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Doorstop

Urban Glasgow Movie Critique









This iteration of John Le Carré’s 1974 Cold War spy novel ‘Tinker Tailor Solider Spy’ has the twin shadows of the book and TV series hanging over it. This may sound like a bad thing but I can assure you, it's not.

I, personally have never afforded myself the privilege of reading the tome - but was 'forced' to sit through the TV series as a child as my parents watched it. I may have fawned indifference (as was fashionable in the punk era, for all things parental), but, if I'm completely honest, I avidly awaited the next episode. Just disguised my zeal with all the skill afforeded by Mssr Smiley and his ilk.

George Smiley .. as any damn fool should realise .. is the main protagonist in this cinematic adventure .. now played by Gary Oldman, lately much-missed by serious cinema – a British spy so colourless and dissimilar to James Bond that he would fit more comfortably in the tea rooms of a provincial railway station than on a tropical beach or in a sports vehicle, firing ordnance most unpleasant.

The tale is more or less as Le Carré delivered as same, give or take the odd piece of judicious tinkering to fit in with the contemporary politic – Hong Kong becomes Istanbul, for one, and Czechoslovakia is now Hungary. But the gist is still the same.

A well-connected civil servant, hushed, circumspect and clandestine Oliver Lacon (Simon McBurney), recruits Smiley and an assistant, the younger spy Peter Guillam (Benedict Cumberbatch, erstwhile known as 'Watson' to Smiley’s 'Sherlock'), to decode which of his ex-colleagues is a disaterously suceesful mole, passing secrets to the Russians. Others are starting to believe what Smiley’s old boss Control (John Hurt) had long suspected before his ousting from the service following a bungled operation by taciturn, hard-as-nails spy Jim Prideaux (Mark Strong) in Budapest: "there’s a ‘rotten apple’ at the top of the service."

Swedish director Tomas Alfredson (‘Let the Right One In’ .. a cinamatic experience I CANNOT recommend highly enough!!) blows a fresh air of continental style into Le Carré’s story without harming the 1970s British period feel of his source material. There’s a touch of ‘The Ipcress File’ to his ‘Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy’ in the playing and, trust me, in that there is no bad thing.

Oldman’s Smiley – more haggard, sinister and silent than the assignment afforded by Guinness but with enough of a hint of the great man’s gravitas, *more* than pulls the task off with enough momentum to match the great mans initial performance .. I won't say he surpasses it, because I would be lying, in my humble opinion .. Guinness was insurpassable and insurmountable as an object to be circumvented in his portrayal of Smiley. A hard act to equal, let alone outdo.

But still .. this is a world of dusty files, clapped-out caravans and remote prep schools .. at times you need your wits about you to keep up with a tangled, interleaved web of a plot, and prior knowledge of the book or TV series certainly smooths the ride.

Not "entirely" necessary, but definitely recommended, to extract the most enjoyment from what's on offer .. as is the case with the majority of ports from the written to the celluloid .. in my opinion anyway.

Naturally, some episodes (instances) from the book and TV series don’t make it into the film, but it’s remarkable how much remains, often secured by a sly glance here or quick image there, which in itself adds to the enjoyment of the viewing experience.

This spy story, as it was always intended to be, is all about the journey – the process – and the backwaters and b-roads of the route, not the grand finale. This film’s superb cast, script and direction threaten to make that journey equally as thrilling as Le Carré’s book.

And that's something I never thought I'd say of a remake of something so complicated, convoluted and involved.

Marks out of ten?

12.
cybers

I went to see this knowing the series and the book and was shocked by the low score from the media on this movie.
I thought Gary Oldman has been long overlooked as a serious actor and sat through this totally engrossed.
If i am fair I would say the book still has something to offer to those who have not read it but all in in all i fully agree with the 12/10 rating you have issued.
Hawick_1987

It's on my list this year, along with populist films 'Senna' and 'The Iron Lady.' Giving '14-18' a go on the recommendation of Empire.
Doorstop

cybers wrote:
I went to see this knowing the series and the book and was shocked by the low score from the media on this movie.
I thought Gary Oldman has been long overlooked as a serious actor and sat through this totally engrossed.
If i am fair I would say the book still has something to offer to those who have not read it but all in in all i fully agree with the 12/10 rating you have issued.


This.
norrie

I enjoyed Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, I thought I would find it dry, even my wife enjoyed it

Try and see The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, War Horse, Mission Impossible, we enjoyed all of them
fastnet

norrie wrote:
I enjoyed Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, I thought I would find it dry, even my wife enjoyed it

Try and see The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, War Horse, Mission Impossible, we enjoyed all of them


I thought tinker tailor was a bit complicated but it got there in the end.

Mission impossible was good as well.

Bridesmaids was fun and drive was slow but got going when the violence started...

Tower heist and devils double are on my to do list.
Doorstop





I have just watched the "Excision" celluloid rendition.

I know I usually write a detailed précis of any movie I feel to be of merit .. but this movie is so very, very gravimetcally magnetic, whilst simultaneously being SO wrong, I feel I can't delve into the heart of where it comes from without damaging myself.

A *truly* disturbing movie .. in every sense .. and, given my disposition, I feel I can watch most things and not feel it surpasses what goes on inside my own head.

This movie does that and more .. truly wrong.

Cinematically superb, casting - brilliant -  character acting may seem wooden (from the main protagonists) initially, but when you realise the subject matter and where it comes from and where it's going you'll see it is perfectly suited.

I actually had to watch this movie in three goes, it was so disturbing .. and coming from me - that's saying something.

There are no big names ( bar Malcolm McDowell) in the cast, but don't let that put you off .. the movie is compelling .. in the same way that looking at a decapitated road crash victim is.

Difficult to look at .. hard to look away from.

This may well deserve to be in the movie thread .. but the search faci!ity in this place is so sh!t I cant find the cnut.
cybers

sounds interesting mate will look it up this very instant  

Oh and is this YOUR thread your looking for
http://urbanglasgow.co.uk/about2843.html&highlight=movie
Doorstop

Mate .. it's PROPER weird.

be warned.
fastnet

Lawless.

If you like Boardwalk Empire then you will like this.
Hawick_1987

fastnet wrote:
Lawless.

If you like Boardwalk Empire then you will like this.


I'm hooked on Boardwalk mate, I'll give it a bash if it's as good!
fastnet

Hawick_1987 wrote:
fastnet wrote:
Lawless.

If you like Boardwalk Empire then you will like this.


I'm hooked on Boardwalk mate, I'll give it a bash if it's as good!


I should have said if you like Boardwalk moonshine fight scenes...
Doorstop




[img]https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSomuQXa7J3TTeDDDi2Vi0yniEalYfsHyyDpx7Ve2i9xMvYuaUC[/img]


I stumbled across this movie by accident last week, and having a bit of a bad day yesterday, decided to hunker down and watch what I thought was a thriller but which actually turned out to be deep and thoroughly compelling character study of a functioning alchoholic, and his personal journey in coming to terms with the misery his addictions have afflicted upon him and those he loves.

Denzel Washington stars as a self denying high functioning alcoholic pilot who pulls off a skillful rescue of his doomed aircraft after a catastrophic mechanical failure.

But no sooner is Captain "Whip" Whitaker (Washington) branded a "Captain Sully" ( of Hudson River splashdown fame) -style hero by the media than the investigations into the cause of the crash threaten to not only derail his career, but also send him to jail as the extent of his drink and drug problems not only become increasingly apparent to those around him who both respect him, or hold him in contempt, dependant on the depth of their personal knowledge of his substance abuse demons .. but to Washington's character himself as the realisation dawns that his issues have him under control and not, as most addicts presume, the contrary.

The film doesn't break any new ground in the 'struggles of an alcoholic'  genre. Indeed, quite often, it reverts to formulaic cliché but, as events progress, the film springs to life when Washington is interacting with Don Cheadle (his union attorney) and Bruce Greenwood (as a longtime friend who is in a professional position to help him).  

By way and by far though, the standout performer in this movie was by John Goodman as Whip's good ol' boy/hippie drug dealer.

Goodman steals all his scenes and his character shifts the tone of this otherwise heavy drama into oddly comedic territory.

The effect is one of a well delivered hugely mixed message to send in a film about a pilot fucked up on booze and coke at the time of a fatal crash. "Flight" makes you never want to touch another drop of booze, but it makes cocaine seem like the greatest pick-me up ever.

English actress Kelly Reilly (best known as Dr. Watson's wife in the Sherlock Holmes movies) makes an appearance in events, playing Nicole, a recovering junkie who begins a relationship with Whip. She gives a fine performance in a somewhat one-note role and never quite generates much heat or chemistry with Washington in their many scenes together.

This movie, for the most part, is buoyed up by Washington, who is his usual reliably great self. But there are a few false notes and actory tics in his performance, such as never being that convincing when "drunk", which I found to be somewhat disconcerting which, along with the disconnected premise of an investigative thriller type movie actually turning into an evangelical advert for AA prevented me from fully connecting with the screenplay.

Still, all in all, thoroughly watch-able. (7/10)
norrie

Hi Doorstop, I have seen the trailers  and thought it looked good
Whats the film called?

A good report, I really must do better when submitting  mine

I tend to look for the official stuff and post that, then add my own thoughts
Doorstop

I don't know why the images aren't showing Norrie .. the movie is titled "Flight"
cybers

The encryption on IMDB changes weekly mate so direct links to images wont hold ....
norrie

Hi Doorstep, Ok I remember now
fastnet

Just watched Argo............Great movie.

Django unchained was also good but a bit gory if you like that kind of thing.

Lincoln is next on my list.
cheesylion

fastnet wrote:
Lincoln is next on my list.


Quite fancied Lincoln until I saw the trailer, D.D.L. sounds like 'Grampa Simpson' in it so don't think I could get into it!
fastnet

   

I'm going to watch that thinking of grandpa........They both are called Abe as well..
norrie

Zero Dark Thirty

Hi guys, Claire and I went to see this film today, we enjoyed it
It held our attention all way through to the end




From the team behind ‘The Hurt Locker’, ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ follows the 10-year US quest to find Osama bin Laden.

Starring Chris Pratt (Moneyball), the film details the operation to bring the world’s most wanted man to justice, from the early stages of the hunt to the special ops mission that culminated in his death at the hands of SEAL Team Six in 2011.

‘Zero Dark Thirty’ also stars Jessica Chastain (The Help) and Joel Edgerton (Warrior).
Doorstop





I stumbled across this excellent wee movie quite by accident and took a chance on viewing, even though I'd heard absolutely nothing about it on my usual movie review sites.

It's a nominally sci-fi drama, set in the not too distant future (think one or two Apple new product launches away) when Frank Langell, a retired cat burlglar with a craggy and spiky demeanour, begins to show signs of a faltering memory due to encroaching Alzheimers. He lives alone, in an increasingly messy home, eating cereal for main meals and generally neglecting himself. His son is shocked at the degeneration in his father and, after a home visit, beginning to resent Frank for taking time away from his own young family, decides that what is needed is the next big thing in houshold automation - an ASIMO like caretaker robot to take care of the day to day running of the house (and unbeknonst to Frank, programmed with an artificial intelligence matrix that adapts to Franks actions to set out activities to keep Franks' mind active) .. his only other cerebral activity is to make his way to the local library, not so much for books to read (although he does) but to flirt with the object of his affections, the librarian, Susan Sarandon.

Naturally, Frank hates the machine with a vengeance as much as the healthy food it cooks for him. However, as time goes by, and as Frank practices his old skills of breaking and entering, he realises that the robot is absorbing these skills as being something that engages Frank, and begins to encourage him to practice them as it, itself, learns these tricks of the trade and begins to surpass Frank in skill levels. The realisation slowly dawns on Frank that the robot can be an able and willing accomplice in one last heist.

With a bigger showboating actor (Nicholson, Pacino etc) there might have beeen more scene chewing, but Langella opts for a quiet dignity to the role. His large frame and physical stature is ideally suited for such a lion in winter character, making Frank classier and more likeable without ever resorting to mugging me, the viewer, for attention. When he says he ate lunch at a restaurant last week but then is told the place closed over three years ago, it's a moment of sympathy, not guffaw and sets the scene of sympathetic pathos for our anti-hero.

As the plot unfolds, it becomes apparent that Frank has too much pride to concede he can't be self-reliant. Frank's flaky daughter (Liv Tyler) wants to move in to take care of him but she is seriously cramping his style, not to mention his jewel robbery effort.

Any further details of the heist will only give away major spoilers so I'll leave it at that except to say this movie is neither caught up with the crime-caper nor the talking robot.  The story is about a man losing his life and learning to let his guard down. In a way, Robot & Frank is as drama free as Langella's restrained performance.

Robot & Frank doesn't rip your heart out but it makes you mourn for those whose memories are eaten away by the dreadful disease of dementia.
A thoroughly enjoyable movie .. well worth the watching.
fastnet

norrie wrote:
Zero Dark Thirty

Hi guys, Claire and I went to see this film today, we enjoyed it
It held our attention all way through to the end




From the team behind ‘The Hurt Locker’, ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ follows the 10-year US quest to find Osama bin Laden.

Starring Chris Pratt (Moneyball), the film details the operation to bring the world’s most wanted man to justice, from the early stages of the hunt to the special ops mission that culminated in his death at the hands of SEAL Team Six in 2011.

‘Zero Dark Thirty’ also stars Jessica Chastain (The Help) and Joel Edgerton (Warrior).


Cheers norrie.

Might watch this at the weekend.
norrie

Hi Doorstop, is that film on general release or just the arty farty cinemas? it sounds as if I might like to see it
me

norrie wrote:
Hi Doorstop, is that film on general release or just the arty farty cinemas? it sounds as if I might like to see it


http://www.glasgowfilm.org/theatre/whats_on/4832_robot_frank

for one showing only
Doorstop

Thanks Me .. Norrie if you miss it, drop me a PM and we'll arrange something through the post.
norrie

Hi me, thanks for the info, I will miss it
No matter I can get the DVD in world cinema section

Have any of you sen the film, Other Peoples Lives? its about The Secret police of East Germany, The Stasi, subtitled but an excellent film
That too can be bought at The World Cinema section of Fopps or HMV
An excellent film and well worth a watch
Doorstop




[img]https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSomuQXa7J3TTeDDDi2Vi0yniEalYfsHyyDpx7Ve2i9xMvYuaUC[/img]

I'm not one for 'chickflicks'.

I put the term 'chickflick' inside inverted commas because I'm not entirely sure what the phrase means. There are obviously girly movies that are schmaltzy and glib and have nothing to do with real life, and there are others that are way too real (Beaches et al) and set out to destroy your happiness from the outset, but I have just watched a chickflick {on my own, no chick company involved} that was quite simply sublime.

'Silver Linings Playbook', a David O'Russell movie (his sixth since 1994, including the acclaimed 'Three Kings and 'The Fighter') has a rather odd overriding premise of having the seemingly opposing factions in the plotline actually being two 'antiheroes'. Both social pariah after having major mental health problems (the male protagonist via his Bi-Polar disorder, and the female through issues with grief, after the untimely death of her policeman husband, causing her some antisocial behavioural disorders.

Balancing on the edge of a sushi knife between comedy and psychological drama, Silver Linings Playbook opens with, after eight months under a mental health section, the release from a mental institution of the explosive Patrick Solitano Jr. (I think this is where the resonance for me personally begins).

Played by the disgustingly handsome Bradley Cooper (probably best  known for his roles in the "Hangover" movies.) his character has been diagnosed as bipolar after beating up a fellow high school teacher, whom he finds having a shower with his (Pat's) wife.

Primary, in the conditions of his release, is that he takes his medication and lives with his father, Robert De Niro, doing what seems almost second nature by now in playing the part of a 'rough round the edges, antagonistic, but basically warm hearted 'Father' role {who is now running an illegal bookmaking business in his parlour} and his devoted mother.

Meanwhile, he must keep inside the remits of his restraining order in regard to his wife, and make regular visits to his consultant, a carnivorously perceptive yet humorous Indian psychiatrist. (The 'Indian' may seem a bit "un-PC", but the reference becomes clear later in the movie)

Almost every character in this movie is an obsessives of sorts, but are all  'obsessives' whom are of a type that we all know in our everyday livese, as are the majority of the people Patrick meets in his native Philadelphia home streets.

A particular passion they all share is for the local American football team, the Philadelphia Eagles,  Because of the tradition of disruptive behaviour his over-enthusiastic presence encourages, Pat's father has been banned from the Eagles' stadium for an obsession with his support ending up in violence in-stadium, which, in turn, lends itself to directing the viewer to a possible  origin of Pats' mental health problems

Most significant among the people Pat reunites with after release from hospital is the young widow Tiffany, a good-looking woman living in the garage of her parents' home, which she's turned into a dance studio. An old school friend of Patrick's, she hilariously reunites with him over dinner as they exchange notes about the medication they've been taking. The main thrust of the movie afterwards is the dynamic between these two main characters.

Directed through a project to involve him in an annual dance competition, the city's local equivalent of Strictly Come Dancing, he seeks to gain favour with his ex-wife by showing her his new found focus while simultaneously failing to see the bonds he is forming with Tiffany, a woman who is obviously good for him, perhaps better for him than his estranged wife ever was.

I loved this movie .. one of the best I've seen in a while.

Highly recommended.
norrie

Hi Doorstep, I seen clips of that on TV? or was it the preview at the cinema?
Good critique, might even let my wife talk me into seeing it
cybers

I seen this and found it awesome funny but mainly because its right on the money with the mental health issues more than anything else.
The acting is awesome and the dinner party was brilliantly awkward for the "Normals"
norrie

Claire and I went to see this film yesterday afternoon, we enjoyed it and think its a must see film
Based on a true story of Ex POW of the Japanese during WW2
A harrowing film of brutality to the prisoners of war by the Japanese
While watching this film I couldnt help but think, why so few Japanese war criminals?

Here is a review from the press

Actor Colin Firth stars in Railway Man


Osama Bin Laden didn’t just blow up the Twin Towers on 9/11 – he also left Hollywood scarcely able to deliver a good war movie.

Like the West’s decision to wage war on Iraq, filmmakers suddenly had to deal with the combination of trigger fingers and a lack of real context.

Just what were cameramen supposed to be shooting at and why?

Not since Kathryn Bigelow’s The Hurt Locker (2009) has there been a war film as powerful as The Railway Man.

More than Steven Spielberg’s War Horse (2011), this movie has the ability to engross and set you emotionally on edge at the same time.

And all on behalf of generations of World War servicemen who were unable – and unwilling – to talk about the horrors they’d encountered.

Based on a true story, The Railway Man begins with Eric Lomax travelling north.

He’s a railway enthusiast, as opposed to a train spotter, and there are mentions for Birmingham, Warrington, Wigan, Preston and Carnforth, re Celia Jonhson’s Brief Encounter (1945).

Listening is Patricia Wallace (Nicole Kidman), a future wife who will later want to know more about Mr Lomax’s hidden depths.

Former comrade in arms Finlay (Stellan Skarsgård) might be a conduit, but, even then, will her man open up?

Set in 1942 and 1980, the story is laced with flashbacks to his capture in Singapore, the building of the Thai-Burma railway and how British prisoners of war were treated by the Japanese.

Takashi Nagase (played by Hiroyuki Sanada and Tanroh Ishida) is Lomax’s violent nemesis, but the story hinges on how Patti will react to her man confronting his darkest hour four decades later.

War Horse star Jeremy Irvine (who wouldn’t have looked out of place in The Great Escape), plays the younger Lomax who is taken to a room that Firth’s elder version thinks he cannot revisit.

Written by Frank Cottrell Boyce (Millions) and directed by little known Jonathan Teplitzky (Burning Man), this is a fabulously-measured film.

The score by Australian composer David Hirschfelder (Shine / Strictly Ballroom) is exemplary and every 2D frame has been beautifully shot with a depth that eliminates any need for gimmicky 3D.

As an Oscar winner for The King’s Speech (2010), Firth has nothing to prove.

But this is a performance which he might eventually consider to be his finest, speaking volumes for men who quietly carried the burdens of evil on their shoulders.
Lone Groover

My Fillum review is pretty concise  4stars

https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaih...10152232806895879_315137349_n.jpg
norrie

Will watch out for that one, nice review
sputnik

i know the railwayman is the movie of the moment just now but does no one recall the film from 1992 called to end all wars.kiefer sutherland and jimmy cosmo were in it and it pretty much covered the same story as the railway man as far as i can make out.not having seen the railway man though maybe i am a wee bit out here.
cybers

Sunshine on Leith

Scottish Musical based on the back catalogue of The Proclaimers starring Peter Mullan, Paul Brannigan, Jane Horrocks, Jason Flemyng, and George MacKay.

Great wee sing a long movie.
fastnet

Saw that the other day...... Expected Peter Mullan to jump out of his death bed and start singing as well....  



Dallas buyers club..... Good wee film.... McConnaghy is excellent and must be a shoe in for an Oscar.
norrie

I will get Sunshine on Leith on DVD, when its cheap right enough

Dallas Buyers club, fancied that one
sputnik

seen sunshine on leith in the kings and we loved it.how does the movie compare?
fastnet

I thought the play was better.
norrie

Dallas Buyers Club


We missed this film in the cinema and hired it on cable
Great film we really enjoyed it
Matthew McConaughey played a great part
I recommend this one



Dallas Buyers Club is a 2013 American biographical film drama, co-written by Craig Borten and Melisa Wallack, directed by Jean-Marc Vallée. Ron Woodroof (Matthew McConaughey) was a real-life AIDS patient diagnosed in the mid 1980s when HIV/AIDS treatments were under-researched while the disease was not understood and highly stigmatized. As part of the experimental AIDS treatment movement, he smuggled unapproved pharmaceutical drugs into Texas for treating his symptoms, and distributed them to fellow people with AIDS by establishing the "Dallas Buyers Club" while facing opposition from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Two fictional supporting characters, Dr. Eve Saks (Jennifer Garner), and Rayon (Jared Leto), were composite roles created from the writer's interviews with transgender AIDS patients, activists, and doctors.

Screenwriter Borten interviewed Woodroof in 1992 and wrote the script, which he polished with writer Wallack in 2000, and then sold to producer Robbie Brenner. Several other actors, directors, and producers who were attached at various times to the development of the film left the project. Universal Pictures also tried to make the film, but did not. A couple of screenwriters wrote drafts that were rejected. In 2009, producer Brenner involved McConaughey, because of his Dallas origins, the same as Woodroof's. Brenner selected the first draft, written by Borten and Wallack, for the film, and then Vallée was set to direct the film. Principal photography began on November 11, 2012, in New Orleans, Louisiana, continuing for 25 days of filming, which also included shooting in Baton Rouge. Brenner and Rachel Winter co-produced the film. The official soundtrack album was featured by various artists, and was released digitally on October 29, 2013, by the Relativity Music Group.

Dallas Buyers Club premiered at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival and was released theatrically in the United States on November 1, 2013, by Focus Features, strategically entering wide release on November 22 for award season. The film grossed over $27 million domestically and $27.9 million internationally, the box office revenue returned over $55 million against a budget of $5 million in 182-days of a theatrical run. It grossed over $4.5 million from DVD, and over $3 million from Blu-ray sales. The film received widespread critical acclaim, resulting in numerous accolades. Most recognized the performances of McConaughey and Leto, who respectively received the Academy Award for Best Actor and for Best Supporting Actor at the 86th Academy Awards, making this the first film since Mystic River (2003), and only the fifth movie ever, to win both awards. The film also won for Best Makeup and Hairstyling, having received Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay, and Best Editing nominations.
norrie

Claire and I seen this film a couple of weeks ago, Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman are great in it.
Its not a fast paced film but it held both of our attentions trying to figure out who dunnit
I recommend this one to you

Before I Go to Sleep is the first novel by S. J. Watson published in Spring 2011. It became both a Sunday Times and New York Times bestseller[1] and has been translated into over 40 languages,[2] and has become a bestseller in France, Canada, Bulgaria and the Netherlands.[3] It reached number 7 on the US bestseller list, the highest position for a debut novel by a British author since J. K. Rowling. The New York Times described the author as an "out-of-nowhere literary sensation".[4] He wrote the novel between shifts whilst working as a National Health Service (NHS) audiologist.[5]


The novel is a psychological thriller about a woman suffering from anterograde amnesia.[6] She wakes every day with no knowledge of who she is and the novel follows her as she tries to reconstruct her memories from a journal she has been keeping. She learns that she has been seeing a doctor who is helping her to recover her memory, that her name is Christine Lucas, that she is 47 years old and married and has a son. As her journal grows it casts doubts on the truth behind this knowledge as she determines to discover the truth about who she is
Doorstop

... IMDB Link

Gritty thriller. Small town sherriff, Susan Sarandon, fights her way through an alcohol and Vicadin fuelled fog to unravel the mystery of a spate of gruesome killings.

Drab and dreary scenery and cinematography is rarely this engaging. Good to Very Good .. 7.5/10
cybers

I concur
norrie

Doorstep, thanks for the tip off will try and catch it
Doorstop

.. IMDB Link

Definitely not a wasted hour and a half.
Ruchazie Rat

norrie wrote:
Claire and I seen this film a couple of weeks ago, Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman are great in it.
Its not a fast paced film but it held both of our attentions trying to figure out who dunnit
I recommend this one to you

Before I Go to Sleep is the first novel by S. J. Watson published in Spring 2011. It became both a Sunday Times and New York Times bestseller[1] and has been translated into over 40 languages,[2] and has become a bestseller in France, Canada, Bulgaria and the Netherlands.[3] It reached number 7 on the US bestseller list, the highest position for a debut novel by a British author since J. K. Rowling. The New York Times described the author as an "out-of-nowhere literary sensation".[4] He wrote the novel between shifts whilst working as a National Health Service (NHS) audiologist.[5]

The novel is a psychological thriller about a woman suffering from anterograde amnesia.[6] She wakes every day with no knowledge of who she is and the novel follows her as she tries to reconstruct her memories from a journal she has been keeping. She learns that she has been seeing a doctor who is helping her to recover her memory, that her name is Christine Lucas, that she is 47 years old and married and has a son. As her journal grows it casts doubts on the truth behind this knowledge as she determines to discover the truth about who she is


Sounds a bit like a rip-off of Chris Nolan`s "Momento"...
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