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Ruchazie Rat

Tickets, please! Buses, trains, ferries and planes!

Anyone got old public transport tickets they can post so we can all jump aboard for a trip down memory lane?

I remember growing up, back in the 70`s, getting on the 35 bus into town and the conductor, with that big heavy ticketeer hanging round him, would wind out your ticket after tossing your money in his big heavy leather pouch.  The little square tickets, I`m sure, were all different colours.  But why?  I recall the price being stamped on them.  Did the conductor do that via the machine for every individual sale?  (Cos the price, slap in the middle in wet purple print, always seemed fresh).  Or were there separate “ticket cylinders” on his machine for each fare stage?

And do you remember the original Transcard Centre in St. Vincent Street?  And how badly they underestimated its` limited capacity when the Transcard became very popular?  Always seemed crowded.  Remember those photo booths were they took your photo?  (No using previous photos.  No, Sir.  Might get up to no good.  Like a bit of fraud or something.  Bit ghastly.  Like getting your passport photo taken).  When the modernized subway was opened, they chucked in that little yellow ticket as part of the Transcard, with the brown magnetic strip on the back.  (And some one or others` big brother would always be telling you how “them uni sience swots” know how to keep swiping the ticket and recoding it so they can use it forever!).

But maybe I`m getting ahead of myself.  Maybe the humble Transcard deserves a piece all on its` own?
kev

You should find everything you need here
http://glasgowtransport.co.uk/gct1.html
Ruchazie Rat

Many thanks.  Wonderful to see all those tickets, uniforms, even rule books!  Forgotten how, at start of 80`s, all the trains, subway cars, and buses were orange colour-co-ordinated!
Alex Glass

Which part of Ruchazie did you live Ruchazie Rat?

Do you remember the Alexander Buses that left from Dundas Street Bus Station. If memory serves me it was the 1A the 1B and the 1C going to Garthamlock and never picked up passengers before or after they got to Ruchazie.

There was also a special school weekly ticket you could buy.
Fat Cat

Used to get the 35 to school.  Caught the bus just outside Gartcraig Garage.   I remember a wee guy stood outside selling the paper.
Ruchazie Rat

Alex Glass:   Posted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 6:24 pm
Which part of Ruchazie did you live Ruchazie Rat?


Not to far off Croftcroighn Park.  Went to St Philps Primary.  (There was a kind of class "hut", built west side of the north playground, and we went in there a lot of times.  The teacher was some english guy.  A Mr Reece, I think.  Looked a bit like that guy Trevor Bannister from Are You Being served, who died last year).

Got the 35 while going into town just outside the garage.  Loved going to the old Buchanan Street bus station for journey back home, (where the Buchanan Galleries now stand).  Those SMT "squashed-faced" old Red and White double-deckers were great.  All crushed into those "island platforms".  They used to growl and tremble waiting to pull out.  And the seats were so incredibly firm.  Not like the shitty quicksand saggy-arsed ones on todays buses.  (Checkout scotlandonscreen.co.uk.  Jagz posted a link on urbanglasgow to this site: Glasgow 1962.  This will take you to s-o-s and show you the 12 educational moviereel "Glasgow-Portrait of a city early 1960`s".  On this, you`ll see Glasgow Cross teeming with these buses and pedestrians.  My mate said the city looked so vibrant back then.  Exactly!  Watch too The Empire Exhibtion 1938 and, fancy a laugh?, try typing "Dalek in Ingram St" into the search box!).

Google Balcombie Street, Ruchazie and you`ll get a black and white photo of a family outside their tenement about 40/50 years ago.  (I think of them as "tenements", sort of new modern ones when they were built, mind.  Sadly, they`re all gone now.  And they were only threw up around the 50`s!) Walkaround with the google`s 3d streetwalk, and you`ll see those streets now, Drumlochy Road, Milncroft Rd, Gartcgraig Rd, Eilbank Street, they`re all nice little (private?) semis now by the look of them.  Sad.  Cos, if that`s the case, the neighbourhood has been seriously downsized.

Pity...

Go to Glasgow Guides Forum Boards and look under the heading "neighbourhoods".  You`ll find several people reminiscing about life there over the past 50 years under the "Ruchazie" listing.  Don`t forget to polish those rose-tinted specs!  Enjoy!
Fat Cat

Ruchazie is the same dump, different houses.  Housing associations build new homes and put the same tramps into them that messed up the old ones!  Ruchazie used to be full of working class decent folk, now it's full of, well, take your pick.
Targer

I like your post Fat Cat and what you say is what happened in other schemes eg Arden.
cybers

Glasgow as a whole has had loads of hard working decent folk living alongside rogues and robbers. The city is not alone in its make up and shares it's history with almost all cities in the U.K.

Glasgow made the headlines for all the wrong reasons and unfortunately that's the memories that carry forward despite all the other good things that the city has done.

To throw a different slant on this though.
Those same rogues and vagabonds lived in harmony with the working class folk of the scheme as it was a "we are all in the same shitty boat" camaraderie whereas these Junkie bastards dont care if they rob their own maw to get what they want.
tombro

Well said, Cybers, and it's the same the world over.  People who care for each other look after each other while those who don't care look after themselves in any way possible !

Tombro    
sputnik

bang on the money cybers.that telly programme about manchester lawyers is full of these rats who have the bloody cheek to blame all and sundry to try and justify their actions.
mani

cybers wrote:
Glasgow as a whole has had loads of hard working decent folk living alongside rogues and robbers. The city is not alone in its make up and shares it's history with almost all cities in the U.K.

Glasgow made the headlines for all the wrong reasons and unfortunately that's the memories that carry forward despite all the other good things that the city has done.

To throw a different slant on this though.
Those same rogues and vagabonds lived in harmony with the working class folk of the scheme as it was a "we are all in the same shitty boat" camaraderie whereas these Junkie bastards dont care if they rob their own maw to get what they want.

i could not have put it better myself .
TT

As a quick comment on the Ruchazie of yesteryear, I can only say that - when it was newly built in the early 1950s - it was a Paradise compared to what most of the tenants had come from.  Inside toilets, separate cooking areas, enough bedrooms for everybody - and plenty of green space all around. Things that people simply take for granted nowadays.

To get back to the actual topic about city transport, it was the Corpy bus tickets that had the different colours, which denoted different price ranges.  The SMT tickets were simply white, with the price and other information stamped on them by the machine - which was an entirely different type of machine from the Corpy clippie's machine.
When I lived in Ruchazie, in the early to mid 1950s, my eldest sister worked as a clippie on the trams for a few months.  When she was training, she got her machine and sample rolls of tickets home to practise with, and I used to sit on a chair in the living room pretending to be a passenger, while she took my fare.  What always fascinated me at the time though was the whistle they used to issue the clippies with.  As a seven or eight year old, I would have loved to have one of my own, but my sister had to hand it back along with her uniform and ticket machine when she moved on to another job.
Fat Cat

TT wrote:
As a quick comment on the Ruchazie of yesteryear, I can only say that - when it was newly built in the early 1950s - it was a Paradise compared to what most of the tenants had come from.  Inside toilets, separate cooking areas, enough bedrooms for everybody - and plenty of green space all around. Things that people simply take for granted nowadays.



This is correct.   But nowadays it's awful.  And what a shame.  Near to Hogganfield Loch, near to a great golf course, nearby transport links.   Should be a highly desirable place to live, not somewhere you want to move from ASAP.
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