day when Croftcroighn Park was a proper (and grandiose) park, and in my time there I mean late 60`s to mid 70`s, one of the fav pastimes, though mostly in summer was playing on tree swings.  These were exactly as described. Thick industrial rope, with several thick twines wrapped around one another to form the main rope, which we tied to a tree branch.  At the bottom, there would be several big knots and, as the rope was thick enough to start with, this meant you had somewhere to easily park your ass and wrap your thighs around.

So what? you may ask.  Well, a bit like choosing to buy a house, it all came down to location.  And here`s where I distinctly remember at least three locations in and around the north and east of the park.




In the first blow-up, I`ve recreated where the park`s old north wall used to run.  This was actually the old stone/boulder wall of the farm that stood on the land before it became the park and was incorporated into the park`s boundaries, located just south of the bend in Drumlochy Road.  As this wall was about 12 feet high, you`ll get a better understanding of the unique advantage that a rope tied to the tree in the yellow circle had to offer.  You could literally sit on the rope standing on the wall and step off into space....



A bit more on the safe side would`ve been the rope tied to either of the trees in the red and pink circles.  This area is at the bottom of Boghall Road, just south of Croftcroighn Road before it bends west, on the left of the photo, to run down the park`s eastern boundary.



You might notice that these three specific locations all have something in common.  They`re all just "doon the road" from the schools!

A tell-tale sign of an abandoned tree swing location would be the big baldy patch right under the swing`s "feet radius", caused by the dragging of feet when lazying about back and forth on the swing.  Another sign was the "broken arm" tree branch.  This meant the branch was knackered under the constant strain and had sagged or half-snapped off.  That being the case, laziness being the easiest solution to our such minds, someone would shimmy up the rope to the branch itself, untie the rope, move it further back along the branch nearer the tree stump, to a strong unworn area, then just refasten it, and shimmy back down the rope.  Hey, presto!  Normal service resumed after a short delay...

I`m sure there were plenty of other areas in and around the scheme where rope swings took up temporary school holiday recreational residence.  Anyone care to pitch in?

   
sputnik

our rope swing was in a disused cinema called the bank in clydebank where we would risk our lives by swinging on a rope tied to the rafter above the balcony.we would swing right out over the stalls and back.proper seriously risky stuff.
cybers

Ah the tree swing.... Dangerous enough on its own but then you had to throw into the mox the danger of the 8 or so pile on BOARDIES....

That was the true test of the scaffie ropes metal  

Barrowfield had a great dangerous playpark called The Bambury where Rope swings and climbing frames built out of railway sleepers to ridiculous heights were the normal. There was always a swing out over the dung drying heaps at the top of Biggar Street too from the abattoir next to the Travellers camp.

The first tree swing I ever remember playing on was in the grounds of the Old Milncroft Primary School on a Tree just below the water tower off Skerryvore Road .... Proper scary stuff to a primary schooler that and the kicking thrown in by the marauding Queenslie mob who liked to sniff glue and beat up weans.
Ruchazie Rat

cybers wrote:
Ah the tree swing.... Dangerous enough on its own but then you had to throw into the mox the danger of the 8 or so pile on BOARDIES....

That was the true test of the scaffie ropes metal  


Yes!  How could I have forgotten that!!  How many pals/passersbys (!) can you cram onto the "assknot seat" at the bottom of the rope without severing the tree`s branch?!  That explains why the rope was forever being slid back nearer the tree stump cos of the branch being split or cracked all the time.  Wear & tear!!
   

cybers wrote:
Barrowfield had a great dangerous playpark called The Bambury where Rope swings and climbing frames built out of railway sleepers to ridiculous heights were the normal. There was always a swing out over the dung drying heaps at the top of Biggar Street too from the abattoir next to the Travellers camp..


The Bambury rings a bell!  At (the-then just opened) St Mungo`s Secondary along at Crownpoint Road back in the mid-70`s, we had to leg it down to a school in Barrowfield for all the metalwork and woodwork classes, so that meant one morning/afternoon a week.  I think the school was Bowden Street.  Ring any bells?  We`d troop down Fielden Street into London Road, then head down a south street and we were there.  Us First Years got all the bull scare-stories from Those Above Us, (Second Years, etc), about watching out for all the Barrowfield Crowd who`ll "do" us on sight.  Like the Sioux or the Apaches or something!

cybers wrote:
The first tree swing I ever remember playing on was in the grounds of the Old Milncroft Primary School on a Tree just below the water tower off Skerryvore Road .... Proper scary stuff to a primary schooler that and the kicking thrown in by the marauding Queenslie mob who liked to sniff glue and beat up weans.


Milncroft Primary School?  That couldn`t been the Milncroft Road in Ruchazie.  Was there another Milncroft Road in Glasgow?  Or was the street name re-assigned when the original street became derelict?
   
Ruchazie Rat

Here`s one of my previous photos identifying the rope swing site on the north wall of Croftcroighn Park.




Here`s a recent photo, curtesy of weskyman, who posted this previously on hiddenglasgow.co.uk.  I`ve doctored it slightly for to tie-in with the shot above.  The camera points north west.




The houses we see, just off-centre, are the back of the ones on Drumlochy Road.  The houses on the left of the photo are the back of the houses on Caprington Street east side.  Strange.  The surviving original section of the north wall doesn`t look so high.  Has it been reduced since the 70`s?  Or maybe everything seemed bigger when you were younger or, rather, smaller (and up to no good)!
cybers

Only the school "Milncroft" was On Skerryvore Road,




Had this debate a few times with the wife how she could never understand why it was called that.
As for the soiux and apache thing its probably as close a description as any  
Ruchazie Rat

Thanks very much. Cybs.  Looking at the flick, I can see the west side of Ruchazie up the top end .  I`ve yellow squared the area from the canal up to Gartloch Road.  In the right side of the square, that`s Croftcroighn Park.


Fat Cat

I lived in Ruchazie low end for about 25 years and never, ever remember it being called the Rangers end.   I loved it when i was young, it was like the country.   It was really high up, the views for our 5 apartment were brilliant and watching the sunset in the summer - there was nothing like it - that big huge orange sun going down at the back of the high flats (?Red Road).  However, we can't really get nostalgic about the houses.   Huge 5 apartments heated with a fireplace in the living room and one in the top room - baltic in the winter.  Single glazing.  Condensation was rife.    Then it just became so run down.   Got to say although it has fancier houses now, it is still grim which is a real shame.
rockar82

Their is some really great pics of the old Low End in here, i was born and bred in the low end but moved out of their nearly 10 years ago and could never find any pictures of the old ruchazie particularly Drumlochy road Caprington street and old claypotts road as i look at the pictures on here i look back fondly at those old tenements and just see one big plaything when they were closed up and ready for demolition.Thanks for the memories to those who uploaded them.
Ruchazie Rat

Fat Cat wrote:
I lived in Ruchazie low end for about 25 years and never, ever remember it being called the Rangers end.   I loved it when i was young, it was like the country.   It was really high up, the views for our 5 apartment were brilliant and watching the sunset in the summer - there was nothing like it - that big huge orange sun going down at the back of the high flats (?Red Road).  However, we can't really get nostalgic about the houses.   Huge 5 apartments heated with a fireplace in the living room and one in the top room - baltic in the winter.  Single glazing.  Condensation was rife.    Then it just became so run down.   Got to say although it has fancier houses now, it is still grim which is a real shame.


Yes, I know what you mean.  I had a pal who stayed in one of the 5 apartments back around the 70`s for a good few years.  It was in Craighouse Street and the back looked out onto Croftcroighn Park.  Below is a crop-and-enlargement of the helicopter shot taken by John Macdonald featured on page 1 of this thread.  (Take note:  this aerial was taken in 1996 when these 5 and 3 apartments had been refurbished).




THE RED X`s: mark the 5 apartments on Craighouse Street.  (I`m unsure about the block on the top right as Craighouse Street snakes east into Caprington street.  I believe this was a close back in my day but looks like it may have been refurbished into several 5 or 3 apartments).  THE GREEN X`s mark the opposite row of Craighouse Street.  From memory, I think these were always 3 apartments. The GREEN X on the left of this mark-up is on Milncroft Road.  These, I believe, used to be 5 apartments.  I`m unsure what they are now.

Answers, anyone?

You`re right about their up-and-downs.  Nice views in the summer, especially looking out into the park.  Must`ve been a miserable b*stard view in the winter, especially looking out into the park.  I believe quite a few tenants there had cats.  Musta been all that fast-food fodder in the park; birds, mice, etc.  Didn`t the birds make nests up in the 5`s gutters/roofs, causing probs?

If memory serves, (it was decades ago), you came in the front door and the staircase was on the right.  The very-big living room led off this to the left.  Confusion here;  the kitchen led off the back right of the living room but musta been L-shaped, cos I don`t remember the living room having front AND back windows, thus the kitchen had to have been L-shaped with the back windows being in there.  Still with me?!  Meantime, the first landing.  A biggish bedroom at the front and another at the back.  The bathroom was on the right of this back bedroom, looking out into the park, coming more-or-less off the staircase itself.  The second (and top) landing was just a repeat of the lower one with a bigger bedroom at the back because there wasn`t a bathroom up here.  Was there access to the loft?  No idea!

Anyway, as I say, a schoolmate of mine lived in one of them, so we`d all drop in and out of one another`s houses.  Thus, you remember what you did in them more than how they were laid out.  (Except, maybe, those 3 45-degree Mavis Riley wee pidgeon ornaments people had struck on their living room walls.  Just beside the fireplace that usually had that garrishly-coloured head-and-shoulder painting of a young, undressed gypsylike beauty leaning provocatively around from behind a tree.  Bleuch!  70`s bric-a-brac!).

THE YELLOW ARROW.  I do not remember a gap ever being in the middle of that row.  Was there?  Or was it “worked in” during the refurbishment?  Because that would mean one house must`ve been knocked down to create this.  If so, why bother?

Anyone able to clear that mystery up, please?

   
Fat Cat

Ruchazie Rat wrote:



THE RED X`s: mark the 5 apartments on Craighouse Street.  (I`m unsure about the block on the top right as Craighouse Street snakes east into Caprington street.  I believe this was a close back in my day but looks like it may have been refurbished into several 5 or 3 apartments).  THE GREEN X`s mark the opposite row of Craighouse Street.  From memory, I think these were always 3 apartments. The GREEN X on the left of this mark-up is on Milncroft Road.  These, I believe, used to be 5 apartments.  I`m unsure what they are now.

Answers, anyone?

You`re right about their up-and-downs.  Nice views in the summer, especially looking out into the park.  Must`ve been a miserable b*stard view in the winter, especially looking out into the park.  I believe quite a few tenants there had cats.  Musta been all that fast-food fodder in the park; birds, mice, etc.  Didn`t the birds make nests up in the 5`s gutters/roofs, causing probs?

If memory serves, (it was decades ago), you came in the front door and the staircase was on the right.  The very-big living room led off this to the left.  Confusion here;  the kitchen led off the back right of the living room but musta been L-shaped, cos I don`t remember the living room having front AND back windows, thus the kitchen had to have been L-shaped with the back windows being in there.  Still with me?!  Meantime, the first landing.  A biggish bedroom at the front and another at the back.  The bathroom was on the right of this back bedroom, looking out into the park, coming more-or-less off the staircase itself.  The second (and top) landing was just a repeat of the lower one with a bigger bedroom at the back because there wasn`t a bathroom up here.  Was there access to the loft?  No idea!

Anyway, as I say, a schoolmate of mine lived in one of them, so we`d all drop in and out of one another`s houses.  Thus, you remember what you did in them more than how they were laid out.  (Except, maybe, those 3 45-degree Mavis Riley wee pidgeon ornaments people had struck on their living room walls.  Just beside the fireplace that usually had that garrishly-coloured head-and-shoulder painting of a young, undressed gypsylike beauty leaning provocatively around from behind a tree.  Bleuch!  70`s bric-a-brac!).

THE YELLOW ARROW.  I do not remember a gap ever being in the middle of that row.  Was there?  Or was it “worked in” during the refurbishment?  Because that would mean one house must`ve been knocked down to create this.  If so, why bother?

Anyone able to clear that mystery up, please?

   


I lived on the 5s in Gartcraig.  You entered the front door in the hall which was quite small and had stairs off to the left with some storage under them, huge living room (double aspect as Kirsty Allsopp would say, we say two windaes), tiny kitchenette, up stairs was two bedrooms and the bathroom and upstairs again to another two bedrooms.   With no central heating, it was freezing.  We had a parrafin heater in the bathroom which was the warmest place in the house.   My mother always says a man must have designed them.   We also had the ducks on the wall, fibreglass curtains and antique gold pain in the hall.   Hideous.

I wasn't too familiar with Craighouse Street but used to walk by every day on my way to school in Cranhill so had to go over the bridge from Ruchazie to Cranhill.

We moved to Ruchazie when i was 3 and, if I remember correctly, was there a wee house or park keepers cottage behind the 5s in Craighouse Street.   My brother's girlfriend lived in Croftcroign and remembers the farm up there.  

   
Ruchazie Rat

Fat Cat wrote:
Ruchazie Rat wrote:



I lived on the 5s in Gartcraig.  You entered the front door in the hall which was quite small and had stairs off to the left with some storage under them, huge living room (double aspect as Kirsty Allsopp would say, we say two windaes), tiny kitchenette, up stairs was two bedrooms and the bathroom and upstairs again to another two bedrooms.   With no central heating, it was freezing.  We had a parrafin heater in the bathroom which was the warmest place in the house.   My mother always says a man must have designed them.   We also had the ducks on the wall, fibreglass curtains and antique gold pain in the hall.   Hideous.

I wasn't too familiar with Craighouse Street but used to walk by every day on my way to school in Cranhill so had to go over the bridge from Ruchazie to Cranhill.

We moved to Ruchazie when i was 3 and, if I remember correctly, was there a wee house or park keepers cottage behind the 5s in Craighouse Street.   My brother's girlfriend lived in Croftcroign and remembers the farm up there.  

   


Here`s that great West Quadrant aerial.





Now I`ve cropped it to focus on the Gartcraig Road area.  The 5`s you mention you lived in.  That`s the red and yellow rectangles.  The yellow one on the left, near the bridge leading down to the bus garage and Riddrie, I think is where Alex said he used to crash out late` 60`s.  Was that your block too?  "Distant neighbours" seperated by time?  Or was the red rectangle on the right your place?  The green rectangle`s the pensioners` block, which still stands after it`s late 20th century refurbishment.  (Sounds like a quote from some ponsy Islington real estate agent!  Sorry!)





"We moved to Ruchazie when i was 3 and, if I remember correctly, was there a wee house or park keepers cottage behind the 5s in Craighouse Street.

Yep, forgot about that.  There was.  Think it was about here, in the red rectangle.




"We also had the ducks on the wall, fibreglass curtains and antique gold pain in the hall.   Hideous. "

Fibreglass curtains?  You are kidding!  Such things possible?  Antique gold pain....????  Pain what?!  You mean, you had 3 gold antique birds flying in an upward line?  Think if you had REAL antique gold anything back in Ruchazie in them days... it wouldn`t stayed in your hall long too long.  Would`ve been "liberated" by some passing ne`erdowell at three in the morning!!
   
Gina

Fibreglass curtains were indeed real and my mother also had them. If you rubbed against them you would be itchy for ages afterwards.

As for Antique Gold paint, its colour can only be compared with the contents of a 2 week old baby's nappy and thankfully it has gone the way of avocado bathroom suites!
Fat Cat

Ruchazie Rat wrote:
Fat Cat wrote:
Ruchazie Rat wrote:



I lived on the 5s in Gartcraig.  You entered the front door in the hall which was quite small and had stairs off to the left with some storage under them, huge living room (double aspect as Kirsty Allsopp would say, we say two windaes), tiny kitchenette, up stairs was two bedrooms and the bathroom and upstairs again to another two bedrooms.   With no central heating, it was freezing.  We had a parrafin heater in the bathroom which was the warmest place in the house.   My mother always says a man must have designed them.   We also had the ducks on the wall, fibreglass curtains and antique gold pain in the hall.   Hideous.

I wasn't too familiar with Craighouse Street but used to walk by every day on my way to school in Cranhill so had to go over the bridge from Ruchazie to Cranhill.

We moved to Ruchazie when i was 3 and, if I remember correctly, was there a wee house or park keepers cottage behind the 5s in Craighouse Street.   My brother's girlfriend lived in Croftcroign and remembers the farm up there.  

   


Here`s that great West Quadrant aerial.





Now I`ve cropped it to focus on the Gartcraig Road area.  The 5`s you mention you lived in.  That`s the red and yellow rectangles.  The yellow one on the left, near the bridge leading down to the bus garage and Riddrie, I think is where Alex said he used to crash out late` 60`s.  Was that your block too?  "Distant neighbours" seperated by time?  Or was the red rectangle on the right your place?  The green rectangle`s the pensioners` block, which still stands after it`s late 20th century refurbishment.  (Sounds like a quote from some ponsy Islington real estate agent!  Sorry!)





"We moved to Ruchazie when i was 3 and, if I remember correctly, was there a wee house or park keepers cottage behind the 5s in Craighouse Street.

Yep, forgot about that.  There was.  Think it was about here, in the red rectangle.




"We also had the ducks on the wall, fibreglass curtains and antique gold pain in the hall.   Hideous. "

Fibreglass curtains?  You are kidding!  Such things possible?  Antique gold pain....????  Pain what?!  You mean, you had 3 gold antique birds flying in an upward line?  Think if you had REAL antique gold anything back in Ruchazie in them days... it wouldn`t stayed in your hall long too long.  Would`ve been "liberated" by some passing ne`erdowell at three in the morning!!
   


Fibre glass curtains were very real unfortunately and the antique gold painT was horrible, especially as it was painted on to woodchip.   I was indeed Alex's next door neighbour,his sister was the leader of our Girls Brigade and I was pally with his niece.  I remember the old boy who lived at the north end of the block was really posh (those were the days).   Glad I wasn't dreaming about the wee house in the park.
Alex Glass

When we moved to Gartcraig Road in 1967 it was as part of the slum clearances from the City Centre. Although the heating wasn't the best it was a much better house in a better location and I have many very happy memories of my childhood growing up in that house in Ruchazie.

I lived through much of the changes that were as a result of circumstances that were beyond our control but happened in many other communities across Glasgow.

There were bad times as well as good but I don't let the bad tarnish my the happy times I spent exploring all over extending from Alexandra Park to school in Garthamlock. Hopefully I will find some time to share some of my memories and recall many of the places I came to know well over the 15 years I spent growing up there till I left in 1982.
Ruchazie Rat

Fat Cat wrote:


Fibre glass curtains were very real unfortunately and the antique gold painT was horrible, especially as it was painted on to woodchip.   I was indeed Alex's next door neighbour,his sister was the leader of our Girls Brigade and I was pally with his niece.  I remember the old boy who lived at the north end of the block was really posh (those were the days).   Glad I wasn't dreaming about the wee house in the park.


Here`s a shot probably doubtless familar to many Ruchazians...  the Warden`s Hoose at Barlinnie, conveniently situated on the south-west border of the scheme for all the youngsters choosing to go into the wrong line of work.  (Not bad for the big man, though, huh?  Let it not be said crime does not pay.  Well, in a roundabout sort-of-way, along the lines of job "perks" that is, if you see what I mean...)




If we cut off the car and garages to the right and limit the garden to about 15 feet at the front, back and sides of the house and enclose it in high black (decorative) railings, we sort-of have a reproduction of The Parky`s Hoose in Croftcroighn Park.  I`m pretty sure it had an upstairs but it`s possible it could`ve all been ground-level, like a cottage.  Also, I don`t think it was all whitewashed like that.  (A suitable "metaphor" for the prison service?!)  I think the brickwork could`ve been a bit more old-fashioned.  Like the stone blocks in a castle.  In that regard, The Parky`s Hoose may very well have been the house of the original farmer as the park was basically all farmland, like the whole area itself,  before the scheme was built around it with the "park"`s landscape being modified to handle leisure ammenities like the swings and roundabout area, putting course, bowling green, tennis court, etc.

And below, as posted already, here`s a basic idea of where it sat.  Just off to the left of the original main path, (the west side), immediately when you came through the Milncroft Road entrance down at the Park`s south side.




Here it is, marked basically, on an aerial.  I`m sure that`ll give you a better picture.  (Sorry, no pun intended.  Should`ve said "a better idea"!!)


cybers

For the sake of accuracy once again may i point out that the governors house is located in Lethamhill and not Ruchazie.

If your going to do this at least keep it factual.
Alex Glass

As Cybers has already said it is Lethamhill and the photo looks very similar to one I took a couple of years ago.

Before the Prison was built this area was also farmland.

Many of the houses in Lethamhill were built for Prison Officers. It is such a shame that in todays society having a house that goes with the job is interpreted as something wrong. We forget that like any job if you either move on or leave the job you also lost the house. Plus rather than being a perk they were by way of compensation for average or low wages.

A very good friend of mine became a Prison Officer in the early 80's and did a spell in Barlinnie where he came across many of the infamous underworld figures of the time as well as guy he knew from the local area. He is still with the service today and has moved around the country working in most of our prisons. If he had a Prison Officers home in Lethamhill he would only have lived there for no more than a year at most. He is now a Prison Governor and I don't think he has been more that five years as governor in any one prison. So I don't think being a Prison Officer or Governor does pay.
Alex Glass

Fat Cat wrote:

Fibre glass curtains were very real unfortunately and the antique gold painT was horrible, especially as it was painted on to woodchip.   I was indeed Alex's next door neighbour,his sister was the leader of our Girls Brigade and I was pally with his niece.  I remember the old boy who lived at the north end of the block was really posh (those were the days).   Glad I wasn't dreaming about the wee house in the park.


We also had the fibre glass curtains in our house.

The old boy you refer to was Mr Higney (not sure this is the correct spelling) I have a couple of photos of him and is son Paul and his daughter Caroline. He was a great neighbour and we organised little putting tournaments using his putter and the little bit of grass in his back garden where he cut a whole to practice putting.

So many memories and mainly happy ones too.
Fat Cat

Alex Glass wrote:
Fat Cat wrote:

Fibre glass curtains were very real unfortunately and the antique gold painT was horrible, especially as it was painted on to woodchip.   I was indeed Alex's next door neighbour,his sister was the leader of our Girls Brigade and I was pally with his niece.  I remember the old boy who lived at the north end of the block was really posh (those were the days).   Glad I wasn't dreaming about the wee house in the park.


We also had the fibre glass curtains in our house.

The old boy you refer to was Mr Higney (not sure this is the correct spelling) I have a couple of photos of him and is son Paul and his daughter Caroline. He was a great neighbour and we organised little putting tournaments using his putter and the little bit of grass in his back garden where he cut a whole to practice putting.

So many memories and mainly happy ones too.


Aye, the putting green.   And the garden hose in the summer - now that would deffo be misconstrued today!  

As for the prison governor's pad, I remember they had horses and pot bellied pig at one point.  Also, the prisoners used to do the gardening in the prison warders houses.
Alex Glass

The prisoners use to grow vegetables too in the grounds just outside the old wall before the built the new one which restricted our access and then that was removed when they built the motorway.

The turnips were a special favourite of our group on our wander inside the fields.
cybers

My pal has a tied house in Fraserburgh but he has to work with the dregs of society. He said that he reckons the only reason they still have tied houses is to make sure they all still come back to work. I once made the mistake of calling it a perk and was put right on that one as you say Alex it merely offsets what in reality is a sh!t wage.

Were the ones in Lethamhill not sold off by the SPS to try and raise revenue for the new work that needed done to bring Barlinnie up to the required E.U standards ? and more importantly is the Officers Club still there at the back of the houses on Lethamhill Road ?
Alex Glass

I do recall they sold off the Prison Officers Houses although I don't know why but I don't think many Prison Officers still lived in them by the time they were sold off.

I am sure there was a story about the club losing its license due to the amount if trouble most weekends. Then again a club like this only works if your clientele live close and can walk home. I think the club became less popular due to fewer Officers living close and therefore wasn't making money.

They do a job that few would want and deal with people who are in a place no one would want to be.
Ruchazie Rat

cybers wrote:
For the sake of accuracy once again may i point out that the governors house is located in Lethamhill and not Ruchazie.

If your going to do this at least keep it factual.


Sorry.  On reflection, it does seem out of place to have located it by the prison.  Not a good idea viz-a-viz the Warden or his family`s safety.  Also, while I had many good adventures in and around the Bar-L, I couldn`t quite place this house as being near there.  I mistakenly assumed, thru the fog of memory, it therefore must be nearby.

On inspecting the photo, I see quite a presence of trees in the background.  Thus, it could never have been near Bar-L.  (No trees for security reasons, if nothing else).  Furthermore, to use a bit of logic ("Cap`n"), the height and density of the trees most likely would place the house either in or near Croftcroighn Park and I definitely know it wasn`t there.  Viola!  The most likely best guess-locale (by deduction if nothing else) would`ve been up near the golf course somewhere.

Ta for the correction.  Do you, or anyone have any more photos of this/the Officers` Club, particularly from the viewpoint of their individual locations and their surroundings?  Or, for that matter, the Parkie`s Hoose?  (Alternatively, with a bit of effort, you could always do what I did with a crude marked-up aerial to "recreate" the desired effect).

By the way, my words were meant in jest, I do not denigrate the work of the Prison Service.  Read my comment again, please, and I`m sure you`ll realise that.



Meantime, the said Warden`s Hoose photo.   Is this snap the one you refer to, Alex?  Those cars.  Could they be something to do with the Prison Service?  Thus, when you took the shot was the house still part of the job package?  When did you take it?
   
cybers

The Governors  house was located right beside the prison his upper minions were generally his neighbours too in fact almost all the houses in this image were tied housing


2014-01-08_1858 by David C Laurie, on Flickr
Ruchazie Rat

Ah!  Many thanks.  So, the YELLOW AREA would`ve been where the prison used to come out to?  And the PINK AREA where the bus depot used to be?





(Doesn`t that kinda mean that I was right in my original post?  The Warden`s Hoose was down by the nick?!)

   
cybers

The yellow box was original the storage yard for materials in the refurb the wall although replaced follows almost exactly the older wall... Bus station I cannot comment on as I have no memory of a bus station though there was a halt at the main gate  


A wee yesterday gem
Fat Cat

Smashing fotie Cybers    The bus station was indeed in the pink area.   Many memories of being woken by the buses revving up in the morning.   We used to catch the 35 bus in the morning to school.   This was the area of Gartcraig Farm (good photo on one of the Glasgow related websites, temporary brain freeze )
Fat Cat

Had a discussion with a friend recently about this thread.   She thinks she remembers Spey Street being Gartcraig Road at some point.   Anyone shed any light on it.  Ta.
rockar82

Alex Glass wrote:
More to follow soon

Let us hear about your memories if you grew up in the area or have a connection there.

Would be great to see any old and new photos too.


As i stated in an earlier post on this particular part of the site Ruchazie was a home for me from 1982-2007 my mother moved their at the age of 16 we stayed in the low end, and we stayed in three streets Drumlochy Road (2 houses) Elibank street and Balcomie street the reason for all the moves was as they were pulling down the old blocks we would be decanted to different parts of the scheme and always into a house that managed to get colder.90% of the people their were great you always have that percentage of the margin that drags places down
Alex Glass

Fat Cat wrote:
Had a discussion with a friend recently about this thread.   She thinks she remembers Spey Street being Gartcraig Road at some point.   Anyone shed any light on it.  Ta.


I will look out my old map of the area and see if this is right.

Get back to you soon
Ruchazie Rat

What a great shot!  Ta!  It would be pointing north-east, yeah?  Any idea when it was taken?  That road on the right of the picture... that`s Lethamhill Road?  And the other road on the far right... that would then be Gartcraig Road?  



THE YELLOW RECTANGLE.  Is that The Warden`s Hoose (or whatever it was before becoming The Warden`s Hoose)?  THE PINK RECTANGLE.  Is that the Farmer`s Hoose on Gartcraig Farm (before, presumably, the farm got taken over by the Corporation and turned into the bus depot)?  Or did this this building become The Prison Officers` Club, as mentioned earlier by Alex?

 (P.S.  It was a bus depot not a bus station, although going by the way some drivers charged along the access road into The Big Shed after a shift, you`d think it was Silverstone or Brands Hatch!  Just as well it wasn`t a station, they`d been done for manslaughter/wayneslaughter sooner or later!)    
cybers

Not sure of the date taken but if you know when Lethamhill Place was built that will give you a rough idea as the image i have has it as an almost completed building site.
Fat Cat

Gartcraig Garage was built in circa 1961 and you can see the oil storage tanks in the top left of the pic.  As for the pink rectangle, I think that is the first block of semis in Lethamhill Road.   The farm was cleared prior to this although there is a small bit of wall retained at the top of Lethamhill Rd (so I was reliably informed by an old timer in the area).
Alex Glass

The Prison Officers Club was in the middle of Lethamhill Road.

As Fat Cat has already pointed out the Bus Garage is already in situ as can been seen by the large road into the garage at the top left of this picture.
rockar82

[img]
[/img]

I have done a small edit to the image that was uploaded earlier in the post to show where the entrance to the old bus depot was, it is now GCC roads department, the building was salvaged about 12 years ago.
SomeRandomBint

Alex Glass wrote:
More from the John Macdonald Collection

Refurbishing Avondale Street


Avondale Street redeveloped 5




Joined the site just to ask - when were these photos taken? I'm only curious as I was at school in the 90s with a wee guy called Benny C who was constantly getting into bother for "tagging" various places to and from Smithycroft Secondary School (and also inside the place!) because he insisted on using his name and initial. Which would have been fine if he hadn't been the only Benny C for 10 miles!

I just wondered if that tag belonged to same wee guy I knew?
rockar82

SomeRandomBint wrote:
Alex Glass wrote:
More from the John Macdonald Collection

Refurbishing Avondale Street


Avondale Street redeveloped 5




Joined the site just to ask - when were these photos taken? I'm only curious as I was at school in the 90s with a wee guy called Benny C who was constantly getting into bother for "tagging" various places to and from Smithycroft Secondary School (and also inside the place!) because he insisted on using his name and initial. Which would have been fine if he hadn't been the only Benny C for 10 miles!

I just wondered if that tag belonged to same wee guy I knew?


I think the photo was taken mid to late 90's when Avondale street was being refurbed, the tag belongs to a boy who's family stayed in ruchazie for years i won't name his surname but i do know he did attend Smithy secondary school, hope that narrows it for you.
SomeRandomBint

Cheers Rockar82 - then yes, it's definitely the same Benny I knew!

Cracking pictures on this thread. I grew up down the road in Carntyne but knew a lot of folks from Ruchazie at school. It's amazing to see how the place has changed over the years - I do kinda miss the old Ruchazie, but people who still live there have said how much happier they are in a wee hoose rather than up a flight of stairs.
Ruchazie Rat

SomeRandomBint wrote:
Alex Glass wrote:
More from the John Macdonald Collection

Refurbishing Avondale Street


Avondale Street redeveloped 5




Joined the site just to ask - when were these photos taken? I'm only curious as I was at school in the 90s with a wee guy called Benny C who was constantly getting into bother for "tagging" various places to and from Smithycroft Secondary School (and also inside the place!) because he insisted on using his name and initial. Which would have been fine if he hadn't been the only Benny C for 10 miles!

I just wondered if that tag belonged to same wee guy I knew?


According to John Macdonald, whom I contacted for permission for us to publish his photos, (and that small "d" in his surname is deliberate), he took them around 1996.  The helicopter shot of The West Quadrant was taken in 1994.  I suppose "Benny C"`s a bit more palitable than some other local lingo that wouldn`t e-travelled quite so agreeably... "Fleeto Ya Bass... Come Inta Me!!!"

   
Ruchazie Rat

This is my edit of rockar82`s edit of cybers original aerial posting of Barlinnie.  (Still with me?)




rockar82 added the blue rectangle marking the "Bus Depot Entrance".  I have marked the streets to the right of the photo for continuity purposes with the current aerial photo below.




Sorry this photo ain`t bigger.

If memory serves me right, THE YELLOW RECTANGLE is the huge brick and corrugated tinsheet-roofed bus depot itself.  THE PURPLE RECTANGLE is the very tall bus shower, triggered by ground rollers when the double-deckers drove into/through it, and THE PURPLE LINE is where the Monklands Canal ran behind it.  (This area was substantially widened and deepened when constructing the M8).  The gas tanks, the big steel drums on top of the small brick support shown at the extreme top left of the black and white photo, I believe, were still present back in the days of my mispent youth when I hung around there.

Have I got it right?  Does anyone have past ground or aerial photos of the bus depot itself?
Ruchazie Rat

Well, it turns out I have aerial and ground photos of the bus depot myself!  I got these two off the net last summer.  The aerial one was from Glasgow Transport Memorabilia.  The ground shot, I`m sorry to say, I can`t remember which site I got it from.

First up, the aerial shot.  Sorry for the size.  If you go to the above-mentioned site, you can perhaps download it in a bigger resolution for yourselves.




This points north-west. The groundpath/access road running into the picture from the bottom will be instantly recognisable to anyone like myself who frittered away a good portion of their youth around the depot.  The small building in front of the third shed, the one on the photo`s right, mystifies me.  Was this a temporary building removed after construction?  Next, a captioned ground photo.  Here we see construction of the first of the three sheds above.





On the picture`s left, the little white house must be the warden`s residence.  Barlinnie Prison spread out closer towards the sheds sometime after their completion.  The crane`s probably laying down the pathway/access road we see in the aerial photo.  On the left side of the roof, at 11 o`clock, we see a large cluster of houses off in the distance.  (The neighbourhood up from Blackhill?)  On the right of the shed, at 2 o`clock, there`s a much smaller house in the distance, reminiscent of the warden`s house.   Would this have been sitting on the corner of Cumbernauld Road and Gartloch Road?  Off to the picture`s right border, we see a line of thick trees signifying, I`m sure, the south border of Lethamhill Golf Course.  Below the trees, we see a large area of dense brush.  This must`ve been the foilage on the south bank of the Monklands Canal, thus the canal itself is obscured in the picture.  This embankment sloped down steeply towards the depot but must`ve been landscaped by the builders during construction because I recall it abruptly ending in a brick wall, with a 10 to 12 foot drop, that ran along the north side of the depot`s compound.

Strange.  I always thought that brick wall ran parallel, (side by side), with the north side of the depot itself.  But this picture suggests, together with the absence of any canal in the aerial shot, they must`ve ran at about 45 degrees away from one another.
cybers

Nice work in tracking that down.
rockar82

Great find RR how times change eh.
Wee May

Gap in Craighouse Street

There was a gap in between the houses in Craighouse Street. If I can remember correctly, when you came out the back door, it was a slabbed area for hanging out washing and the coal cellar. You came out the gate, and there was a path which ran through the back and this split the washing area from the tenants actual 'garden', then at the back of this was the park.
The houses leading up to Caprington Street were also '5's' but the houses after Caprington Street leading up to Elibank Street were closes.
I moved to Caprington Street as a baby in '57. I attended Ruchazie Primary from '62-'69 and then Garthamlock from '69-'72. I loved my childhood there, had loads of friends, and lots of happy memories. We moved to Castlemilk, of all places, in '74. I still have inlaw-type family who livein Ruchazie.
I never ever knew Low Ruchazie as 'the Rangers end' it was always much quieter than the 'high end' - or so we thought  
rockar82

Re: Gap in Craighouse Street

Wee May wrote:
There was a gap in between the houses in Craighouse Street. If I can remember correctly, when you came out the back door, it was a slabbed area for hanging out washing and the coal cellar. You came out the gate, and there was a path which ran through the back and this split the washing area from the tenants actual 'garden', then at the back of this was the park.
The houses leading up to Caprington Street were also '5's' but the houses after Caprington Street leading up to Elibank Street were closes.
I moved to Caprington Street as a baby in '57. I attended Ruchazie Primary from '62-'69 and then Garthamlock from '69-'72. I loved my childhood there, had loads of friends, and lots of happy memories. We moved to Castlemilk, of all places, in '74. I still have inlaw-type family who livein Ruchazie.
I never ever knew Low Ruchazie as 'the Rangers end' it was always much quieter than the 'high end' - or so we thought  


Can't argue with any of that mate.
Fat Cat

Re: Gap in Craighouse Street

Wee May wrote:
There was a gap in between the houses in Craighouse Street. If I can remember correctly, when you came out the back door, it was a slabbed area for hanging out washing and the coal cellar. You came out the gate, and there was a path which ran through the back and this split the washing area from the tenants actual 'garden', then at the back of this was the   


I lived in the 5s in Gartcraig and the back garden was the same, only it used to back on to the canal then the M8.  When I moved away, I really missed the sound of the traffic which was strangely soothing.   We also had a coal shed which was really creepy.  Full of spiders
Ruchazie Rat

RUCHAZIE - LOW END - WEST OF CROFTCROIGHN PARK - BINMENS` PATHWAYS

Here`s a reminder  of John Macdonald`s aerial shot of the scheme`s low end.  I`ve cropped, enlarged and labelled a portion of this photo and posted it underneath to illustrate the subject of this post.  And below that "doctored" photo, I`ve also posted a marked current overhead shot too.



The row of houses predominant in the photo below features the back of Craighouse Street`s east row as it runs off Milncroft Road before it bends west heading up to meet Elibank Street.  It seems deceptive from the air.  But, checking Google`s current street view, I`m glad to find my childhood memories of Craighouse Street remain true.  The street does slope downward as it leaves Milncroft Road.  I mention this as the "lie" of the land was not "terraformed" (levelled or straightened out) when the scheme was built on this former country land.  The Binmens` Pathways, marked in YELLOW, seemed to be exclusive to the area I`ve marked out around Craighouse Street and Milncroft Road.  This might`ve been because the area around Croftcroighn Park, modestly grandoise in its` heyday, was carefully groomed on the drawing board to leave an impression on visitors to the park from other neighbourhoods. This would also explain why the towering five apartments were built here rather than tenement "closes" which made up the rest of the area. (And would also shed light on why the "fives" were spared during the 80`s/90`s "cleansing of the closes" and refurbished instead).

So.  The Binmens` Pathways.  Reserved, it seemed, for Craighouse Street and Milncroft Road only, the Downtown Abbey of Ruchazie. These pathways for the binmen were simply black tarred strips about 3 feet wide.  Not proper concrete or slabs.  They ran parallel with the rear of the houses.  Thus, on the path`s west side, it bordered the houses` concrete-paved back gardens.  And on the path`s east side were "proper" grass back gardens with 8 foot tall green metal railings separating them from the park itself.  On either side of the tar pathways were the "stick" fences.  Rows of fences made up of 4 to 4 and a half foot high wooden sticks/poles.  Each about 6 inches from the next, all bound/threaded/strung out by metal wire, one string running about about 3 inches up from the ground and another running about 6 inches from the top of the poles/sticks.  As each stick was thus "tied" with a necklace of wire at top and bottom, it was easy to twist them out their wire housing.  1001 uses for kids of the time.  Rifles for playing John Wayne or Audie Murphy! Swords for playing Errol Flynn or Victor Mature! (see Google!).  Run one across your back with arms/shoulders wrapping each end.  Play Jesus on the cross to annoy your Ma!  Or a Spitfire attacking your mate the Messerschmitt (consult Google) to wind-up your War-weary Grandad!






Ultimately, these paths were for the binmen to gain access to the residents` bins.  The bins themselves were kept away from the front of the aforementioned streets.  (All about appearances for neighbouring visitors driving to the park, I imagine!).  Also, so as not to merely move something unsightly roon the back of the hoose, concrete bunkers were built for these bins.  No siree!  No mere communal refuse area, (i.e. the didgy bin "car park" block you got in the tenement closes), for the in-crowd!

So I`ve tried fledgingly to recreate the bin setup for these houses, as I remember it.  (Sorry about the smallness of this particular photo.  You can find the photos I post here, doctored or otherwise, at Flick`r under ruchazierat2014.  Including this teeny one.  If anyone can resize this, please do).  






As these houses mirrored each others layout, this meant the back and front doors of corresponding neighbours lay beside each other.  This made possible the concrete bin bunkers.   Remember, Craighouse Street had a steep slope.  That`s why the back doors for the houses at the bottom of this row had concrete steps going up to them!  (I`m not sure about the houses at the Milncroft Road end of this block).  With the neighbours` back doors beside each other, any two stairways would rise up to meet in an outside landing.  This was halved by a small wall, about  5 feet high high coming out from the houses, between the two back doors, and heading east, for about 8 feet, where it met the roof of the bin bunker.  Beyond the bunker, at ground level, ran the stick fence.  The bunker was split between 2 corresponding neighbours with an inside segregating wall.  Each resident having their own end.  The bunker was about 10 feet high and about 6 feet by 6, I`d guess.  Very handy for hiding in during hide and seek, (unless the bins inside were crammed full and minging!). Up on top?  Well, some guys might try dribbling with a football.  Good too for sunbathing with deck chairs.  Some guys even tried playing golf, whacking balls off into the park!

However, the poor binmen didn`t have it that easy.  They couldn`t just make a clean sweep of the row.  About halfway along all these Binmens` Pathways, a stick/pole fence cut it off!  No bikes, please.  No skaters!  Or boogies!  (A sort of working class kids predecessor of the Sinclair C5).   Thus, the didgy men must`ve had to go down the back of several houses wheeling out bins, empty and return them, then go back out into the street out front, go down the far end and go through it all again for the other half of each row!  The separating fences/poles didn`t bother us, though.  Just leap right over them.  Only about 4 and a half feet high.  Well, usually.  Sometimes, you might get your lace caught and go flying head-over-ass.  Kiss ta ta to the odd tooth!

I note from the current aerial shot, the bin bunkers are all gone.  And the stairways too!  How do the residents at the bottom end of Craighouse Street get out their back doors?  What did they do to accomodate this during their refurbishment?  Meantime, as the Milncroft Road houses I`ve marked are all on level ground, I don`t believe they ever had concrete bin bunkers like Craighouse Street had.  Likewise, the Craighouse Street row heading west up to meet Elibank Street is on level ground too.  So, no bin bunkers or concrete staircases for them.

Finally, does anyone have any old photos that could illustrate any of the bin areas I`ve marked in this post?  If so, please do post them.  They`d be a damn sight better than that midget mock-up I`ve done!

   
Ruchazie Rat

RUCHAZIE - LOW END - WEST OF CROFTCROIGHN PARK - OTHER BIN AREAS

The previous post, BINMENS PATHWAYS, covered the tucked away narrow back paths that used to run behind the 5 apartments on Craighouse Street/Caprington Street and on Craighouse Street/Milncroft Road, so the "riff-raff" labourers could "service" the gentry of those streets.  The neighbouring tenement blocks, meanwhile, had modern versions of the traditional communal bins similar to the old slums elsewhere in the city.  The layout was, if I recall right, half a dozen steel bins (with lids) housed in purpose-built concrete open-access walk-in "bunkers".  A vague idea is featured below.  This photo is taken from elsewhere on UG, though isn`t of Ruchazie.





Each of the tenement "quads" I`ve lettered featured several "bin bunkers" dotted around their central back courts.



The BROWN LINES reconstruct how BLOCK A used to look.

BLOCK A is Bankend Street (south and east), Gartcraig Road and Milncroft Road.

BLOCK B is Milncroft Road, Elibank Street, Balcombie Street and Gartcraig Road.

BLOCK C is Balcombie Street, Claypotts Road and Avondale Street (north and west).

BLOCK D is Balcombie Street, Elibank Street, Avondale Street and Claypotts Road.

BLOCK E is Craighouse Street, Caprington Street, Drumlochy Road, Elibank Street.

Unfortunately, I`ve been unable to unearth any relevant photos of these bin bunkers from either the time the aerial was taken or before, even featuring neighbouring areas.  But -- who knows? -- perhaps someone may rise to the challenge yet.  As an afterthought, I ask Alex G:  what was the deal behind your neck of the woods?




Your old humble abode, the YELLOW ARROW, along with its`counterpart at the top end of Gartcraig Road, sort of bookmark the row of pensioners houses sandwiched in between.  As the cluster of houses on the top right are modern additions and the M8, behind your house, used to be the Monklands Canal, I`d guess you guys had a similar "closed-off" bin arrangement like the "Park Crowd" along the road because,  just like them, your close proximity to local wildlife (i.e. rats, etc), made this necessary.  Yes?

   
cybers

Images of the old style pre fab bin sheds exist on the forum posted by Hugh Hood there are examples of the flat roof dunny as well as the 3 walled slope roof ones.
Alex Glass

When we moved to Ruchazie in 1967 there were paths between the backcourt drying area and the back garden. So you had two gates per property at the back. When they were building the motorway the backs were redesigned and then altered again later because the layout didn't really work. They moved the bins to the fron of the houses. They should still be there today.
Ruchazie Rat

cybers wrote:
Images of the old style pre fab bin sheds exist on the forum posted by Hugh Hood there are examples of the flat roof dunny as well as the 3 walled slope roof ones.


Thanks.  I`ve checked that out.  The best I`ve managed to find on UG are featured below.  They`re taken from Hugh Hood`s 6 min montage of old Glasgow photos.  Here`s the link.

http://urbanglasgow.co.uk/about3642.html&highlight=hugh+hood

The top photo seems to show a stand-alone midden bunker but I`d guess the tenements around it including its` own, or most of its` own, have been flattened.  Though not of Ruchazie or any of the other new schemes, these photos provide a vague idea of what the "ancestors" looked like of those living in the new schemes were lucky to inherit.  Our updates were brick construction, covered over in a cosmetic coating of white concrete, were more centrally situated, a bit wider, (accomodating 6 - 8 bins), and, I think, were not quite so high.  (Though it`s hard to guess the age of the kid in the bottom photo so as to gauge how high that old midden bunker actually is).





Ruchazie Rat

Alex Glass wrote:
When we moved to Ruchazie in 1967 there were paths between the backcourt drying area and the back garden. So you had two gates per property at the back. When they were building the motorway the backs were redesigned and then altered again later because the layout didn't really work. They moved the bins to the fron of the houses. They should still be there today.


You previously posted these two photos over on hiddenglasgow.co.uk.  They are of/taken from your old back garden on Gartcraig Road and seem to show two of the three "incarnations" of the garden layouts you mention above.  






The bottom one seems to have been taken a little bit further along from the top one, judging by the reference position of the right angled tenement in the background of both.  The bottom one, on the lower left side, sports a mostly out-of-shot small construction.  Was that the closed off bin area (to keep out the river rats) you mention, before they were resited around the front of the houses?

   
cybers

As a point of interest are those railings of Bankend Street above the motorway cutting    I find it slightly worrying and amusing that I have never in 27 years of travelling the M8 noticed those palings before.  Though in my defence i was watching the road.
Fat Cat

Ruchazie Rat wrote:
Alex Glass wrote:
When we moved to Ruchazie in 1967 there were paths between the backcourt drying area and the back garden. So you had two gates per property at the back. When they were building the motorway the backs were redesigned and then altered again later because the layout didn't really work. They moved the bins to the fron of the houses. They should still be there today.


You previously posted these two photos over on hiddenglasgow.co.uk.  They are of/taken from your old back garden on Gartcraig Road and seem to show two of the three "incarnations" of the garden layouts you mention above.  




[url=http://gallery.myff.org/gallery/1772396/Gartcraig+Road+%282%29.jpg]
[/url]

The bottom one seems to have been taken a little bit further along from the top one, judging by the reference position of the right angled tenement in the background of both.  The bottom one, on the lower left side, sports a mostly out-of-shot small construction.  Was that the closed off bin area (to keep out the river rats) you mention, before they were resited around the front of the houses?

   


The garden with the bucket in it was ours.  The guy in the photo was our neighbour,  Mr Munro.   The coal shed (the small structure) survived the renovations carried out when the motorway was built.  Nothing to do with the bins but the cats loved lying up there!  And was a great place for me and my sister to play balls.   Not sure if Alex will remember the air conditioners and secondary glazing that were put in - antiquated even for that time!    The second pic predates the first.  It has the path separating the garden and yard area.
Alex Glass

Oh the white box attached to the wall to help ventilate the house because we were given the secondary glazing. Yeah I remember that. The large windows inside the small windows had a werd lock.

The white box was meant to circulate the air.      

I have some onld family photos I will have a look at to see if they show the actual bins. They did't have a bunker just one tin bin for all the rubbish including the ashes from the fire.

The coal shed was used to store the garden impliments as you only needed half the floor space for the coal.

I brother and I played football in the back using the shed as one goal and the space between the two shared washing like poles as the other goal.

When they moved the bins to the front of the house they built a little area for the bin to be located but it was really just a brick wall.

The back across the road where the tenements were had a bin area which was built like a bunker with viewing portholes. There contained at least six tin bins shared between eight flat if my memory serves me correctly.
Ruchazie Rat

Of course --  the coal sheds!  How easy one forgets!  A quick reminder of what started my preoccupation with bins.  Here`s the back end of the row of fives on Craighouse Street, running off Milncroft Road (out of picture on the left), and heading out of the picture at the top towards Caprington Street.




And, below, a Godawful Fantastic Voyage-sized mock up of said coal shed, as I remember it from my mates` gaff down there.  (A mock up because, as far as I can see from the donor photo I used, John Macdonald`s helicopter shot, they`ve long gone).  I wonder;  that row was sloped and the back doors had stairways leading down to their back gardens.  They seem to have been removed during refurbishment too. How do current residents access their back gardens?





Another look at the Gartcraig Road back garden coal bunker, as already shown further up this page, will do better justice than my Tom Thumb crack at it.






Directly beneath THE YELLOW ARROW, referencing the concrete coal bunker, lies the washing line.  (Is that 2 odd-coloured socks hanging there?!) .   THE GREEN RECTANGLE.  That was the primary school, correct?  It`s long gone.  But what was the name again?  THE RED CIRCLE appears to be some metal construction on the school premises.  Going by the nearby ground-level primary building itself, this object seems to be one-storey higher.  Almost looks like some sort of weird outdoor trampoline!!

And so, the coal bunkers.  Or, to be more precise, the multi-use bin bunkers.  Yep, I remember my mate round on Graighouse Street had his bin in there.  But now I see it served many uses.  Having the valuable coal safely under lock and key for one thing.  And, as Alex says, keeping the garden tools in there too.  Less clutter in the house!  The advantage of having the coal outside the house until needed is primarily the pong it had.  Strong stuff.  I recall the flatbed coal-lorries trawling the schemes.  The man on the back braying "Kaaaaaa-owl!  Kaaaaa-owl!  Kuuumangetcha kaaaaa-owl!".  And they were pretty burly sinewy guys too thanks to all that lugging all those big manky, heavy sacks on and off the lorries and up and down the closes.  Strange.  Back in those days, radiators were practically unheard of.  Unless you were well oiled and rolling in it, since they were few and far between.  Changed days.  Now more widespread, the cost of indoor central`s heating much cheaper.  But not, of course, the actual running costs...  Which is why some people have gone back to... coal fires!  Also, I think some people did have electric fires too, yes?  I mean they must`ve had.  Cos, primarily, the coal fire/fireplace was the main attraction of the living room.  So other rooms must`ve had to rely on small electric fires.  (Convector heaters, I think, were a bit pricey cos they weren`t in widespread use).  So, I wonder.  The closes.  Though having lived in one, I`m a bit lost.  Where did the coal go for us riff-raff not blessed with outdoor sheds/bunkers like the gentry of the 5`s and 3`s?  Were there storage compartments on the landings? I`m definite there weren`t outdoor constructions available cos the communal four-street-square block tenements only had the bin bunkers dotted around their central back courts.  Did us "poor-dos" have to make do with keeping the coal indoors?  A bit iffy, if we did.  Wouldn`t get away with that today, surely.  Health and safety, etc.  I do recall, being young and all, coal was a many splendoured thing.  Not just for fires.  You`d black yourself up with it.  (Nothing racist.  The Black & White Minstrel Show was a big hit on the telly back throughout the 70`s).  But, unlike the mud, where you could give yourself a good clean-up via a catlick before going home late, and thus limit the severity of your "doing" , the coal just sort of got worse if you tried to gob on your finger and wash it off by rubbing.  Only spread it all around onto your nice white t-shirt and everything.  (Persil was very popular back then.  Real bestseller!).  Only a convenient puddle or unlikely sudden drizzle could save the day.  (Or prevent a bigger "doing").

Meantime,  here`s a current aerial of the Gartcraig houses in question.





THE YELLOW ARROWS show that the metal background fences featured in the two main coal shed/bunker pics are still very much standing.  THE BROWN/ORANGE ARROW suggest the possibility that some separating fence between the southern-end two back gardens, a wooden stick fence in Fat Cat`s pic, might still exist today, though maybe in a more robust modern incarnation.  THAT GREEN ARROW.  A big outdoor swimming pool!  My, my.  Ruchazie certainly has gone a bit upmarket since my (70`s) day!  Of course, we hoi-polloi had a much granduer communal swimming pool back then.  It was called the Monklands Canal!      
Fat Cat

The primary was St Giles.
Fat Cat

In the 5s there was a fireplace in the living room and one in the front bedroom at the top of the house.  They were bloody freezing in the winter and sweltering in the summer.  We had a paraffin heater in the bathroom.  It felt like a lotto win when we got central heating.
Alex Glass

Ok here are a few old photos taken from the back garden at 315 Gartcraig Road.

I am not doing the fancy colour arrows so hope they are self explanitory

This is 1967 and you can just make out the tin bin which was very small by todays standards but you need to remember that most people burnt their rubbish so it was mainly ashes in the bin.

C JJ back

Same year and location

C & L 315 Back

A year later same location

Mum S R

Front 1967

315 Gartcraig

Front about 2007 you can see the small wall built to house the relocated bins but by the time the photo was taken the new recyling bins were bigger that the space allocated.

315 Gartcraig Road (1)

315 Gartcraig Road (2)
Alex Glass

Some more views of Ruchazie

M8 Motorway abour 1980

M8 1980

M8 1980 2

M8 2007

M8 Motorway (2)

M8 Motorway (1)

M8 East Date Unknown

M8

M8 East 2007

M8 Motorway (3)

Gartcraig Road 1974

Gartcraig Rd Jun 1974

View of Bankend Street 1974

June 1974 Ruchazie

Field at the rear of Gartcraig Road where the M8 is now

Gang 315
Fat Cat

Jeezo Alex, I remember those wee windows.   My mum hated having to clean them.   Those photos really bring back memories.
Alex Glass

Glad you like them I have had then for a while and wouldnt usually post these family photos but just to illustrate the point about the bins and fortunately there are a couple which actually show the bin.

 
Ruchazie Rat

Alex Glass wrote:
Ok here are a few old photos taken from the back garden at 315 Gartcraig Road.

I am not doing the fancy colour arrows so hope they are self explanitory

This is 1967 and you can just make out the tin bin which was very small by todays standards but you need to remember that most people burnt their rubbish so it was mainly ashes in the bin.


Allow me!




First up, THE RED SQUARES.  Are these concrete air vents, leading to the kitchens inside?  The little steel bin can be as covert as it likes, but the magnifier/zoom-in will always hunt it down in the end.  Gotcha!  There he is...  THE YELLOW CIRCLE.  The refuse bin bullishly takes refuge behind the sanctuary of the wooden-stick fence.  (Why am I suddenly reminded of Patrick McGoohan`s Number 6?!).  (P.S. Were the bin men midgets back in them days?  Or did the "bad old" 70`s slyly pay homage to Victorian days and redirect child chimney sweeps towards the Cleansing Department? ).  THE GREEN ARROW unmasks a hidden gem.  Some old dear, an aunt/grannie/mother sees her chance for a fly guest appearance!

I`ve cropped these two Points Of Interest.  Here they are.  First, the privacy-minded bin.




Next, the more extrovert relative/neighbour.




I`m glad you choose to post these pics, Alex.  It must`ve been a tough call.  Although they primarily capture matters of great personal value, they also carry a priceless secondary value; recording issues of fashion, lifestyle, neighbourhoods, etc.  I particular like the people in this pic.  The smart suit the man wears.  And the hairstyle, clothes, shoes the woman sports.  I`ve always appreciated the "secondary layers" that can be striped from a lot of photos.  The way the person/people/crowd carry themselves, transmits a lot about "the pace of life" of the era it was taken.  (Compare various city centre pics throughout the decades:  they seemed to move briskly in the 70`s, the pedestrians seems bustling from earlier decades).  If a picture paints a thousand words, a lot of that must be down to body language.

Notice the stairs leading DOWN from the back doors to the back gardens.  Not leading straight out at ground level.  Now I know for sure this was indeed the layout round my mates at Craighouse Street.  Obscured by all that dazzling white bed sheet washing on the right, that wall, and the stairs behind, lead down at 45 degrees, right?  And the neighbours stairs, on the pic`s left do the same, though mirror-image wise.

This one below gets across just how big and high them rows of houses were.  In black and white?  Colour was pricey back then.  Film rolls and developing too.  People put thought and effort in each shot.  Had to make them count. (They don`t know they`re living these days.  Digital cameras.  So cheap and simple.  But is there as much of interest to record??)




These two are little gems.




The first, literally, seems to be taken just across from your house.  This shows the bottom most row on Gartcraig Road`s east side.  The family sit on seemingly vacant ground.  I don`t believe anything was ever built here.  So, probably, a green landscape area "baldied" by fitba?  Why is the adjoining grass quadrant, partly visible on the upper left, fenced in (the darker row of sticks) but not this one?




The pic above`s taken about 5 feet further south of the last one, showing the juncture of between the bottom of Gartcraig Road`s east side and Bankhead Street`s south side.  The point-of-overlap would be the small close entrance (with three single vertical windows above) which can be seen directly above the lady in the middle of the back row).  Sadly, the differing subjects of these shots, (while, of course, being the point of the pics), bomb-out a viable photostitch joining these two into a sort of "panorama" ensemble.  Note, at the juncture of where both rows meet, the three wee landings all atop each other!  Little modest balconies leading off living rooms.  The Cranhill high rises are in the distance on the right.  Didn`t you move there from Gartcraig Road, Alex?  Did you ever twig that the many times you looked out your living room windy?!

This one below, the front of your row, 1967, together with the subsequent 2007 follow-up, show pretty conclusively that the refurbishment was no-holds barred.  Presumably inside and out.  Maybe it`s the differing quality of camera lenses over the decades, or maybe latter day planning is so stifling, but everything comes across as much bigger regarding the original layouts.  Houses, gardens, the lot.




Now, this one below.  The fields north of the Monklands Canal. Followed, beneath, by a marked aerial shot.



THE RED SQUARE is the row of houses we see on the right of the actual pic itself.  That`s where Gartcraig Rd, heading north, briefly turns west, opposite Balcombie St, then heads north again to join Gartloch Rd.  And Gartloch Road, though obscured by foilage, is far behind the kids.  That`s a small transit van heading eastwards along Gartloch just above the head of the second-kid-on-the-left sporting the red jumper.  The trees are thus Lethamhill Golf course.  And Gartcraig Place is now right behind them, so that view`s now gone ta-tas.  The kids and snapper must`ve been very near the north bank of the Monklands Canal.  That would now be the north slope of the M8.  (THE TWO YELLOW DOTS in the aerial show where the two family shots were taken with Gartcraig Rd/Gartcraig Rd and Bankhead St in the b.g.).

And the latter day M8.




And there`s that north slope I just mentioned with the old (then derelict) bus garage on the opposite side of the M8.  Yes... the roads were quieter then.  Hard for people to believe nowadays.  But true.  You`ll only see them like that again these days on Christmas day and New Year`s day probably.  Simply less cars back then.  Honest!

And, finally, here`s a wee pressie for Alex making the gesture of sharing his private gems with us.  (It`s taken from this very site and, I`m sure, if Alex had remembered it, he`d posted it last time!). Originally, I thought this was the view out of Alex`s kitchen window after refurbishing of that block.  Now, I think, they added entirely new windows on the actual SIDE of the house at the end of that row.  Like the M8 pic, this shows the bus garage.  In the foreground is a very public pathway.  Charming!  Were those new windows really a boon, then?!



   
Fat Cat

I think yer yellow blobs belong on the other side of the street.  There were 5s around the corner pre motorway, they sat at a 45 degree angle and were demolished to make way for the motorway.   Across from them was grass then the dry bed of the canal.  Looks like the location of the photos.  But Alex will know better.
Ruchazie Rat

Hmmm.  I`ve thought about that.  I still think I`m right.  Here`s a quick amendment to suggest why.  (I`ve added arrows to the YELLOW BLOBS).




The GREEN ARROW points to the closes we see behind the family members in both shots.  The RED ARROW shows the direction the family are looking for both pics.  This applies to both pics as they show (slightly differing sections of) the same closes behind them.  

In the 2nd family pic, (two blokes in blue t-shirts/team tops), the Cranhill high rise flats are visible.  Note: the grassy landscaped expanse the family sit on continues round the corner.  So, (the south side of) Bankhead St also had grassy expanse with concrete linking paths between kerb and closes.  (Same layout as the family pics. Their expanse between the kerb of (the lower east) Gartcraig Rd and its` closes).

Hang on!  I need another amendment!



The linking paths as well as the grassy expanse behind our family continued round the corner and service the Bankhead St closes too. (No linking paths on Bankhead St from kerb to closes. THE YELLOW HOOP shows the tree bush area.  I see no "ghost" linking paths in evidence).

THE ORANGE BLOCKS are the closes for this quadrant.  THE GREEN SQUARES are the two grassy areas in the 1st family pic.  

THE RED SHAPE is the area Fat Cat mentions, sloping down to the Monklands Canal`s north bank.  Check Alex`s M8 shot of this area further up the page.  That sheer vertical wall was cut right into the Canal`s north bank to make way for the M8`s northern lane.  The south lane replaced the actual canal itself.

As a footnote, during a long hot 70`s summer, beehives, (like those legendary pop singers` hairdos), were all over the back court of that quadrant.  Up were the walls met the roofs.  And there was always some loony gang mate eager to bung a shoe/stick its` way.  Never a good idea.  Talk about a bee in a bonnet!  Made the rebel attack on the Death Star look like a nursery spat.  Needed long, strong legs.  Came in handy for running like a b*stard!    
Ruchazie Rat

GARTCRAIG ROAD - BINMENS` PATHWAYS - AERIAL

A quick update.  I thought I`d done the "full skinny" on this theme when I knocked this up for Craighouse Street and Milncroft Road.  But I see now I didn`t complete the idea by including Alex`s block round on the west side of Gartcraig Road.




I think this rounds off that idea as it applied to Ruchazie`s Low End area.  The rest of that area consisted of the (mostly) four square quadrant closes blocks.  And the binmen accessed them simply by going right through the closes into the central back court and carting the bins out of their concrete "bunkers".

I`ve included a bit of guess work for this one.  The DIAGONAL YELLOW LINES are based on what I saw from extreme zoom-ins of the above pic:  there are short diagonal paths clearly visible between these blocks leading out into the front street.  Nowadays, of course, the (big ugly wheelie) bins are located out in the apartments` front gardens.
Ruchazie Rat

RUCHAZIE LOW END - GARTCRAIG ROAD - BINMENS` PATHWAYS - POINTS OF INTEREST

If you revisit the other two pics on this theme posted a few pages back, concerning Craighouse Street and Milncroft Road, you`ll see I make mention of the paths themselves.  This is why Alex`s latest contributions become so important because of their multi-archive value.  I`ve labelled the one below to illustrate the points of interest it has concerning the binmens` pathways.



THE RED ARROW shows the wooden rickety stick fences.  THE GREEN ARROWS show that, though obscured by the hedging and foilage, both sides of the tar binmens` pathway was fenced. THE YELLOW ARROW shows the actual tar path itself.  I`ve cropped and enlarged this area of interest.



The tar path was simply a layer of tar maybe 3 feet wide running round the back of the 3 and 5 apartment block areas of the neighbourhood`s Low End.  These allowed the binmen access to the tenants` bins but, of course, they were primarily there for the tenants` benefit, in terms of immediate access to beyond their back gardens.  I can`t vouch for Gartcraig Road`s apartments but in the Craighouse Street and Milncroft Road set-ups, another short wooden stick fence was slapped between the two main fences running either side of the tar path about halfway along its` course.  This was, I imagine, to deter any chancers up to no good after dark.  It also meant binmen had to empty one half of the bins then go back round to the front of the apartments, all the way along to the far end, then go round to the back of that side.  I bet they loved doing them apartment rows, huh? Of course, it could be they split into two teams and done a pincer movement.

   

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