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James

The River - Discussion Thread

http://urbanglasgow.co.uk/about1403.html


Please keep all comments about The River images in here folks.  




James H
Alex Glass

Wow    

These photos are almost as important as the Gorbals ones. Lots of detail and full of special features like the train being lifted by the Finnieston Crane.

They should be in a book but I am just so happy that we have the privilege of seeing them here.

They just about take your breath away

     
fastnet

What a fantastic collection of pics.

I love the stairway ones and how the stairs all seem worn.

good work fella................        
Becky

That was a fantastic set of pictures. I particularly loved the harbour tunnel ones. I've been fascinated with the two (That I know of) tunnels. I know the pedestrian one at the clyde tunnel is still open, but survival instinct tell me that it would probably be a great idea to NEVER go down it, at least not without a decent sized group of people.

The harbour tunnel is one that I would love to walk through. I imagine there's no exit at the north side because of the casino, but I would be quite happy to double back. Is it still sound? Is it still dry?

I loved the old corpy colours on the Leyland Atlantean which is in the background of the third Carrick shot. I used to love the unique rocking sensation that you felt on the Atlanteans when they were idling. It was the worst thing in the world to be on a bike behind one though!

Peace.
wee minx

Superb pics there , nice to see the Govan Ferry  
Marti



I remember being on this ship and it's revolving dance floor...memories.
Great Set of pictures...again...
Stuball

I'm left almost speechless... thanks so much for posting those photos.

For everyones information, one of those little passnger ferries (no. 12 I think) still exists and spends most of the time tied up behind the Glenlee, coming out every year for the river festival.

And this building...



It's a travesty that such a beautiful building fell fowl of the wreckers ball :(
James

Stuball wrote:
And this building...



It's a travesty that such a beautiful building fell fowl of the wreckers ball :(

It probably caught fire first...



James H
Stuball

Must have been boarded up with no known owners then
LowLight

What an amazing set of pics that is. Well done man.

Really really brilliant.
HollowHorn

My main memory of the old tunnel is one of wooden floors, dampness & the large pipe running along one wall, you can just see it at the bottom of the stairs in one of the photos. I was only through it once or twice. There are a couple of photographs available showing the interior of the tunnel itself but no more than a couple. Your photographs are invaluable. The quality and clarity is outstanding & is IMHO on a par with Marzaroli & Annan & I think that history will judge them to be so. Thank-you very much for these photographs, they are truly astounding.
schiehallion

Brilliant stuff.  People slag the web but one thing it has brought in abundance is the ability to share photos that lie about in boxes or drawers.
samscafeamericain

streapadair, stunning collection and thank you so much.  So many memories.....and it wasn't just drouth sailors that went in to Betty's Bar, cough, cough
glasgowken

Incredible photos  
Fjord

Yet another outstanding set of images streapadair the harbour tunnel pics in particular are quite something.

streapadair wrote:


Anderston Quay. May 1987




Same location but from the opposite angle I took these around a year later in 1988 when the warehouses were being stripped out prior to the new flats being built.  



brotherwalfrid

brilliant pics once again streapadair ,, you`re definately some man
streapadair

Sincere thanks to all who posted in appreciation of the thread.

I've found another half-dozen shots which I've edited into it - all of, on, or around the Finnieston Ferry, so although they're of a fair enough standard they don't cover any new ground, or water, and may not be worth seeking out.
John

Looking back there I realised I didn`t post on this thread...Streapadair ..sometimes I just get carried away looking at the pics and forget to post as I keep going back to look  
Yer too good for yer own good, great set of pics and thanks for sharing
Fjord

Thanks for the new additions much appreciated mate

While on the subject I came across some stunning photographs taken by Stuart Cameron of the Clyde around Glasgow in the early 1980's

click here> River Clyde Collection




Ice bound Waverley at Anderston Quay January 1982 when the river completely froze over in the harsh winter ©Stuart Cameron




©Stuart Cameron

A familiar scene much changed
27stowst

Notice the wear and tear on the steps of the Rotunda??? Thoroughly enjoyed all the pictures. Brilliant. Thanks.  
Stuball

Fjord wrote:


©Stuart Cameron

A familiar scene much changed


She isnt looking too healthy there, is she?
cybers

Aye they shut the Engineers down and stuck in The Sky Park  
The auld doll dont look too healthy either ...
Surprised they aint sunk her yet and shipped her off to Irvine to die  
Stuball

cybers wrote:
Aye they shut the Engineers down and stuck in The Sky Park


Dont you mean The Clydeway Centre?
Lone Groover

Wonderfull collection. This one ...



Looking at the shapes makes me wonder if that was an inspiration for the squiggly bridge ?
cybers

Stuball wrote:
cybers wrote:
Aye they shut the Engineers down and stuck in The Sky Park


Dont you mean The Clydeway Centre?


They changed the name again ?
Stuball

No, it was the Clydeway centre long before it was Skypark. It's still signposted as Clydeway
Alex Glass

Lone Groover wrote:
Wonderfull collection. This one ...



Looking at the shapes makes me wonder if that was an inspiration for the squiggly bridge ?


Nice one LG      
max stafford

Clyde photies!

That last picture is a beauty. I remember having a cruise 'doon the watter' on the Waverley in September 1979 with my mate Gus. The Upper river was still like this with the red sheds at Princes Dock and a big ore carrier at GTQ. I did it the year before too and remember a Greek cruise ship tied up alongside on the south bank too. There was also a big bulk carrier, the Staffordshire up near Yorkhill Quay. I think this was one with a couple of sisters who went deep sea diving in the Pacific a year or two later...!

Smudger.
Alex Glass

Hi Max Stafford (Smudger)    to Urban Glasgow
norrie

Hi Strepadair, more great photos, thanks for sharing them with us.
Bye for now, norrie
Doog Doog

Great pics people!
This is me just getting through some of the threads I've still to look at due
to the vast amount of stuff on here.
AlanM

One of the Waverley from 1975
stillucan

The River

Crivvens!! These river pictures are just great. I was particularly interested in the ferry photos. A few months ago I finished writing about my experiences on the river ferries as a kid and I was amazed that my memories go hand in glove with these photos. The smashed timbers where the ferry would crash into them when docking, the wee capstans bolted to the stairs, the engine room etc - even the rope looped over the helm.  
Beano

AlanM wrote:
One of the Waverley from 1975
AlanM....crackin photo mate    
AlanM

can't take the credit for that one as it was 'borrowed' from a newspaper supplement.
Beano

AlanM wrote:
can't take the credit for that one as it was 'borrowed' from a newspaper supplement.
AlanM.....okay then great scan mate      
stillucan

The River

JUST ANOTHER PUNTER

CHAPTER TWO

  THE RIVER

My mother and I visited my Grandma almost daily. Getting there was great fun as we had to cross the river by ferry. The only bridges across the Clyde were all in the city centre plus two or three to the east.

West of the city centre, all the way to the open sea, the river could only be crossed by boat (with one exception – an almost hidden secret - a rarely used alternative)

Our house, and my Gran’s house, were just about opposite each other, with the river in between. My mental images of our many, many, river crossings are still so vivid, not least because of the atmospheric aura of the Clyde during my childhood.

The awe and excitement I felt then, on and around the river, ensured that I paid full attention to everything that was going on and soaked it all up like a sponge. A little boy agog, you might say.

Even making our making our way down to the ferries was full of interest. The docks and warehouses all around were always busy. Cargo loads were coming and going. Steam engines hauled iron ore along the dockside streets. Iron ore also travelled directly from ships holds up and over the street via a large enclosed (supposedly) conveyor belt. Acrid brown-red dust settled everywhere around the Kingston dock area in particular, like a giant rusty blanket. The road was red, the timber fencing that ran along each side of the road was red, even trees and bushes were red. Not really red – more a kind of rust colour. And the smell! Difficult to describe the smell because nothing else smelled like this. Very strong – almost chokingly so. Maybe like burnt fog. And it stung your eyes as well. It was there at all times – like a perpetual rusty snowfall.

The river had an abundance of pedestrian ferry crossings, giving Glaswegians a choice of around eight different routes, all within a three mile stretch of the river-and more downriver. And at peak times the busiest crossings had two ferries which passed one another midstream.

Added to that were two vehicular ferries, one of which was right at the bottom of our road, Plantation Street, in the Kinning Park district of town, on the south side.

The pedestrian ferry was very basic but it was a hardy wee vessel that was built to last. It was really little more than a converted steel barge with good quality hardwood planking forming the deck surface. Mid-ships was it's a wee engine room, with a chimney or miniature funnel protruding from the top.

Benches ran down both sides of the vessel. They were detachable from the hull of the boat and had rope handles running along their length enabling them to also serve as life rafts if  necessary.

The boat didn’t have a stern but had two bows instead.
A wheelhouse of sorts at each end enabled it to dock in the direction of travel without the need to turn around. Similar to a tramcar.

The helmsman had a special brass key which he used to lock and unlock the wheel, and a short length of rope as a secondary measure to ensure one wheel remained stable while he steered at the other end of the boat.

To board, we had to walk down wet, slippery, open, wooden steps.

All the while, black oily river water gurgled noisily below our feet; frequently splashing up between the planks and over passengers’ shoes. At the same time, blackened timber pilings, which rose high above, and to each side of us, would be swaying and creaking in protest against the pressures they were under from severe bashings from the ferries and the tidal river.

There was always an undignified scramble of passengers to get to the middle of the ferry, where a roofed section offered some shelter from the elements. If you were quick enough to get next to the engine room, you kept your backside warm at the same time.

Large ships literally loomed high above, and over us, as we crept out of the station dock, making me feel like an insect about to be trodden underfoot by a giant from Gulliver’s Travels.

The river was always full of cargo ships, and passenger liners, from every part of the world. There were numerous docks like Prince’s Dock, Queen’s Dock, Kingston Dock. Different docks were tied in with particular shipping lines and destinations like New York, India, South Africa and of course Ireland, which had a daily passenger service from Lancefield Quay.

 It was interesting to  look at their names and where they had come from, conjuring up imaginary and exotic visions of foreign fields, yet to be explored. There were so many of them docked on each side of the river that they had to leave a space between them, to allow the ferries to come and go into their stations. Exactly like the parked cars of today must leave a space for access to driveways. It really was that busy.

On top of all that, the pleasure steamer Queen Mary 11 sailed daily in summertime from the city to the popular tourist towns dotted around the Firth of Clyde. So the job of Ferryman wasn’t as simple as it looked – he had a lot of ducking and diving to do to get us all across without mishap.

On wet and windy days our progress across the river would take the form of a wide arc. This could be disconcerting for all on board, really quite scary. The vessel would be swept further downriver almost as soon as it left it’s station. At times I felt we would be swept away and never seen again. Then the engine would take on an altogether different tone, apparently straining against and defying the elements. The bow would come round and we would slowly but surely close the gap between us and the opposite station.

On approaching the other side of the river, the helmsman would aim the ferry at it’s berth between the timber pilings and ram it directly up quite a number of the steps, then leap off and tie her up to a little capstan bolted to the timber steps. If you were a regular you instinctively grabbed hold of something, or planted your feet wide apart in readiness, just before the almighty crash, bang, wallop, up the steps began.

Those not in the know had to fight to remain upright and sometimes failed ignominiously. On occasions when the docking process was just a little off-centre we would collide violently with the high timber pilings to the side and bounce off them prior to further bouncing up the steps.

My selective memory only ever visualises the weather conditions as being dark, dismal, wet, foggy and cold. Seemingly impenetrable. Alarmingly reminiscent of movie scenes from Jack the Ripper or The Hounds of the Baskervilles with swirling all encompassing smog. A constant drizzly rain that found it’s way into every nook and cranny – despite your best efforts to keep it at bay. It would get in at your neck and make it’s way under your oxters and down between your buttocks. Then the wet would work it’s magic and freeze your skin to your bones. And when it dried you were left with an itchy rash where the sun don’t shine. And they wonder why Scots don’t live so long?  

I’m sure there were some nice days …but they obviously didn’t leave an impression. The result of all this was the creation of an unique, rather foreboding, atmospheric bubble in your mind - which only burst and evaporated on safely reaching the sane sanctuary at the top of the stairs on the other side.
The sighs of relief were audible and men would suddenly start whistling as they emerged on to the cobbled streets above.

When my sister Alice was born – 2nd Dec 1949 – I was three - we had to start using the impossibly large and bizarre looking vehicular ferry thanks to her equally impossibly large pram which was akin to a queen-size bed on wheels. The inside of the pram looked positively luxurious. All wall-to-wall cream padded upholstery, and a fancy hood. Two big silver springs either side supported the pram body on four great wheels with white-wall tyres.

The state-of-the-art suspension ensured the baby wasn’t tossed around too much on cobbled streets and would hopefully keep her quiet. (something that proved infinitely more difficult in her later years) The outside surface of her pram was shiny black – like a limo – with a scrolled white name on the sides. I don’t recall the name, but probably something grand-sounding like Empress or Buckingham or some such. Horse drawn carts, lorries, cars, motorbikes, all trundled aboard as directed by a ferryman. Finally, we would get the signal to board which I always felt we did rather regally. Each trip was an adventure for me .

All the ferry crews had an air of efficiency about them. None more so than the vehicular ferry with all the comings and goings of traffic. Keeping the wheels of commerce turning and all that. They were all employed by The Clyde Navigation Trust and were smartly dressed in navy blue uniforms complete with shiny brass buttons and peaked caps.

The mechanics of the vehicle deck mesmerised me. My Dad had tried to explain it’s intricacies to me. And it’s something that has stuck in my mind.

Essentially, there were two decks, the lower fixed deck carried all the heavy engineering, electrical, and winch equipment required for its operation. This gear was clearly visible as the ferry made the crossings but not when you were standing on the upper deck. It covered the same area in size as the one below it, but was usually something like 20 to 25 feet higher up, with nothing but fresh air in between (except structural steel) It carried the vehicles and passengers. It could rise and fall, by means of  steam driven gears and winches.

The deck was maneuvered in sync with the varying river levels and street levels on both sides of the river. Vehicles rolled on one side, and off the other, over an enormous steel, hinged ramp – which clattered down onto the street,  leaving no one in any doubt that the ferry had arrived.

The wheelhouse was positioned another 20 feet, way above the vehicle deck, slap bang in the centre of the ferry. It was supported on an arched steel gantry which had access ladders on each side of the vessel. A funnel on each side - like two cigarettes stood on end- ran up from the keel to the height of the wheelhouse – completing the decidedly quirky look. The Clyde Vehicular Ferry was as eccentric looking on the water, as the Penny Farthing bicycle must have looked on the road. But it worked -  most of the time - in windy conditions it was laid up, tied firmly to the dock. It couldn’t hold a candle to it’s tough wee cousin – the pedestrian ferry.

There was also a third crossing at exactly the same spot as our local “wee ferry” and “big ferry”. It was a tunnel. My father took me through it from time to time just for the hell of it. Because it was there. Many years later I took some friends through with our bikes. They didn’t believe me when I said we were going through the Clyde Tunnel. What Clyde tunnel?

The tunnel actually consisted of three tunnels of similar diameters, bored alongside each other. Two were for one-way horse and cart traffic – the third, central one, for pedestrians. Both ends of the tunnel, at Finnieston and Plantation, were dominated by two large red-brick rotundas with glass roofs and windows all round. Inside the rotundas the infrastructure for hydraulic elevators was still in evidence. These were the means of lowering and raising horses and carts. A very long staircase had to be negotiated by pedestrians.

Once down there it became apparent why it was seldom used. It was an unpleasant experience for most, I suppose - but as usual I quite liked it. It was different; and it presented a challenge to a youngster. It was basically a big tube, about the size of the Glasgow Subway tunnels. It was very dimly lit and some of the lights flickered on and off frequently – at the same time making that buzz...buzz electrical humming sound. It was always wet with water running down the once-white tiled walls. Of course, everybody’s first reaction was that the Clyde was trying to get in through cracks in the structure. We would all die a horrible death by drowning as the waters rose above our heads before we could reach the other side. Or go up like a wee blue light when the water came into contact with the faulty electric lighting.

A large black water pipe ran the length of the tunnel at waist height, taking up a fair proportion of it’s width. The pipe was also soaking wet and dripping onto the duckboards underfoot. All this water was due, mostly, to condensation, the result of no heat or throughput of air, combined with rainwater getting in via broken windows in the rotunda.

But it was also true that the water pipe leaked like a sieve through it’s numerous flanged joints. It was well into the late 1970’s or early 80’s before the tunnel was finally closed to foot traffic, bringing it’s use to a sad, but timely end - considering it’s condition by then.
It had lasted nigh on 100 years.
the researcher

ferry/tunnel photos

nice to see photos of the ferry and the tunnel
my granny stayed at shields road and when i stayed for a week during the holidays me and my cousin and his two pals used to go across on the ferry and come back through the tunnel and as has been said was spooky with the water dripping and the smell of pigeons
also many of the ferry men were highland people i recall one of the crew members having a conversation with a woman in gealic
i didnt go on the ferry very often though but can remember it mounting the steps as it came in and a crew member jumping off and tieing up the boat
there were two wheel houses and rudders and at the end not being used the wheel was locked to stop the rudder from moving
growler

Re: ferry/tunnel photos

the researcher wrote:
nice to see photos of the ferry and the tunnel
my granny stayed at shields road and when i stayed for a week during the holidays me and my cousin and his two pals used to go across on the ferry and come back through the tunnel and as has been said was spooky with the water dripping and the smell of pigeons
also many of the ferry men were highland people i recall one of the crew members having a conversation with a woman in gealic
i didnt go on the ferry very often though but can remember it mounting the steps as it came in and a crew member jumping off and tieing up the boat
there were two wheel houses and rudders and at the end not being used the wheel was locked to stop the rudder from moving


When i met my wife she stayed in Anderston and i stayed in the Gorbals, we used to walk along and get the Anderston ferry, i would walk her home and then get the ferry back to the Plantation and walk home, at that time the clyde still had plenty of traffic on it, i took the ferry that much that one day the old guy asked me if i would like to steer it i said no probs but  it  was harder than i thought and he duly took over   but wonderful memories. To me it dosent seem that long ago but it was 42 yrs ago   time flies when your enjoying youself.  
Tosh

Lone Groover wrote:
Wonderfull collection. This one ...



Looking at the shapes makes me wonder if that was an inspiration for the squiggly bridge ?


I love this picture, i'd like it framed and on the wall  
streapadair

Tosh wrote:


I love this picture, i'd like it framed and on the wall  


Seriously? I can email you a hi-res version if you want.
Tosh

streapadair wrote:


Seriously? I can email you a hi-res version if you want.


That would be great Streapadair, i'll pm you my email addy thanks pal :)
Gina



*EDIT* This is actually one of Streapadair's pictures.

I hope you don't mind but I've made a print of this pic as my dad used to work in the Co-op in the early 70's. He's been gone over 7 years now but this picture brings back happy memories.

Thanks x
alanmo

Excellent picture Gina.
Gina

alanmo wrote:
Excellent picture Gina.


The picture is one of Streapadair's. Sorry for not making that clear.
Beano

Gina wrote:

my dad used to work in the Co-op in the early 70's. He's been gone over 7 years now but this picture brings back happy memories.

Thanks x


Gina....I worked in UCBS between 1968-1972 was your dad a baker.
Gina

Yes, he worked in a few bakeries including Milanda in Wesleyan St, Dunns in Abercromby St, Beatties in Paton street, UCBS and eventually Bilslands in Hydepark St till we moved to Livingston in 1977.

He used to talk about walking over a suspension bridge to get to work and I had visions of something like the Golden Gate Bridge!!
streapadair

Hi Gina, you're very welcome.

I always liked that photo too, lovely bridge that's still there, spectacular building that sadly isn't.

I remember the burly man had a child by the hand and was giving him (very loud) dog's abuse, which is why the couple coming the other way look a bit concerned.
Beano

Gina wrote:
Yes, he worked in a few bakeries including Milanda in Wesleyan St, Dunns in Abercromby St, Beatties in Paton street, UCBS and eventually Bilslands in Hydepark St till we moved to Livingston in 1977.

He used to talk about walking over a suspension bridge to get to work and I had visions of something like the Golden Gate Bridge!!

Hi Gina.. I also worked in Milanda and Bilslands our paths may have crossed at some time, my condolences and sorry to read he passed away.
Vinny the Mackem

streapadair wrote:
Hi Gina, you're very welcome.

I always liked that photo too, lovely bridge that's still there, spectacular building that sadly isn't.

I remember the burly man had a child by the hand and was giving him (very loud) dog's abuse, which is why the couple coming the other way look a bit concerned.


Hang on .. is that someone sitting on the edge of the bridge?
cybers

Vinny the Mackem wrote:


Hang on .. is that someone sitting on the edge of the bridge?


Yup on the days before elf n safety   when not everyone sitting on the edge of a bridge was a jumper and in times when most of them should have been.
Vinny the Mackem

How times have changed! You'd have plod, social workers and psychiatrists all over that these days!
cybers

As well as a council guy with a clip board doing risk assessment before letting any of them any where near the bridge. Then there would be thier own internal H&S audit to assess the suitability of the situation and awe fuckit she jumped !!!
Steve Mc

The pics of the Cyde tunnel brought back memories of when I had the job of replacing the light bulbs in the pedestrian tunnel , the one in which the big water pipe fills half the space. The "ghosts " may be the moisture condensing out of the air .it was always damp and the temperature changed as you went down the steps.  In those days both Rotundas were wrecks and birds and bats and assorted creatures nested in them.  I also remember the job ,on the ferries , of changing the car battery which powered the navigation light. It may be of interest to know that there is another tunnel , more modern, down river of the Southern General Hospital , which also has a great big water pipe running through it it can be walked along but has never been for the general public like the rotunda tunnel.  I have never seen the horse and cart lift used which fed the lower tunnel under the pedestrian one . Before my time !
Stuball

Steve Mc wrote:
It may be of interest to know that there is another tunnel , more modern, down river of the Southern General Hospital , which also has a great big water pipe running through it it can be walked along but has never been for the general public like the rotunda tunnel.


This will be the tunnel that Scottish Water are interested in but have had trouble locating
Tom Manley

Glasgow Shots

What a great selection of shots!.. The United Cooperative Banking Society building with its somewhat eccentric style, perhaps was influenced by Templeton Carpet Factory? Some great shots of the Govan and Finnieston ferries... How the area changes... Zaha Hadid's  Riverside Museum is a great testament to where once ships, sheds and sails loomed. Hope the other side of the water gets the much needed revival it needs.... Some shots of Govan  here on my website... and some fantastic Glasgow images by Hugh Hood
Tom Carreyette

A most interesting set. I remember some of the ships and have info that may help to identify them. The ore carrier VICTORE (a bit of a pun in her name) was a regular visitor in the 70s, built at Sunderland in 1963 for the London-Greek owners Mavroleon Brothers. The iron ore brought upriver to General Terminus was discharged by the large grab cranes into rail wagons for transportation to Ravenscraig steelworks.

The summer 1960 shots of Harland & Wolff, Govan show some of the series of 5 general cargo ships they built for the British India Steam Navigation Co, in various stages of construction. Their launch dates were as follows: BULIMBA 25/9/58; BANKURA 22/1/59; BARPETA 10/3/60; BAMORA 6/9/60; BOMBALA 29/3/61. So the view in Govan basin fitting out together with DAGHESTAN (launched 25/5/60) is most likely BARPETA, as she is in a more advanced state of outfitting. Your view 'on the stocks' is likely to be BAMORA if it is the same time. The vessel just started on the building berth with only a few frames showing may well be BOMBALA.

Your shot from the small CPA ferry set taken 16/3/77 with a passing bunker barge has a unique and unmistakable ship in the distance. Under the Stobcross Crane (also known as 'Finnieston Crane') is the Dutch heavy lift vessel GLORIA SIDERUM. What makes her so unusual is that she was constructed from two existing small ships joined together abreast, by fitting a new deck connecting them. A gap was left between, making her a catamaran and creating a large working deck area. This created a stable lifting platform but also a self-propelled seagoing vessel with ship shape hulls.

I don't remember when it was that CARRICK took the heavy list in your photos. In one shot we see the Wee Manns pub, later better known as the Clutha Vaults and finally just the Clutha, so tragically destroyed by the helicopter crash just over a year ago.

The CALEDONIAN PRINCESS built at Denny's of Dumbarton in 1961 used to operate on the Stranraer to Larne service for British Rail. By the time she was a floating club in Glasgow she was marketed as TUXEDO PRINCESS. She used to attract some pretty rough characters. She also served the same purpose on the Tyne at Newcastle for a while before she was replaced there by another ex BR / Sealink cross-channel ferry, DOVER. In your picture it is good to see a clear view to the CPA building before the Atlantic Quay development at the Broomielaw.

Lots of superb photos. Thanks. That's why I've just joined the forum!
cybers

Great informative first post Tom and Welcome  
norrie

Welcome to Urban Glasgow Tom, I am sure I have taken a shot of Tuxedo Princess and posted it on UG
streapadair

Hi Tom, wonderful information and many thanks for taking the trouble to post it. Welcome to the forum.

Tom Carreyette wrote:
Your view 'on the stocks' is likely to be BAMORA if it is the same time.

Yes, all the shipyard photos are from the same day, probably within a few minutes of each other in fact.

Quote:
I don't remember when it was that CARRICK took the heavy list in your photos.

I've tracked down the date of this (Google news archive) and had been meaning to post it. The Herald reported on Thursday Jan.12 1978 that it had happened the previous night. Explanation given was that an exceptionally low tide had caused the bulwarks which kept the vessel away from the quay wall to slip, and the subsequent high tide left her at that exotic angle. The damage was considerable.
streapadair

Steve Mc wrote:
The pics of the Cyde tunnel brought back memories of when I had the job of replacing the light bulbs in the pedestrian tunnel


Hi Steve, welcome to the forum. Handyman in the tunnel and on the ferries, sounds like an interesting job? Who were you working for, the CPA?
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